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Securities Exchange Act Of 1934

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BUSINESS
June 29, 1995 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Wednesday adopted a bill making it more difficult for investors to prevail in securities fraud lawsuits, a measure that backers contend would deter frivolous suits but critics say would prevent legitimate recoveries by victims of deceit. Proponents of the bill, a version of which has already cleared the House, fended off numerous Democratic attempts to amend it, including one that would have granted investors more time to initiate legal action.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
May 5, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
Every time I hear a big industry crab about how some new set of government regulations will mean the end to life as we know it, bring the economy crashing down around our heads, or burden the consumer with more passed-on costs, I think of the smartest words Ronald Reagan ever spoke. They were: "There you go again." Reagan and I wouldn't have seen eye to eye on much, but this phrase sums up my exact reaction to the arguments by the financial industry and its chums in Washington against the financial regulation bill now before Congress.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2010 | Michael Hiltzik
Every time I hear a big industry crab about how some new set of government regulations will mean the end to life as we know it, bring the economy crashing down around our heads, or burden the consumer with more passed-on costs, I think of the smartest words Ronald Reagan ever spoke. They were: "There you go again." Reagan and I wouldn't have seen eye to eye on much, but this phrase sums up my exact reaction to the arguments by the financial industry and its chums in Washington against the financial regulation bill now before Congress.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1995 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate on Wednesday adopted a bill making it more difficult for investors to prevail in securities fraud lawsuits, a measure that backers contend would deter frivolous suits but critics say would prevent legitimate recoveries by victims of deceit. Proponents of the bill, a version of which has already cleared the House, fended off numerous Democratic attempts to amend it, including one that would have granted investors more time to initiate legal action.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1985
The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, sought to block an SEC proposal to subject bank brokerage activities to SEC regulation. The complaint argued that banks specifically are excluded from the definitions of broker and dealer contained in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1985
Philip S. Wilson was permanently barred from Chicago Board of Options Exchange membership and association with exchange members. He was found by the exchange's business conduct committee and board of directors to have violated two exchange rules. One pertains to just and equitable principles of trade, the other to adherence to federal securities law. He also was found guilty of violating the anti-fraud provisions of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2001
Golden Systems Inc. has filed its annual report for the fiscal year ended March 31 with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Because of the company's difficult financial situation, and delays in completing an audit in India using generally accepted accounting principles, the 2000 audit was delayed and the annual report and the audit were not completed until recently. Sales for fiscal year 2000 were $4.68 million, compared with $3.94 million for 1999.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court ruled today that disputes between investors who allege fraud and their brokers must be resolved by arbitration, not in court suits. By a 5-4 vote, the justices overturned a 1953 high court decision that permitted lawsuits under an anti-fraud provision of the Securities Act of 1933. In its history, the high court has reversed itself fewer than 200 times. Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, writing for the court, said the 1953 decision "has fallen far out of step with our current strong endorsement" of federal laws that favor arbitration.
NEWS
February 12, 2002 | RICHARD SIMON and EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rep. Henry A. Waxman has doggedly pursued an investigation into Enron Corp.'s political influence, but as a member of the House minority without subpoena power, the Los Angeles Democrat has been able to go only so far. On Monday, he appealed to Rep. Dan Burton (R-Ind.), chairman of the Government Reform Committee, to launch a probe of Enron's political activities--and do it with the same zeal used to investigate President Clinton's campaign fund-raising.
OPINION
June 17, 1990 | BRUCE FEIN and EDWIN MEESE III, Bruce Fein is a constitutional lawyer in Washington. Former U.S. Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III is a distinguished fellow of the Heritage Foundation.
The hyper-zealous enforcement of so-called insider trading laws by the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission justify a twist on the words of Winston Churchill: Never have so many expended so much effort for so little. Insider trading prohibitions in connection with the commercial purchase or sale of securities is akin to requiring war to be fought by Queensbury Rules. They should be abolished.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1991 | CATHERINE COLLINS, CATHERINE COLLINS is a Washington writer
How much is a CEO worth and who decides? Those issues are at the heart of a companion bill introduced in Congress by Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) and Rep. John Bryant (D-Tex.). The measure would give stockholders a bigger say in the compensation of corporate executives. "American CEOs are paid 100 times more than the average American worker," said Levin, chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Oversight of Government Management.
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