Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSectarian Violence
IN THE NEWS

Sectarian Violence

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Gunmen killed at least 15 people, most of them Shiite Muslims, in the central province of Punjab, police and witnesses said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the attacks, but police said they appeared to be part of a bloody feud between rival militant groups from the majority Sunni and the minority Shiite sects of Islam. In the first attack, gunmen struck before dawn, killing six Shiites as they slept in a village.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI -- The death toll from sectarian violence in India's northern Uttar Pradesh state increased to 31 Monday as police locked down the area and the prime minister called for calm. A curfew has been imposed, about 13,000 security officers have been deployed to the area and over 100 people were arrested on charges of inciting violence. Schools and shops were closed Monday after hundreds of villagers reportedly fled their homes Sunday or were evacuated by police. Tensions were sparked in late August when a teenage Hindu girl complained to her family that she'd been verbally harassed by a Muslim boy, also a teenager, in another village in Muzaffarnagar district, located in the northern part of India's most populous state, according to local media reports.
Advertisement
WORLD
November 8, 2006 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
Sectarian violence broke out between adjacent Sunni Arab and Shiite Muslim neighborhoods here Tuesday evening, with exchanges of mortar fire and a suicide bombing leaving at least 24 people dead. In addition, authorities discovered at least 20 bodies of men believed to be the victims of death squads. The U.S. military reported Tuesday that an American soldier had died the night before of wounds sustained when a bomb struck his vehicle in northwest Baghdad.
WORLD
April 28, 2013 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
BAGHDAD - The Iraqi government ordered 10 predominantly Sunni Muslim satellite television channels to cease broadcasting Sunday, accusing them of encouraging the sectarian unrest that left more than 200 people dead in a week of violence in northern Iraq. The stations included the pan-Arab news channel Al Jazeera and well-known local satellite stations. The move reflected the elevated tensions in the country since fighting erupted last week between Shiite Muslim-led security forces and Sunni Arab protesters, raising fears of a new civil war like the one that erupted from 2005 to 2008, when U.S. troops were still in the country.
NEWS
March 5, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Nine more people died in scattered violence in India's western state of Gujarat, bringing the death toll from the religious fighting that began last week to 572. Despite the deaths, which occurred in rural areas, an uneasy calm held in most places. "The worst is over," senior state government official Ashok Narayan said. The violence was sparked when a Muslim mob burned a train carrying Hindus. Police said they had arrested four Muslims in connection with the attack.
NEWS
June 25, 2001 | MICHAEL SLACKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The worst sectarian violence in more than a year broke out here recently when a newspaper printed photographs allegedly showing a Coptic Christian monk having sex with parishioners at a site sacred to Copts, who believe it was once visited by Mary, Joseph and the baby Jesus. The spark that propelled thousands of Copts to take to the streets in stone-throwing demonstrations was a report in the newspaper Al Nabaa.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | PAUL MAJENDIE, Reuters
The nation makes world headlines with grim tales of sectarian killings, but the death toll from one of the century's longest guerrilla conflicts is dwarfed by the annual carnage on Northern Ireland's roads. Traffic accidents account for twice as many deaths here. Last year, 93 people were killed in Northern Ireland's sectarian and political conflict as the Irish Republican Army battled to oust Britain. Meanwhile, on the roads, 214 people died.
WORLD
August 28, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
baghdad -- A suicide bomber detonated a vest packed with explosives in a Sunni Arab mosque in Fallouja on Monday, killing 10 worshipers, including the imam, and shattering what had been a period of relative calm for a region that was once the most volatile hotbed of Iraq's insurgency. The attack at the end of evening prayers was blamed on the militant group Al Qaeda in Iraq by American military officials and a Fallouja police official.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Pope John Paul II, arriving here for a pilgrimage to Mt. Sinai, appealed Thursday to Egyptians to reject sectarian violence and live up to their nation's ancient ideal as a tolerant meeting ground for people of all faiths. The Roman Catholic leader and Egypt's highest Islamic authority later had a groundbreaking encounter and voiced agreement on the centrality of religion in human fulfillment. They vowed to meet again in the Vatican later this year.
NEWS
April 4, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, the first Arab leader to meet with President Clinton, visits Washington this week amid increasing turmoil in the Middle East and Egypt's worst wave of sectarian violence since the 1981 assassination of Mubarak's predecessor, Anwar Sadat.
WORLD
March 7, 2013 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ASTORE, Pakistan - The caravan pulled away, leaving behind 19 bullet-riddled bodies in a muddy ditch. Inside the three buses, those spared quietly wept. The remaining Shiite Muslims had just survived a massacre by Sunni Muslim militants. And the Sunnis aboard had just helped save as many of the Shiites as they could. Akhtar Hussain, a 37-year-old Shiite survivor, said he turned to the Sunni passengers when he finally disembarked in this tiny mountain hamlet. "I told them, 'I am grateful to you. If you would have said I was Shiite, I wouldn't be here right now. May God be with you.'" What happened on the remote mountain road in August didn't follow the script.
OPINION
March 9, 2012 | By Lionel Beehner
The U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, Navi Pillay, recently depicted the conflict in Syria as "civil war. " Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton added that there was "every possibility" of civil war breaking out in Syria. Both of these portrayals of the conflict were meant to ratchet up pressure on the international community to prevent further violence. But in fact, describing a conflict as a civil war achieves exactly the opposite effect. It is not a call to arms; it is a call to inaction.
WORLD
December 22, 2011 | By Raheem Salman and Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
  Sirens wailed, smoke billowed and blood pooled on the pavement. The scenes of devastation were all too familiar after more than a dozen explosions ripped through the Iraqi capital Thursday, killing at least 60 people and injuring nearly 200, just days after the last U.S. troops left the country. The attacks, some of the worst in Iraq this year, came in the midst of a political standoff between the country's main Shiite Muslim and Sunni Arab factions. The dispute threatens to unravel a U.S.-backed power-sharing government, and is spreading anxiety over the prospect of a return to the sectarian bloodletting that devastated the country in recent years.
WORLD
February 14, 2011 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
To track the growing political movements gaining strength from the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia across North Africa and the Middle East, one would be well advised to get a planner. There were Saturday's clashes between demonstrators and police in Algeria, now referred to as #feb12 on Twitter, much as Egypt's uprising shall forever be known as #jan25. New popular protests are scheduled Monday in Bahrain (#feb14) and Iran (#25Bahman). Libya comes next on #feb17, followed by Algeria again on #feb19, Morocco #feb20, Cameroon #feb23 and Kuwait #mar8.
WORLD
January 1, 2011 | By Amro Hassan, Los Angeles Times
At least 21 people attending a Christian Mass were killed and 79 injured when a bomb exploded outside an Alexandria church in the first hour of the New Year, Egyptian officials said. The blast struck Coptic worshipers as they exited the Qidiseen, or saints, church just after a New Year's Eve Mass in the eastern section of Alexandria, the ancient city along Egypt's Mediterranean coast. According to the Ministry of Health, all but eight of the injured and all the fatalities were Christians.
WORLD
October 24, 2010 | By Liz Sly, Los Angeles Times
To the Iraqis who were there, the revelations from the WikiLeaks organization that the war they lived through was brutal and bloody have hardly come as a surprise. Americans carelessly opened fire at checkpoints when Iraqis failed to stop. Militias and insurgents roamed the streets, randomly killing members of the other sect. Iraqi security forces rounded up suspects at will and tortured them. Iran infiltrated, armed and influenced the Shiite Muslim militias responsible for thousands of the deaths.
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It started a few years ago in this verdant village of date palms, barley fields and slow-footed water buffalo. Maybe it started the day Gamal Farghali Haridi came home from the university with a beard and a new way of talking. He spoke of God and how a good Muslim life ought to be lived. His friends grew beards too, and things started changing in the village.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | United Press International
A Protestant man was shot to death in front of his family and two others were wounded in a new wave of sectarian violence in Northern Ireland, police said Wednesday.
WORLD
May 20, 2010 | Borzou Daragahi
When American tanks tore through her neighborhood, ripping up the roads as they uprooted a nation, she stayed put, refusing to move abroad like many of her wealthy friends. When the black-clad gunmen took over her religiously mixed west Baghdad neighborhood, turning it into a killing field, she wouldn't let them drive her out of the country she loved. And even when they killed her husband, gunning him down as he left work, she fought through her grief, staying in Iraq and hoping for better times.
WORLD
April 4, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Caesar Ahmed
It was after dark when the men in uniform entered the first home. There they found three men and shot them using silencers. Then they stole the victims' van and drove to the next house and killed again. Within an hour, the gunmen had methodically made their way through four homes and killed 25 people. Their work done, they left on foot Friday evening, disappearing into the palm trees and orange groves of the Hawr Rajab district south of Baghdad. Many of the victims had been part of the U.S.-backed Awakening movement, Sunni Arab paramilitary groups that took a stand against the militant group Al Qaeda in Iraq and played a key role in the 2007 American troop buildup to fight the insurgency.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|