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BUSINESS
April 21, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Changes in technology and the economy mean that a large number of middle-management positions have been eliminated. As a result, responsibility for supervisory functions is being handed down the corporate ladder. "With right-sizing--or whatever companies call it--we have had to become more flexible and knowledgeable," said Sydney Alexander, a secretary for Hughes Aircraft Co. in Fullerton.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2013 | By Howard Blume
L.A. Unified is improving faster - in some categories much faster - than most other large, urban school systems, according to the latest results of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, which tests a sample of students nationwide. And while the district's overall scores remained relatively low, its progress elicited praise from U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan. Los Angeles is among the school systems that are "examples for the rest of the country of what can happen when schools embrace innovative reforms," Duncan said.
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NEWS
February 16, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The president of the University of the Pacific, expressing shock at what he called U.S. Education Secretary William J. Bennett's "insensitivity" to students' needs, has withdrawn an offer of an honorary degree. Stanley E. McCaffrey, president of the 6,000-student private university in Stockton, took offense at Bennett's recent remark that some students would have to forgo stereos, cars and beach vacations to make up for lost federal aid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Howard Blume
The nation's top education official threatened Monday to withhold federal funds if California lawmakers approved pending legislation to revamp the state's standardized testing system. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan issued the warning as AB 484 awaits a full vote of the Assembly and state Senate. The proposed law would end the standardized exams used since 1999 and replace them next spring with a computerized system. The purpose is to advance new learning goals, called the Common Core standards, that have been adopted by 45 states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2007 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Wednesday appointed David Long, Riverside County's superintendent of schools since 1999, as the new state secretary of education. Long, a 67-year-old Republican who lives in Canyon Lake, will be paid $175,000. Schwarzenegger said Wednesday, "David shares my values when it comes to education: improving student achievement, bringing up low-performing schools, hiring quality teachers, building new facilities."
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | From United Press International
The Senate on Thursday confirmed by voice vote the nomination of former Tennessee Gov. Lamar Alexander as education secretary. With the education post filled, President Bush has a complete Cabinet after a midterm shuffle that created new secretaries of agriculture, labor and education. Alexander, 50, will join an Education Department that has been without a secretary since Lauro F. Cavazos resigned three months ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Howard Blume
The nation's top education official threatened Monday to withhold federal funds if California lawmakers approved pending legislation to revamp the state's standardized testing system. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan issued the warning as AB 484 awaits a full vote of the Assembly and state Senate. The proposed law would end the standardized exams used since 1999 and replace them next spring with a computerized system. The purpose is to advance new learning goals, called the Common Core standards, that have been adopted by 45 states.
NEWS
June 24, 1996 | From Associated Press
Former U.S. Department of Education Secretary Terrel H. Bell, who was credited with starting a national school reform movement, died Saturday of pulmonary fibrosis. He was 74. Bell headed the Department of Education from 1981 to 1985 under President Ronald Reagan. Thereafter, he remained active in promoting education and learning, founding the educational consulting firm T. H. Bell and Associates. He wrote "How to Shape Up Our Nation's Schools" in 1991.
NEWS
October 2, 1996 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN and ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday appointed longtime political ally Marian Bergeson, an Orange County conservative who has criticized bilingual education and supported giving parents tuition vouchers for private schools, as his top education advisor. Wilson is expected to seek a voucher program during his last two years in office, and Bergeson, 71, said she will push the governor's agenda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 1985 | BILL BILLITER, Times Staff Writer
U. S. Education Secretary William J. Bennett told the Vietnamese League of Orange County on Tuesday night that some colleges and universities may be discriminating against Asian-American students by using "unofficial quotas." Such discrimination, Bennett said, comes in spite of the "remarkable" educational achievements of Asian-Americans throughout the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2010 | By Jason Felch and Jason Song, Los Angeles Times
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said Monday that parents have a right to know if their children's teachers are effective, endorsing the public release of information about how well individual teachers fare at raising their students' test scores. "What's there to hide?" Duncan said in an interview one day after The Times published an analysis of teacher effectiveness in the Los Angeles Unified School District, the nation's second largest school system. "In education, we've been scared to talk about success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2009 | By Howard Blume
L.A.'s top school official on Thursday unveiled his plan to shut down Fremont High and start over from scratch -- a move denounced by the teachers union but applauded by city leaders and the nation's secretary of education. After quietly alerting the Fremont staff Wednesday afternoon, Los Angeles Unified School District Supt. Ramon C. Cortines spoke separately with students, parents, city leaders and U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan, who was in town to promote such school turnarounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2009 | Jason Song and Jason Felch
The nation's top education official praised Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Tuesday for signing a bill that will make California eligible for competitive federal education funding. Schwarzenegger signed the bill, SB 19 by Sen. Joe Simitian (D-Palo Alto), on Sunday, striking a clause in a 2006 law Simitian wrote that bars state use of testing data to determine educator pay or promotion. "This is a victory for children," said U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan in a telephone interview Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2009 | Evan Halper and Shane Goldmacher
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger asked lawmakers to blow up the boxes of government, and on Wednesday they obliged -- though not exactly as he envisioned. A legislative budget committee delayed action on many of Schwarzenegger's proposals for cutting waste, and instead took an ax to operations managed by the governor. They voted to get rid of entire departments and agencies under his authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2007 | Jordan Rau, Times Staff Writer
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Wednesday appointed David Long, Riverside County's superintendent of schools since 1999, as the new state secretary of education. Long, a 67-year-old Republican who lives in Canyon Lake, will be paid $175,000. Schwarzenegger said Wednesday, "David shares my values when it comes to education: improving student achievement, bringing up low-performing schools, hiring quality teachers, building new facilities."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2003 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
Richard Riordan, California's newly appointed secretary for education, is exploring the possibility of also becoming president of the State Board of Education as a way to further his and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's influence over school policy and to press their reform ideas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Education Secretary Rod Paige on Saturday urged the nation's largest teachers union to throw its support behind President Bush's education reform bill, saying that teachers will ultimately determine whether the program succeeds. Paige's speech at a conference of the National Education Assn. steered clear of many controversial issues and served mainly as a goodwill gesture to a union often criticized by Republicans as being an impediment to reforms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1995 | TOM JENNINGS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Piedad Robertson is no stranger to controversy. And controversy is what has ensued since it was announced last week that Robertson, the secretary of education in Massachusetts, will be the next president of Santa Monica College. The decision by the school's Board of Trustees to choose her over local favorite Darroch F. (Rocky) Young, a Santa Monica College administrator, has deeply divided the Pico Boulevard campus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2001 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Education Secretary Rod Paige on Saturday urged the nation's largest teachers union to throw its support behind President Bush's education reform bill, saying that teachers will ultimately determine whether the program succeeds. Paige's speech at a conference of the National Education Assn. steered clear of many controversial issues and served mainly as a goodwill gesture to a union often criticized by Republicans as being an impediment to reforms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997 | JEFF KASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The kids at Heninger Elementary School have a leg up, the U.S. secretary of education told them Friday: They speak a second language. But, Secretary Richard W. Riley told them, good reading skills will be the key to their success. "Reading is something you have to do every day," Riley told a gathering of more than 50 students, teachers, parents and school officials. "You don't get a good job without it. It improves your education, but it's also fun."
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