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NATIONAL
May 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee sent Idaho Gov. Dirk Kempthorne's nomination as Interior secretary to the full Senate, although procedural delays by lawmakers may stall his final confirmation to the Cabinet. The panel approved Kempthorne's nomination on a voice vote. No senator opposed him, although Sen. Mary L. Landrieu (D-La.) voted "present" to protest the Bush administration's refusal to share a portion of offshore oil and gas royalties with Gulf Coast states.
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NATIONAL
May 11, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee sent Idaho Gov. Dirk Kempthorne's nomination as Interior secretary to the full Senate, although procedural delays by lawmakers may stall his final confirmation to the Cabinet. The panel approved Kempthorne's nomination on a voice vote. No senator opposed him, although Sen. Mary L. Landrieu (D-La.) voted "present" to protest the Bush administration's refusal to share a portion of offshore oil and gas royalties with Gulf Coast states.
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NATIONAL
April 18, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Eighty-seven House members are warning Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton that her agency's plan to transfer ownership of roads across the West to counties or states violates the law, and they are urging her to delay any transfers.
NATIONAL
April 18, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Eighty-seven House members are warning Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton that her agency's plan to transfer ownership of roads across the West to counties or states violates the law, and they are urging her to delay any transfers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1993 | From Associated Press
Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. said Thursday he will leave office without approving a plan to save the northern spotted owl, leaving the controversial decision to the Clinton Administration. "I did not wish to take an action that might bind the hands of the next secretary of the interior," Lujan said in a prepared statement. Environmentalists and the timber industry applauded Lujan's decision to leave the decision to Interior Secretary-designate Bruce Babbitt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two recent court decisions ordering the federal government to set aside habitat for endangered animals in Orange County signal a new conflict nationwide between Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt and environmentalists. In court, before Congress and in policy statements, Babbitt has made it clear that he wants to get rid of the so-called critical habitat law, a key part of the Endangered Species Act.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, acting Monday on nearly 1,000 appeals that had piled up over the summer, announced that it will rule on whether motorists may be stopped by the police at highway checkpoints to see if they are drunk. Despite the growing use of sobriety checkpoints in many states, including California, the high court never has ruled directly on the constitutionality of routine police stops of presumably innocent motorists.
NEWS
December 16, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton is expected to choose former Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt as Interior secretary, transition sources said, rounding out a team to run the nation's natural resources policy that has drawn cheers from environmentalists but profoundly worries Western developers, ranchers and others. Babbitt's appointment could come as early as today, the sources said. Now that Clinton has concluded his two-day economic conference in Little Rock, Ark.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the past two years, Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan Jr. may have amassed the most interesting job-performance record in the Cabinet: Early in his term, he jolted staff aides by reacting with shock and indignation to news that off-road recreational vehicle racing in the California desert at Barstow was damaging the habitat of the endangered desert tortoise--only realizing later that ORVs actually were motorcycles, not full-sized Winnebago trailers and campers.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton completed his final Cabinet selections Wednesday night and prepared to announce them today--choosing Zoe Baird, the general counsel of Aetna Life & Casualty Co., as the nation's first female attorney general and tapping Mickey Kantor, his campaign chairman and a prominent Los Angeles lawyer, as U.S. trade representative, transition officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two recent court decisions ordering the federal government to set aside habitat for endangered animals in Orange County signal a new conflict nationwide between Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt and environmentalists. In court, before Congress and in policy statements, Babbitt has made it clear that he wants to get rid of the so-called critical habitat law, a key part of the Endangered Species Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1993 | From Associated Press
Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr. said Thursday he will leave office without approving a plan to save the northern spotted owl, leaving the controversial decision to the Clinton Administration. "I did not wish to take an action that might bind the hands of the next secretary of the interior," Lujan said in a prepared statement. Environmentalists and the timber industry applauded Lujan's decision to leave the decision to Interior Secretary-designate Bruce Babbitt.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an unnerving couple of days waiting for Bill Clinton to shuffle the last pieces of his Cabinet into place, environmentalists on Thursday got what they most wanted from their Santa Claus in Little Rock, Ark.: Bruce Babbitt as secretary of the Interior. "It is one nice Christmas present, I'll tell you that," said Ben Beach, vice president of the Wilderness Society, one of the mainline environmental groups that had implored Clinton to name the former Arizona governor to the post.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton completed his final Cabinet selections Wednesday night and prepared to announce them today--choosing Zoe Baird, the general counsel of Aetna Life & Casualty Co., as the nation's first female attorney general and tapping Mickey Kantor, his campaign chairman and a prominent Los Angeles lawyer, as U.S. trade representative, transition officials said.
NEWS
December 16, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton is expected to choose former Arizona Gov. Bruce Babbitt as Interior secretary, transition sources said, rounding out a team to run the nation's natural resources policy that has drawn cheers from environmentalists but profoundly worries Western developers, ranchers and others. Babbitt's appointment could come as early as today, the sources said. Now that Clinton has concluded his two-day economic conference in Little Rock, Ark.
NEWS
February 14, 1991 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the past two years, Secretary of the Interior Manuel Lujan Jr. may have amassed the most interesting job-performance record in the Cabinet: Early in his term, he jolted staff aides by reacting with shock and indignation to news that off-road recreational vehicle racing in the California desert at Barstow was damaging the habitat of the endangered desert tortoise--only realizing later that ORVs actually were motorcycles, not full-sized Winnebago trailers and campers.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an unnerving couple of days waiting for Bill Clinton to shuffle the last pieces of his Cabinet into place, environmentalists on Thursday got what they most wanted from their Santa Claus in Little Rock, Ark.: Bruce Babbitt as secretary of the Interior. "It is one nice Christmas present, I'll tell you that," said Ben Beach, vice president of the Wilderness Society, one of the mainline environmental groups that had implored Clinton to name the former Arizona governor to the post.
NEWS
October 3, 1989 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court, acting Monday on nearly 1,000 appeals that had piled up over the summer, announced that it will rule on whether motorists may be stopped by the police at highway checkpoints to see if they are drunk. Despite the growing use of sobriety checkpoints in many states, including California, the high court never has ruled directly on the constitutionality of routine police stops of presumably innocent motorists.
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