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WORLD
November 5, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
About 12,000 Turkish nationalists marched in the capital, Ankara, vowing to defend the secular regime against radical Islamic influences and urging the government not to make too many concessions to gain European Union membership. Turkey is predominantly Muslim but is governed by strict laws that separate religion and state. Many fear that if left unchecked, Islamic fundamentalism will lead to a theocracy.
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OPINION
February 3, 2010
France is a militantly secular state that is determined to remain culturally homogeneous. While holding dear the ideals of equality and human rights, the country also widely embraces assimilation -- the belief that to be French, immigrants and nationals alike must adhere to the language, customs, values and all-around French way of life. That is why France banned religious head scarves in public schools in 2004, and why lawmakers now want to prohibit women from wearing burkas or full-face veils in public places such as city halls and post offices, and possibly even parks and subways.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2001
Kudos to you on "Terrorism Among Friends" (editorial, Oct. 4). Having served 30 years in the Indian Air Force and seen, visited and studied all the adjoining countries, including Pakistan and the then USSR, and having been posted in Kashmir, I can say that your editorial is extremely pragmatic and realistic as matters "stand in the field." There is only one thing that I wish to correct and would appreciate seeing in future editorials in which reference to India is made. India is a multi-religious, secular democracy.
WORLD
January 18, 2008 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Since 1823, it has been a chamber of civilized, if sometimes outrageous, debate. In the shelter of the Oxford Union's weathered mahogany wainscoting, long oak benches and high, leaded glass windows, Malcolm X called for black empowerment "by any means necessary."
OPINION
August 7, 1994 | Paula R. Newberg, Paula R. Newberg is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She recently returned from South Asia
When Muslim clerics in Bangladesh labeled feminist writer Taslima Nasrin a blasphemer and called for her execution, they set off a chain reaction whose consequences are still unfolding. Mass demonstrations in the capital of Dhaka alternately support and condemn Nasrin's controversial novel "Lajja" (Shame). Secular women's organizations defend her right to free expression; conservative ones criticize her beliefs. The Nasrin affair is about women's rights as well as free speech.
NEWS
November 11, 1990 | ALIZA MARCUS, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
When it comes to finding a job, Fatma Bostan, a graduate student studying public administration at Turkey's elite Bosphorus University, should not have a problem. Well-educated and fluent in English, this 25-year-old woman seems to offer most of the skills a potential employer would want. But there is one problem: In accordance with Islamic law, not a wisp of hair peeks out of the scarf well-wrapped around her head and neck, and over her clothes she wears a long, loose coat.
OPINION
August 8, 2006
Re "Lamont Went From Zero to Favorite in 7 Months," Aug. 6 As a lifetime Democrat, I would be happy to see Sen. Joe Lieberman (D-Conn.) go down in flames. He lost my support in 2000 when he stated, "The Constitution guarantees freedom of religion, not freedom from religion." It is because of religion, religious hatred, that is, that our world is now in the throes of unrelenting warfare atrocities. Lieberman's unwavering support of President Bush's totally unnecessary war, a war that is going to end with Iraq being a theocracy instead of a secular state, is certainly the last straw.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1992
In 1948 militant Hindus plotted and killed the Mahatma Gandhi, not only to silence the voice of secularism but to convert India into a racist and communal Hindu nation. However, because of Nehru and Indira Gandhi and other Hindu national leaders, India remained a secular nation for the last 43 years. But with the demolition of the Babri Masjid in Ayodhya, the militant Hindus have achieved their goal of changing India from a secular state to a nation of anarchy and darkness, controlled by Hindu fanatics.
OPINION
February 3, 2010
France is a militantly secular state that is determined to remain culturally homogeneous. While holding dear the ideals of equality and human rights, the country also widely embraces assimilation -- the belief that to be French, immigrants and nationals alike must adhere to the language, customs, values and all-around French way of life. That is why France banned religious head scarves in public schools in 2004, and why lawmakers now want to prohibit women from wearing burkas or full-face veils in public places such as city halls and post offices, and possibly even parks and subways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1988
According to William Pfaff ("In One Stroke, Palestine Exists," Op-Ed Page, Aug. 3) there is now a Palestinian state, courtesy of King Hussein of Jordan, albeit now under Israeli military occupation. In my opinion, the only way the Palestinian problem can be settled peacefully is for religion to be eliminated from the equation. A theocracy like Israel is an anachronism in the modern world. It should become a secular state and a true democracy with a constitution guaranteeing complete freedom of religion and equal civil rights for all. It could then annex the West Bank and Gaza and incorporate them into the state of Israel, and all the exiled Palestinians could return to their native land and become full citizens.
WORLD
November 5, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
About 12,000 Turkish nationalists marched in the capital, Ankara, vowing to defend the secular regime against radical Islamic influences and urging the government not to make too many concessions to gain European Union membership. Turkey is predominantly Muslim but is governed by strict laws that separate religion and state. Many fear that if left unchecked, Islamic fundamentalism will lead to a theocracy.
OPINION
August 8, 2006
Re "Lamont Went From Zero to Favorite in 7 Months," Aug. 6 As a lifetime Democrat, I would be happy to see Sen. Joe Lieberman (D-Conn.) go down in flames. He lost my support in 2000 when he stated, "The Constitution guarantees freedom of religion, not freedom from religion." It is because of religion, religious hatred, that is, that our world is now in the throes of unrelenting warfare atrocities. Lieberman's unwavering support of President Bush's totally unnecessary war, a war that is going to end with Iraq being a theocracy instead of a secular state, is certainly the last straw.
OPINION
September 15, 2005 | Timothy Garton Ash, TIMOTHY GARTON ASH is the professor of European studies at Oxford University and a Hoover Institution senior fellow.
SITTING IN THE CAPITAL of the Islamic Republic of Iran, with a metal arrow on the ceiling of my hotel room pointing to Mecca, I feel impelled to write about our troubles with Islam. Four years after the Sept. 11 attacks on New York and Washington, which were perpetrated in the name of Allah, most people in what we still loosely call the West would agree that we do have troubles with Islam. Why? What's the nub of the problem?
OPINION
October 28, 2002
Re "Prejudice and Politics Mix in Slurs on Israel," Commentary, Oct. 24: I would like Norah Vincent to explain what is "hysterical" about pacifism (a belief held sacred by millions of Hindus, Buddhists, Quakers and others, including Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr.) and multiculturalism (the idea that no one culture has a monopoly on truth or goodness). I also wonder what her definition of postmodernism is, and whether she would dismiss every bit of Marxist doctrine -- for example, the belief that capitalists derive their wealth by paying labor less than it produces, a proposition shared by Marx and Adam Smith, the founder of capitalism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2001
Kudos to you on "Terrorism Among Friends" (editorial, Oct. 4). Having served 30 years in the Indian Air Force and seen, visited and studied all the adjoining countries, including Pakistan and the then USSR, and having been posted in Kashmir, I can say that your editorial is extremely pragmatic and realistic as matters "stand in the field." There is only one thing that I wish to correct and would appreciate seeing in future editorials in which reference to India is made. India is a multi-religious, secular democracy.
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new army chief has vowed to keep up the battle against Islamic fundamentalism in Turkey, quashing widespread speculation that, under his command, the rigidly pro-secular armed forces would take a softer approach to the resurgent Islamist movement and keep out of politics. Gen.
NEWS
August 31, 1998 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The new army chief has vowed to keep up the battle against Islamic fundamentalism in Turkey, quashing widespread speculation that, under his command, the rigidly pro-secular armed forces would take a softer approach to the resurgent Islamist movement and keep out of politics. Gen.
OPINION
October 28, 2002
Re "Prejudice and Politics Mix in Slurs on Israel," Commentary, Oct. 24: I would like Norah Vincent to explain what is "hysterical" about pacifism (a belief held sacred by millions of Hindus, Buddhists, Quakers and others, including Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King Jr.) and multiculturalism (the idea that no one culture has a monopoly on truth or goodness). I also wonder what her definition of postmodernism is, and whether she would dismiss every bit of Marxist doctrine -- for example, the belief that capitalists derive their wealth by paying labor less than it produces, a proposition shared by Marx and Adam Smith, the founder of capitalism.
OPINION
August 7, 1994 | Paula R. Newberg, Paula R. Newberg is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She recently returned from South Asia
When Muslim clerics in Bangladesh labeled feminist writer Taslima Nasrin a blasphemer and called for her execution, they set off a chain reaction whose consequences are still unfolding. Mass demonstrations in the capital of Dhaka alternately support and condemn Nasrin's controversial novel "Lajja" (Shame). Secular women's organizations defend her right to free expression; conservative ones criticize her beliefs. The Nasrin affair is about women's rights as well as free speech.
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