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Secular Humanism

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
As the largest organization of American atheists, agnostics and other religious skeptics gathered in Los Angeles this weekend, there was a predictable amount of scorn heaped on Christians, Jews and Muslims. Religion was dismissed as "nonsense" and "superstition"; those who believe were described variously as "ignorant" and "stupid. " Fellow nonbelievers were not spared, however, as lines were drawn between "new atheists," who encourage open confrontation with the devout, and "accommodationists," who prefer a subtler, more tactical approach.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Philosopher Paul Kurtz was called many unflattering names during his long career, including "Satanic free-thinker" and "dangerous corrupter of young minds. " But the name some of his critics considered most damning was the one he most prized. They called him a secular humanist. "You can call me a skeptic, a non-theist, an atheist, an agnostic, a skeptical, agnostic atheist, but the best term," Kurtz, a champion of science and debunker of religions and the supernatural, told the Associated Press years ago, "is secular humanist.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Philosopher Paul Kurtz was called many unflattering names during his long career, including "Satanic free-thinker" and "dangerous corrupter of young minds. " But the name some of his critics considered most damning was the one he most prized. They called him a secular humanist. "You can call me a skeptic, a non-theist, an atheist, an agnostic, a skeptical, agnostic atheist, but the best term," Kurtz, a champion of science and debunker of religions and the supernatural, told the Associated Press years ago, "is secular humanist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
As the largest organization of American atheists, agnostics and other religious skeptics gathered in Los Angeles this weekend, there was a predictable amount of scorn heaped on Christians, Jews and Muslims. Religion was dismissed as "nonsense" and "superstition"; those who believe were described variously as "ignorant" and "stupid. " Fellow nonbelievers were not spared, however, as lines were drawn between "new atheists," who encourage open confrontation with the devout, and "accommodationists," who prefer a subtler, more tactical approach.
NEWS
January 13, 1985
The Education Department, following legislation approved by Congress last summer, has proposed a rule prohibiting school districts from spending certain federal funds on any course that a district "determines is secular humanism." However, the proposal does not say what it means by "secular humanism," used by some fundamentalist and conservative groups to describe the teachings of atheism and Darwinism.
NEWS
January 8, 1985 | United Press International
A First Amendment education group today urged the Department of Education to drop a proposed regulation denying funds to school programs that teach "secular humanism." The proposed regulation to govern the Magnet Schools Assistance Program would deny funds for "any course of instruction the substance of which the LEA (local education agency) determines is secular humanism." Secular humanism has emerged as a rallying cry for the "Religious Right's" criticism of public education.
NEWS
March 4, 1987 | United Press International
In a case that pitted the religious right against civil libertarians, a federal judge ordered at least 35 textbooks removed from Alabama's public schools today because they promote the "godless religion" of secular humanism. U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand issued a 172-page ruling that listed at least 35 books--most social studies texts--that he said violated First Amendment rights against establishment of a religion by the state. "These books are not to be used as primary textbooks . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1987 | United Press International
Two civil liberties groups representing parents of Alabama public schoolchildren said Friday that they will appeal last week's court ruling banning 44 texts that allegedly promote the "religion" of secular humanism. The American Civil Liberties Union and People for the American Way also warned that the decision by U.S. District Court Judge W. Brevard Hand will unleash a host of challenges to public school education by Christian fundamentalists seeking to promote their sectarian views.
OPINION
March 8, 1987
The decision by a federal judge in Mobile, Ala., that secular humanism is a religion and must be banned from school textbooks defies reason and turns logic on its head. Whatever "secular humanism" may be--and no one is exactly sure what it is--it is certainly not a religion in any recognized sense of that word. Ordering textbooks removed from classrooms on these flimsy grounds is inconceivable, yet U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand has both conceived it and done it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1985
The hotly debated proposal to expand Family Life curriculum in the Capistrano Valley Unified School District should be a flag for parents and taxpayers everywhere to find out exactly what schools are teaching our children. Many parents are questioning the judgment and ethics of school districts administering therapy education (Program Self-Esteem, value clarification) to children without their knowledge or consent. The district proposal for the Family Life curriculum, which includes abortion as a means of birth control, homosexuality as an alternate life style, value clarification as a decision-making process and suicide education, embraces a philosophy of secular humanism--one that believes in no absolutes, no right or wrong and that moral values are self-determined and situational.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2009 | Mikael Wood
"Look at where we live!" Billie Joe Armstrong, the frontman of Oakland pop-punk veteran Green Day, exclaimed Tuesday night at the Forum, where he spent considerable time extolling the virtues of life in California after spending two months on the road. The show capped the band's North American tour in support of its latest album, "21st Century Breakdown," the follow-up to its Grammy winning epic "American Idiot." "We've just gotta get rid of Arnold Schwarzenegger," Armstrong continued, riling the already enthusiastic crowd.
OPINION
February 9, 2003 | Mohamed A. Najmi, Mohamed A. Najmi, a former sociology professor, lives in Irvine.
Today the United States reverberates with drumbeats of war, first against Osama, and now against Saddam. But there also is a dark, palpable aspersion against Islam. As Americans hear of terror erupting from all corners of the globe, U.S. Muslims are made to feel as if they have something to explain: Are they responsible for what is being done in the name of their religion? "No people can be explained by their national religion. They do not feel responsible for it; it lies outside of them."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2000 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Why is this Seder different from all other Seders? At a Passover ritual feast near Griffith Park this week, the unleavened bread was laid out just as it has been for more than 3,000 years. The traditional songs were sung, the four questions asked about why Passover is different from all other nights as a gathering of 300 people celebrated the timeless story of the Jewish people's exodus from Egypt and liberation from slavery.
NEWS
November 18, 1998 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The air was tense as the audience rallied for questions after a panel discussion on religion and public schools. An arsenal of explosive issues threatened to burst on the UC Irvine campus where the group had gathered. All the more reason why the first query came as such a surprise. "Do you teach humanism?" asked a middle-aged woman in a quiet voice. The answer was just as unlikely.
NEWS
August 31, 1993 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commenting on one of the nation's most sensitive topics, President Clinton said Monday that he fears American society may have become "entirely too secular" and warned against the tendency of many politically liberal Americans to mistrust those who take public positions based on religious convictions. "The people of faith in this country ought to be able to say that" religion shapes their approach to public debate without someone saying, " 'Oh, you're just being a right-winger,' " Clinton said.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The God Problem started nagging at Gregory and Sandra Weber some time after 1 a.m. on June 12, 1990. Until then, religion had really not been an issue. The couple lived and worked in Davis--a Northern California town that he describes as "the antithesis of the Bible Belt." But early that morning, Alissa Weber came into the world. And her parents, who don't believe in a deity, unexpectedly found themselves in a spiritual dilemma.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | Associated Press
A federal appeals court Wednesday reversed an Alabama judge's order that had banned 44 textbooks from Alabama public schools for promoting what the judge called a godless, humanistic religion. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand's order had turned the First Amendment requirement that the government be neutral on the subject of religion "into an affirmative obligation to speak about religion."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1991 | Associated Press
An article in the fall issue of Free Inquiry, a secular humanist magazine, says that teaching young children to believe in Santa Claus is deceitful and may be blunting their imaginations. Judith Boss, who teaches in the University of Rhode Island philosophy department, writes: "In telling children Santa Claus is a real human, we are not engaging children's imaginations. We are simply lying to them."
NEWS
October 1, 1991 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case that is likely to pit creationists against scientists, a high school biology teacher on Monday filed a $5 million federal suit against the Capistrano Unified School District, claiming that school officials violated his constitutional rights by forcing him to teach evolution.
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