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Secretary Of State Baker

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990
Reports on Lebanon give evidence that Syria is tightening its grip there. Apparently, for a few thousand men sent to Saudi Arabia, Syria has received the U.S. Administration's green light. I would predict that in the near future we will learn of the incorporation of Lebanon as Syria's newest "province." Any takers? NATHAN KRAVETZ Sherman Oaks
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1992
Could it be that former Secretary of State Baker has made himself invisible as mentor of the Bush campaign in order to position himself as a presidential candidate in 1996? He doesn't want the Bush 1992 election fiasco as a millstone around his neck. ROBERT MILBY Montebello
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OPINION
September 16, 1990
This is no time to send mixed signals when it comes to diplomacy and trade. The United States is forging a historic alliance to confront Iraqi aggression, but efforts in Washington to pass protectionist trade legislation are undermining our other international commitments. If Washington clings to parochial domestic interests, it risks the quid pro quo goodwill needed to loosen international restrictions that hurt U.S. trade abroad.
OPINION
November 10, 1991 | Richard B. Straus, Richard B. Straus is the editor of the Middle East Policy Survey
The Middle East peace conference in Madrid revealed what is possible when a fight ends with the victor unable to accept he has won, the vanquished unwilling to admit he has lost and the referee insistent on keeping the outcome to himself. Of course, it helps if the winners are the neurotically insecure Israelis, the losers are vainglorious Arabs and the ref is the ever wily U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1992
Could it be that former Secretary of State Baker has made himself invisible as mentor of the Bush campaign in order to position himself as a presidential candidate in 1996? He doesn't want the Bush 1992 election fiasco as a millstone around his neck. ROBERT MILBY Montebello
MAGAZINE
January 27, 1991
Never mind what Jim Baker or George Bush don't do out of ignorance; let's ask what journalism can do. As you note, "Secretary of State Baker . . . has closed his doors to almost all of the assistant secretaries," who are the real experts with real information. You should go on to confess that newspapers and broadcasters can always open these doors. If necessary, hire lawyers and file Freedom of Information suits. No doubt, going behind the facade to get "unofficial" information out of an organization can cause resentment, but that edgy/suspicious uncertainty is what all reporters should have known about from their first assignment to a police beat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1989
The Bush Administration and Congress are moving with glacial speed on the question of resuming membership in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO, which ignores the opportunity to accelerate reforms within the organization. Part of the problem may be financial. Some worry that the annual share of some $50 million would break a budget already so tight it is playing havoc with important basic programs. That is the worst of all reasons. If the United States cannot afford participation in international organizations, who can?
NEWS
April 29, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dispute over Hebrew texts, with notes scribbled in the margins by five generations of rabbis in a tiny Byelorussian town, has become a test of wills between the Chabad Lubavitch movement and Soviet bureaucrats. Four rabbis from the United States and Israel say they will stay in Moscow until they are given more than 12,000 books that belonged to chief Lubavitch Rabbi Sholom Ber Schneerson.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is, they say, one lobe of Jim Baker's brain--the consummate inside strategist who provides the ideas and intellectual underpinning for the programs that James A. Baker III has advanced, first as secretary of the Treasury and now as secretary of state. So the nomination of Robert B. Zoellick to be undersecretary of state for economic affairs has caused Washington insiders to take notice. A job that has been something of a bureaucratic backwater is about to become much more important.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Secretary of State James A. Baker III was in town this week urging Israel to give up land in exchange for peace with Palestinians and with Arab states, a little-publicized battle over the location of a Jewish cemetery illustrates how Israel has come to view its hold on the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip as permanent.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is, they say, one lobe of Jim Baker's brain--the consummate inside strategist who provides the ideas and intellectual underpinning for the programs that James A. Baker III has advanced, first as secretary of the Treasury and now as secretary of state. So the nomination of Robert B. Zoellick to be undersecretary of state for economic affairs has caused Washington insiders to take notice. A job that has been something of a bureaucratic backwater is about to become much more important.
NEWS
April 29, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dispute over Hebrew texts, with notes scribbled in the margins by five generations of rabbis in a tiny Byelorussian town, has become a test of wills between the Chabad Lubavitch movement and Soviet bureaucrats. Four rabbis from the United States and Israel say they will stay in Moscow until they are given more than 12,000 books that belonged to chief Lubavitch Rabbi Sholom Ber Schneerson.
NEWS
March 15, 1991 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Secretary of State James A. Baker III was in town this week urging Israel to give up land in exchange for peace with Palestinians and with Arab states, a little-publicized battle over the location of a Jewish cemetery illustrates how Israel has come to view its hold on the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip as permanent.
MAGAZINE
January 27, 1991
Never mind what Jim Baker or George Bush don't do out of ignorance; let's ask what journalism can do. As you note, "Secretary of State Baker . . . has closed his doors to almost all of the assistant secretaries," who are the real experts with real information. You should go on to confess that newspapers and broadcasters can always open these doors. If necessary, hire lawyers and file Freedom of Information suits. No doubt, going behind the facade to get "unofficial" information out of an organization can cause resentment, but that edgy/suspicious uncertainty is what all reporters should have known about from their first assignment to a police beat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990
Reports on Lebanon give evidence that Syria is tightening its grip there. Apparently, for a few thousand men sent to Saudi Arabia, Syria has received the U.S. Administration's green light. I would predict that in the near future we will learn of the incorporation of Lebanon as Syria's newest "province." Any takers? NATHAN KRAVETZ Sherman Oaks
OPINION
September 16, 1990
This is no time to send mixed signals when it comes to diplomacy and trade. The United States is forging a historic alliance to confront Iraqi aggression, but efforts in Washington to pass protectionist trade legislation are undermining our other international commitments. If Washington clings to parochial domestic interests, it risks the quid pro quo goodwill needed to loosen international restrictions that hurt U.S. trade abroad.
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