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NEWS
March 26, 1990 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few weeks ago, as Secretary of State James A. Baker III was regaling a rapt breakfast table of congressmen with tales from his latest visit to Moscow, a pair of Democrats broke in to complain about the Administration's foreign aid programs. If the Cold War was over, they asked, why hadn't the budget changed? Why wasn't there more money for the new democracies in Eastern Europe and poor countries in Latin America and Africa? Baker's hazel eyes narrowed. His honeyed voice went cold.
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NATIONAL
November 24, 2008 | Paul Richter, Richter is a writer in our Washington bureau.
Cordell Hull was a veteran lawmaker with a worldwide reputation when Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed him secretary of State in 1933, in part to win needed support from Hull's army of Democratic admirers. But the dignified Tennessean was never close to FDR. As time passed, he was "muscled out by others in the administration," said Michael Hunt, a diplomatic historian at the University of North Carolina.
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NEWS
January 28, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his first official workday, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell was treated to a rousing surprise welcome from staffers who packed the flag-draped State Department lobby. "This is so marvelous I think we ought to do it again tomorrow," he teased, to peals of laughter. But by week's end, Powell had served up his own set of surprises--to both U.S. diplomats and foreign governments--that suggests just how different the new Bush administration's foreign policy will be in both style and substance.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Hillary Rodham Clinton, Barack Obama's former rival for the Democratic presidential nomination, is among those President-elect Obama is considering for secretary of State, according to two Democratic officials in close contact with his transition team. The two officials spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid angering Obama and his staff. The New York senator's spokesman Philippe Reines referred questions to the Obama transition team, which said it had no comment.
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | From Reuters
Retired Gen. Colin L. Powell said on Sunday the Republican Party has failed to adequately represent America's blacks, but he would consider serving as secretary of State under Republican George W. Bush if the Texas governor wins the presidency. Powell, a prominent black Republican whose popularity during the Persian Gulf War led to calls for him to step up as a presidential candidate in 1996, has previously indicated he was not interested in running for vice president under Bush.
NEWS
December 17, 2000
Following is a partial text of the remarks by retired Gen. Colin L. Powell when he was nominated to be secretary of State: Thank you so very much, ladies and gentlemen, Mr. President-elect and Mrs. Bush, Mr. Vice President-elect Cheney, ladies and gentlemen, citizens of Crawford, Texas. It's a great pleasure to be with you this afternoon, and I'm honored, honored, to be given the opportunity to return to public service as the 65th secretary of State of the United States of America. Mr.
NEWS
January 21, 1997 | Associated Press
Madeleine Albright won unanimous approval Monday from the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, which sent her nomination as secretary of state to the full Senate, where quick confirmation is expected. Albright, the first of President Clinton's new Cabinet nominees to pass Senate committee scrutiny, will become the nation's first female secretary of state. The Senate is to take up her nomination Wednesday. During a Jan. 8 confirmation hearing, the committee, chaired by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.
NEWS
January 23, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William S. Cohen was unanimously confirmed as secretary of Defense on Thursday after unequivocally promising his former Senate colleagues that U.S. forces would be out of Bosnia in 18 months. Describing his words as a "very strong signal for our European friends," the former Republican senator declared at his confirmation hearing: "We are not going to be there. This is going to end at that point."
NEWS
January 25, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New Secretary of State Madeleine Albright declared Friday that she intends to take a road less traveled during her term--crisscrossing this country to try to convince Americans of the need for a strong, engaged U.S. foreign policy.
NEWS
October 14, 1996 | JIM MANN
It's time to bid an early farewell to the much-maligned secretary of State who has served as flak-catcher for President Clinton's foreign policy--and to ponder what his experience in Washington has told us about America's role in the world. Secretary of State Warren Christopher, by all indications, is leaving. He seems to be in his last months. Christopher won't say that, but all the signs are there. He was traveling in Africa last week, after a tour of South America earlier this year.
NATIONAL
January 19, 2005 | Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writer
As the curtain rose Tuesday on her sure-to-be-contentious Senate confirmation hearing, Condoleezza Rice entered the packed hearing room with one California Democrat on her side and the other one the thorn in it. First, Rice, President Bush's nominee for secretary of State, listened as Sen. Dianne Feinstein called the nominee a "remarkable woman" and recounted her rise from segregated Alabama to provost of Stanford University and presidential advisor.
NEWS
January 28, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his first official workday, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell was treated to a rousing surprise welcome from staffers who packed the flag-draped State Department lobby. "This is so marvelous I think we ought to do it again tomorrow," he teased, to peals of laughter. But by week's end, Powell had served up his own set of surprises--to both U.S. diplomats and foreign governments--that suggests just how different the new Bush administration's foreign policy will be in both style and substance.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an early indication that bipartisanship may already have ended in foreign policy, Secretary of State-designate Colin L. Powell stood his ground Wednesday as Senate Democrats confronted him with tough questions and polite warnings on a range of hot-button issues.
NEWS
December 17, 2000
Following is a partial text of the remarks by retired Gen. Colin L. Powell when he was nominated to be secretary of State: Thank you so very much, ladies and gentlemen, Mr. President-elect and Mrs. Bush, Mr. Vice President-elect Cheney, ladies and gentlemen, citizens of Crawford, Texas. It's a great pleasure to be with you this afternoon, and I'm honored, honored, to be given the opportunity to return to public service as the 65th secretary of State of the United States of America. Mr.
NEWS
June 26, 2000 | From Reuters
Retired Gen. Colin L. Powell said on Sunday the Republican Party has failed to adequately represent America's blacks, but he would consider serving as secretary of State under Republican George W. Bush if the Texas governor wins the presidency. Powell, a prominent black Republican whose popularity during the Persian Gulf War led to calls for him to step up as a presidential candidate in 1996, has previously indicated he was not interested in running for vice president under Bush.
NEWS
February 26, 2000 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a dismaying catalog of government-sanctioned murder, torture and repression, respect for individual liberty and democracy has never been greater, with more people living under elected governments than ever before, the State Department said Friday in its annual report on human rights around the globe. "We are blessed to live at a time of broader respect for basic human rights than ever before in history," Secretary of State Madeleine Albright told reporters.
NEWS
December 19, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton met here Friday with Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.), believed to be his selection for secretary of defense, and sources said Rep. Dave McCurdy (D-Okla.) was likely to be offered the post of director of central intelligence. It was unclear whether McCurdy, 42, who had mounted an aggressive bid for the Pentagon job, would accept the CIA post. He has suggested he would prefer to remain in the House of Representatives than take charge of the CIA.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER and JACK NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President-elect Bill Clinton is believed to be on the verge of making two key urban policy appointments--Henry G. Cisneros, the former mayor of San Antonio, to head the Department of Housing and Urban Development and William Daley, the brother of Chicago's mayor, to head the Department of Transportation.
NEWS
January 17, 1999 | TYLER MARSHALL and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As she contemplates the last two years of her Cabinet tenure, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright has begun drawing plans for a new international order, one that would revamp existing global institutions and spawn entirely new ones. Albright sketched the outlines of her idea for a new, formal grouping of the world's democratic nations in a wide-ranging interview recently with Times reporters.
NEWS
March 1, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These have not been easy times for President Clinton's three-member foreign affairs brain trust. The "ABC" team--Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, National Security Advisor Samuel R. "Sandy" Berger and Defense Secretary William S. Cohen--took a broadside of verbal hits first at a public meeting in Ohio as they steered the United States toward armed conflict with Iraq, then from congressional Republicans when they accepted an ambiguous, eleventh-hour agreement brokered by U.N.
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