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Secretary Hodel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1986
Secretary Hodel's arrogance is overshadowed only by his stupidity! SUZANNE ACKERMAN Burbank
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1987
The Times rhapsodizing in its editorial "A Dream to Savor" (Oct. 15) about the proposed draining of the Hetch Hetchy reservoir was incongruous, considering that with such lofty phrases it was threatening a portion of San Francisco's water supply. One wonders what reaction The Times would have to a savvy Bay Area paper countering with a proposal to similarly shake up Owens Valley as a water source for Southern California. Somehow I can't see it being quite so sanguine on that subject.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1987
I must vigorously disagree with the assertion of Alan Louis Kishbaugh (Letters, Feb. 21) that "Donald P. Hodel wants to open up the national parks and monuments to mining and timber interests." During his Senate confirmation testimony of February, 1985, Secretary Hodel repeatedly and emphatically stated, "I will not consider, I will not support, and will not permit development activities such as mining, drilling or timber harvesting in the national parks." Mineral leasing is expressly prohibited in national parks and monuments by the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 and the Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947.
MAGAZINE
October 18, 1987 | PAUL CIOTTI, Paul Ciotti is a Los Angeles Times Magazine staff writer.
FROM INSIDE, AN offshore oil-drilling platform looks like a combination aircraft carrier and moon base. The crew walks around on catwalks high over the water and moves among the five main levels on steep, vertiginous stairs. Below the twin drilling towers and helicopter pad, the platform is a Mad Max landscape of pipes, valves, tanks, drums, condensers, scrubbers, separators and pumps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1985
From the so-called hearing held by Secretary Hodel in Oceanside on Aug. 31, it is evident to me that the "compromise" is just a divide-and-conquer gambit to get coastal areas vying with each other in hopes the drilling rigs will go someplace else. What the Administration hopes to do is implant the virus of drilling in a limited area, then spread the infection along our entire coast. Hodel's slick presentation made it seem he represented the oil and gas industry, not a federal department charged with preserving natural resources such as our California coastline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1986
Congratulations are in order for an editorial that was accurate, well-written and to the point. Since coming to Congress in 1981, I have been involved in countless debates on policy for the Outer Continental Shelf. Negotiations have ranged from arduous at least to misleading at best, such as Secretary Hodel's repudiation of last July's congressionally negotiated agreement. I am a member of the California negotiating team designated by the Speaker of the House in an attempt to work out another agreement with Interior over the offshore leasing issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1987
Secretary of Interior Donald Paul Hodel (Letters, July 6) exhibits the duplicity typical of this Administration regarding conservation of the environment and of wildlife. Under him and his predecessors, our natural resources, our national parks and forests have been managed primarily as profit generators. The parks have been opened up and much of their wildlife destroyed for the benefit of commercial establishments. Billions of tax dollars have purchased access roads through national forests for the benefit of logging interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1987
Your report (June 15) indicating that Interior Secretary Donald P. Hodel wants to eliminate California's limited influence over offshore oil rigs is alarming. Hodel is wrong in stating that the California Coastal Commission is "usurping" federal authority. It is outrageous for the secretary to suggest that the efforts of California to protect its coast is a threat to a "free society." Since 1978 the Coastal Commission has approved 451 exploratory wells in federal waters. In addition, it has approved almost every development and production plan presented to it. It is true that the Coastal Commission has insisted that offshore oil activity be conducted in such a way that "adverse environmental effects are mitigated to the maximum extent feasible."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1985
I find it ironic that Secretary of the Interior Donald Hodel (Letters, Sept. 25) characterizes his position on offshore drilling as one of "caring for the California Coast." Hodel argues that America will sooner or later need our offshore oil resources and it is better to tap those resources now rather than waiting for a time of true need. It appears that this time of need will probably be more later than sooner. An August lease sale in the Gulf of Mexico area produced a notably poor showing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1987
Secretary of Interior Donald Paul Hodel (Letters, July 6) exhibits the duplicity typical of this Administration regarding conservation of the environment and of wildlife. Under him and his predecessors, our natural resources, our national parks and forests have been managed primarily as profit generators. The parks have been opened up and much of their wildlife destroyed for the benefit of commercial establishments. Billions of tax dollars have purchased access roads through national forests for the benefit of logging interests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1987
Your report (June 15) indicating that Interior Secretary Donald P. Hodel wants to eliminate California's limited influence over offshore oil rigs is alarming. Hodel is wrong in stating that the California Coastal Commission is "usurping" federal authority. It is outrageous for the secretary to suggest that the efforts of California to protect its coast is a threat to a "free society." Since 1978 the Coastal Commission has approved 451 exploratory wells in federal waters. In addition, it has approved almost every development and production plan presented to it. It is true that the Coastal Commission has insisted that offshore oil activity be conducted in such a way that "adverse environmental effects are mitigated to the maximum extent feasible."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1987
I must vigorously disagree with the assertion of Alan Louis Kishbaugh (Letters, Feb. 21) that "Donald P. Hodel wants to open up the national parks and monuments to mining and timber interests." During his Senate confirmation testimony of February, 1985, Secretary Hodel repeatedly and emphatically stated, "I will not consider, I will not support, and will not permit development activities such as mining, drilling or timber harvesting in the national parks." Mineral leasing is expressly prohibited in national parks and monuments by the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920 and the Mineral Leasing Act for Acquired Lands of 1947.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1986
Congratulations are in order for an editorial that was accurate, well-written and to the point. Since coming to Congress in 1981, I have been involved in countless debates on policy for the Outer Continental Shelf. Negotiations have ranged from arduous at least to misleading at best, such as Secretary Hodel's repudiation of last July's congressionally negotiated agreement. I am a member of the California negotiating team designated by the Speaker of the House in an attempt to work out another agreement with Interior over the offshore leasing issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1986
Secretary Hodel's arrogance is overshadowed only by his stupidity! SUZANNE ACKERMAN Burbank
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