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NEWS
March 17, 1995 | DAVID WILLMAN and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno announced Thursday that a review of allegations about Transportation Secretary Federico Pena has ended with no evidence of wrongdoing on his part. In a brief statement, the Justice Department said that the review by its criminal division, opened on Feb. 15, "found no specific and credible evidence of any violation of federal law. Accordingly, the matter has been closed." The Justice Department's statement did not identify which matters involving Pena it reviewed.
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NATIONAL
June 24, 2006 | Johanna Neuman and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writers
Norman Y. Mineta, the only Democrat in President Bush's Cabinet, has resigned as secretary of Transportation, the White House said Friday. In a letter to Bush, Mineta, 74, said that after "over five productive and memorable years, it is time for me to move on to other challenges." Mineta became the first Asian American to serve in the Cabinet when President Clinton named him secretary of Commerce in Clinton's final year in office.
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NEWS
December 24, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton completed his final Cabinet selections Wednesday night and prepared to announce them today--choosing Zoe Baird, the general counsel of Aetna Life & Casualty Co., as the nation's first female attorney general and tapping Mickey Kantor, his campaign chairman and a prominent Los Angeles lawyer, as U.S. trade representative, transition officials said.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | DAVID WILLMAN and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno announced Thursday that a review of allegations about Transportation Secretary Federico Pena has ended with no evidence of wrongdoing on his part. In a brief statement, the Justice Department said that the review by its criminal division, opened on Feb. 15, "found no specific and credible evidence of any violation of federal law. Accordingly, the matter has been closed." The Justice Department's statement did not identify which matters involving Pena it reviewed.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2006 | Johanna Neuman and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writers
Norman Y. Mineta, the only Democrat in President Bush's Cabinet, has resigned as secretary of Transportation, the White House said Friday. In a letter to Bush, Mineta, 74, said that after "over five productive and memorable years, it is time for me to move on to other challenges." Mineta became the first Asian American to serve in the Cabinet when President Clinton named him secretary of Commerce in Clinton's final year in office.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federico F. Pena, named by President-elect Bill Clinton as transportation secretary, has a solid grasp of people-moving problems acquired during a tumultuous, eight-year tenure as Denver's first Latino mayor. But critics suggest that, despite his working knowledge of the issues, Pena has not always made the right decisions--or had the political muscle to translate his ideas into action. Pena, 45, served as the Colorado capital's mayor from 1983 to 1991.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Young, brash and idealistic, Federico F. Pena was twice elected mayor of Denver on waves of optimism driven by campaigns that urged voters to "Imagine a Great City." Throughout his tenure as mayor from 1983 to 1991, he bypassed political machines and asked neighborhood leaders and young professionals for advice in his efforts to revitalize Denver with construction of the world's largest airport, a convention center, a library and major road improvements.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Young, brash and idealistic, Federico F. Pena was twice elected mayor of Denver on waves of optimism driven by campaigns that urged voters to "Imagine a Great City." Throughout his tenure as mayor from 1983 to 1991, he bypassed political machines and asked neighborhood leaders and young professionals for advice in his efforts to revitalize Denver with construction of the world's largest airport, a convention center, a library and major road improvements.
NEWS
December 25, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federico F. Pena, named by President-elect Bill Clinton as transportation secretary, has a solid grasp of people-moving problems acquired during a tumultuous, eight-year tenure as Denver's first Latino mayor. But critics suggest that, despite his working knowledge of the issues, Pena has not always made the right decisions--or had the political muscle to translate his ideas into action. Pena, 45, served as the Colorado capital's mayor from 1983 to 1991.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President-elect Bill Clinton completed his final Cabinet selections Wednesday night and prepared to announce them today--choosing Zoe Baird, the general counsel of Aetna Life & Casualty Co., as the nation's first female attorney general and tapping Mickey Kantor, his campaign chairman and a prominent Los Angeles lawyer, as U.S. trade representative, transition officials said.
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