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NEWS
February 4, 1994 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dictation? Toss out those steno pads, forget that shorthand. These days, bosses can write their own letters on their own personal computers. Need to schedule a meeting for 50 staffers? Let a PIM (personal information manager) in your computer scope out everyone's calendar, send E-mail invitations and record the RSVPs. Add another figure to the list of endangered species: the traditional office secretary.
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NEWS
February 4, 1994 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dictation? Toss out those steno pads, forget that shorthand. These days, bosses can write their own letters on their own personal computers. Need to schedule a meeting for 50 staffers? Let a PIM (personal information manager) in your computer scope out everyone's calendar, send E-mail invitations and record the RSVPs. Add another figure to the list of endangered species: the traditional office secretary.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Changes in technology and the economy mean that a large number of middle-management positions have been eliminated. As a result, responsibility for supervisory functions is being handed down the corporate ladder. "With right-sizing--or whatever companies call it--we have had to become more flexible and knowledgeable," said Sydney Alexander, a secretary for Hughes Aircraft Co. in Fullerton.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1993 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Changes in technology and the economy mean that a large number of middle-management positions have been eliminated. As a result, responsibility for supervisory functions is being handed down the corporate ladder. "With right-sizing--or whatever companies call it--we have had to become more flexible and knowledgeable," said Sydney Alexander, a secretary for Hughes Aircraft Co. in Fullerton.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an odd political twist, the Administration of Gov. George Deukmejian on Thursday proposed requiring all California employers to provide health insurance for their workers, only to have the governor immediately disown the plan. Deukmejian, in a statement released by his office, suggested that the ambitious proposal, crafted by his chief advisers on health and business issues, was no more than one additional ingredient in the stewpot of ideas on health insurance simmering in the Legislature.
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an odd political twist, the Administration of Gov. George Deukmejian on Thursday proposed requiring all California employers to provide health insurance for their workers, only to have the governor immediately disown the plan. Deukmejian, in a statement released by his office, suggested that the ambitious proposal, crafted by his chief advisers on health and business issues, was no more than one additional ingredient in the stewpot of ideas on health insurance simmering in the Legislature.
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