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NATIONAL
January 8, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Monday made his first official visit to Southern California since taking the post, kicking off his second year in office by presenting awards to 17 sailors, including several Navy SEALs, who recently returned from Iraq. Gates spent 141 days on the road last year, mostly on high-profile overseas trips to regional hot spots and world capitals.
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NATIONAL
November 26, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Paul Richter and Christi Parsons, Barnes, Richter and Parsons are writers in our Washington bureau.
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has agreed to serve in President-elect Barack Obama's Cabinet, advisors said Tuesday, setting up the unusual situation in which a wartime Pentagon chief remains to work under a president who has condemned the previous administration's policies. An official close to the Obama transition team said it was likely that Gates would be named Defense secretary when the president-elect begins to unveil his national security team in announcements expected next week.
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NEWS
February 9, 2001 | From the Washington Post
The Bush administration has asked one of the Pentagon's most unconventional thinkers to conduct a sweeping review of the U.S. military, in the clearest indication yet that senior officials intend to shake up the nation's armed forces and the weapons they use. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has asked Andrew Marshall, head of the Pentagon's internal think tank, to deliver his preliminary recommendations by the end of next week, sources said.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2008 | Peter Spiegel and Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writers
With two wars raging and an election approaching, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates has sent senior civilians at the Pentagon a clear message: Be ready to stick around into a new administration to ensure a smooth hand-over in a time of war. But increasingly, the campaigns of Democrat Barack Obama and Republican John McCain have considered sending a similar message to Gates.
NEWS
April 25, 2001 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld has asked government ethics officials for another three months to divest personal holdings worth millions of dollars because he has been unable to find buyers, the Pentagon said Tuesday. Under federal ethics rules, senior administration appointees are required within 90 days of taking office to sell assets that could present a conflict of interest.
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | From Reuters
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen said Monday that deeper cuts in U.S. and Russian nuclear arms would save scarce defense funds in both countries, but he refused to say whether the Pentagon had pressed Congress to make unilateral cuts. He was asked at a news conference about a New York Times article saying the Pentagon had quietly recommended in a report in April that Congress consider unilateral cuts because of weakening security threats coupled with budget concerns.
WORLD
June 4, 2007 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates arrived Sunday evening for his second visit to the Afghan capital since becoming the Pentagon chief, saying that he believes progress is being made in the country, but he wants to ensure there is no slackening of effort. Gates first visited Afghanistan in January, just weeks into his tenure, after which he expressed guarded optimism, saying the situation on the ground was better than he had expected.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2006 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Once one of the most controversial men in Washington, Robert M. Gates stepped into what passes in the nation's capital for a congressional love-fest Tuesday for the simple reason that he was not Donald H. Rumsfeld. The last time around, when Gates was nominated to head the CIA in 1991, the hearings stretched over months -- with the nominee facing hundreds of tough, personal questions. This time, Gates, nominated to become secretary of Defense, was questioned publicly for less than a day.
WORLD
June 12, 2003 | Esther Schrader, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld traveled to Germany on Wednesday for the first time since the war in Iraq but did little to mend the rift between Washington and Berlin.
NEWS
April 2, 2003 | Doyle McManus and Esther Schrader, Times Staff Writers
Despite mounting complaints from U.S. Army officers that Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld gave them fewer troops than they wanted for the war in Iraq, he appears to be escaping the kind of criticisms that could imperil his job: sniping from Congress or within the Bush administration. Rumsfeld won new public endorsements Tuesday from Sen. John W. Warner (R-Va.), chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, and Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Alpine), chairman of the House Armed Services Committee.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
If Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates had his way, the protracted presidential nomination battles underway in the Republican and Democratic parties would end sooner rather than later. "Once somebody contemplates the prospect that they may be president of the United States, they're going to begin thinking about what they're going to inherit," Gates said in an interview. "And I think it will be, regardless of party, a sobering realization."
NATIONAL
January 8, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Monday made his first official visit to Southern California since taking the post, kicking off his second year in office by presenting awards to 17 sailors, including several Navy SEALs, who recently returned from Iraq. Gates spent 141 days on the road last year, mostly on high-profile overseas trips to regional hot spots and world capitals.
WORLD
June 4, 2007 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates arrived Sunday evening for his second visit to the Afghan capital since becoming the Pentagon chief, saying that he believes progress is being made in the country, but he wants to ensure there is no slackening of effort. Gates first visited Afghanistan in January, just weeks into his tenure, after which he expressed guarded optimism, saying the situation on the ground was better than he had expected.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2006 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
The Senate voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to confirm Robert M. Gates as the 22nd U.S. secretary of Defense, giving the former CIA director decisive bipartisan support amid the increasingly divisive debate over the war in Iraq. The Senate voted 95 to 2 to approve Gates' nomination. White House officials said he would be sworn in Dec. 18. The quick handover would mean Donald H.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2006 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Once one of the most controversial men in Washington, Robert M. Gates stepped into what passes in the nation's capital for a congressional love-fest Tuesday for the simple reason that he was not Donald H. Rumsfeld. The last time around, when Gates was nominated to head the CIA in 1991, the hearings stretched over months -- with the nominee facing hundreds of tough, personal questions. This time, Gates, nominated to become secretary of Defense, was questioned publicly for less than a day.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2006 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
Robert M. Gates, President Bush's nominee to become Defense secretary, testified Tuesday that the United States was not winning the war in Iraq and said he would consider new courses of action, including a gradual withdrawal of American troops. Appearing before a Senate committee weighing his confirmation, Gates proved a sharp contrast to outgoing Defense Secretary Donald H.
NEWS
January 23, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William S. Cohen was unanimously confirmed as secretary of Defense on Thursday after unequivocally promising his former Senate colleagues that U.S. forces would be out of Bosnia in 18 months. Describing his words as a "very strong signal for our European friends," the former Republican senator declared at his confirmation hearing: "We are not going to be there. This is going to end at that point."
NATIONAL
November 10, 2006 | Greg Miller and Julian Barnes, Times Staff Writers
President Bush's nominee to be the next Defense secretary once urged missile strikes on North Korea to keep the communist country from acquiring nuclear weapons. But within weeks, Robert M. Gates recommended a radically different approach on Iran, urging talks instead of threats to get the Islamic regime to relinquish its nuclear program. He has consistently defended the decision to leave Saddam Hussein in power after the 1991 Persian Gulf War.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2006 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
A week ago, President Bush said in an interview with news service reporters that he wanted Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld to remain at the Pentagon for the administration's final two years. On Wednesday, he said Rumsfeld was leaving, and he made it clear that he agreed there was a need for a "fresh perspective" at the Defense Department.
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