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Securitate Romanian Secret Service

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December 26, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife, Elena, were executed Monday after a secret trial, state television announced, as the capital that Ceausescu long had terrorized settled into an uneasy calm. Throughout the day, Romanian television and radio broadcasts reported that Ceausescu was being held in an undisclosed location. His whereabouts had been the subject of rumor and speculation since Friday, when he fled the capital in the face of mass demonstrations. Shortly before 9 p.m.
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NEWS
January 14, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Romania appeared to be edging closer to martial law Saturday as the military took over in the regional capital of Timisoara, and the ruling National Salvation Front came under renewed attack for its past Communist connections. The state news agency Rompres announced the military takeover in Timisoara, where the Romanian revolution was born in protests that began Dec. 16 and six days later toppled dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. The news agency said that Maj. Gen.
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NEWS
January 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Captured members of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu's feared security police went on trial before military courts Monday, charged with trying to crush the uprising that ended his 24-year reign last month. The first such "terrorist"--as the new Romanian government calls them--to be convicted was found guilty of attempted murder and sentenced to nine years in prison, state radio reported. The defendant, identified as police Maj.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronted by thousands of angry protesters who had come together for a day of national mourning, interim President Ion Iliescu declared Friday that the Communist Party of Romania has been outlawed. Speaking from a balcony at the Foreign Ministry in Bucharest, where the new government makes its headquarters, Iliescu said, "The Romanian Communist Party is outlawed, considering that it is against the national spirit and our ancestors' law." "Down with communism! Down with Communists!"
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The provisional government of Romania on Wednesday warned secret- police snipers still holding out in Romanian cities to surrender by nightfall today or face death by firing squad if they are captured. But after five days of skirmishes between the army and bands of secret police left over from the regime of executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, Bucharest and other major cities were mostly quiet.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | DAN FISHER and RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For years, they scurried like rats through secret tunnels in the belly of Bucharest. Called the Securitate, they were the loyal protectors of Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. His execution, reported Monday, robbed them of their boss but not what they saw as their mission. Fanatics among them are expected to fight to their own deaths. "If they don't get captured or killed," predicted one longtime student of East European and Slavic affairs, "they'll commit suicide."
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Confronted by thousands of angry protesters who had come together for a day of national mourning, interim President Ion Iliescu declared Friday that the Communist Party of Romania has been outlawed. Speaking from a balcony at the Foreign Ministry in Bucharest, where the new government makes its headquarters, Iliescu said, "The Romanian Communist Party is outlawed, considering that it is against the national spirit and our ancestors' law." "Down with communism! Down with Communists!"
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Romania appeared to be edging closer to martial law Saturday as the military took over in the regional capital of Timisoara, and the ruling National Salvation Front came under renewed attack for its past Communist connections. The state news agency Rompres announced the military takeover in Timisoara, where the Romanian revolution was born in protests that began Dec. 16 and six days later toppled dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. The news agency said that Maj. Gen.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all but the last two weeks of this year, Communist Eastern Europe passed through one of the most remarkable political transformations in modern history, a massive upheaval that was accomplished with hardly a shot fired. The peaceful nature of the process was all the more remarkable for the fact that Communists in Poland, Hungary, East Germany, Bulgaria and Czechoslovakia had either been installed or held onto power through four decades by either outright violence or systematic coercion.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Romanian government announced Monday that it has abolished the death penalty, disbanded Nicolae Ceausescu's hated secret police, the Securitate, and will introduce a five-day workweek. A week after Ceausescu, 71, and his wife, Elena, were executed by a military firing squad, the revocation of the death penalty and other steps were made public by interim President Ion Iliescu in a New Year's television address. "The two executions will be the last to be carried out," he said.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Captured members of dictator Nicolae Ceausescu's feared security police went on trial before military courts Monday, charged with trying to crush the uprising that ended his 24-year reign last month. The first such "terrorist"--as the new Romanian government calls them--to be convicted was found guilty of attempted murder and sentenced to nine years in prison, state radio reported. The defendant, identified as police Maj.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new Romanian government announced Monday that it has abolished the death penalty, disbanded Nicolae Ceausescu's hated secret police, the Securitate, and will introduce a five-day workweek. A week after Ceausescu, 71, and his wife, Elena, were executed by a military firing squad, the revocation of the death penalty and other steps were made public by interim President Ion Iliescu in a New Year's television address. "The two executions will be the last to be carried out," he said.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | RONE TEMPEST and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The provisional government of Romania on Wednesday warned secret- police snipers still holding out in Romanian cities to surrender by nightfall today or face death by firing squad if they are captured. But after five days of skirmishes between the army and bands of secret police left over from the regime of executed dictator Nicolae Ceausescu, Bucharest and other major cities were mostly quiet.
NEWS
December 28, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all but the last two weeks of this year, Communist Eastern Europe passed through one of the most remarkable political transformations in modern history, a massive upheaval that was accomplished with hardly a shot fired. The peaceful nature of the process was all the more remarkable for the fact that Communists in Poland, Hungary, East Germany, Bulgaria and Czechoslovakia had either been installed or held onto power through four decades by either outright violence or systematic coercion.
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | DAN FISHER and RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For years, they scurried like rats through secret tunnels in the belly of Bucharest. Called the Securitate, they were the loyal protectors of Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu. His execution, reported Monday, robbed them of their boss but not what they saw as their mission. Fanatics among them are expected to fight to their own deaths. "If they don't get captured or killed," predicted one longtime student of East European and Slavic affairs, "they'll commit suicide."
NEWS
December 26, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceausescu and his wife, Elena, were executed Monday after a secret trial, state television announced, as the capital that Ceausescu long had terrorized settled into an uneasy calm. Throughout the day, Romanian television and radio broadcasts reported that Ceausescu was being held in an undisclosed location. His whereabouts had been the subject of rumor and speculation since Friday, when he fled the capital in the face of mass demonstrations. Shortly before 9 p.m.
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