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BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
In a move that highlights how closely its fortunes are tied to the U.S., Brazil's stock exchanges on Wednesday shifted trading hours so they won't be whipsawed by wild market swings before U.S. stocks start trading. The Sao Paulo stock exchange, known as the Bovespa index, and the Rio de Janeiro exchange delayed opening by two hours to noon, or 9 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, and extended closing by one hour to 6 p.m., or 3 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 2000 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The future of Hong Kong's new second-tier stock market looks impressive. It caters to small, smart high-tech companies looking for cash in a city busy reinventing itself as Asia's Silicon Valley. Hong Kong's treasure chest of investment capital and business savvy also seems a ready-made resource for a Chinese mainland economy rich in new ideas but short on money to develop them.
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BUSINESS
August 14, 1990 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf crisis sent stock prices tumbling throughout Asian markets Monday as the threat of war and higher energy prices fueled worries of a slowdown in the world's fastest growing economic region. Fears that inflation would push up interest rates in Japan helped send share prices on the Tokyo Stock Exchange down by 4.2%, the biggest drop in two years. On other Asian exchanges, share prices dropped 5.8% in Taiwan, the biggest loss in two years; 4% in Singapore; 1.5% in Seoul, to a record low, and 3.7% in Manila.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Asia's battered stock markets suffered renewed heavy selling early today after Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin sacked his government--creating more uncertainty for already jittery world financial markets. In Tokyo, the benchmark Nikkei-225 stock index--which had risen 1.2% last week--was off 408.69 points, or 2.7%, to 14,889.51 at midday. "Russian instability and U.S. market volatility" are pressuring the market, said Dhia Amir, senior trader at Nomura Securities Co. in Tokyo.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Asian stock markets plummeted early today and markets worldwide braced for a shock after Barings, parent of Britain's oldest investment bank and a major global stock trader, filed for bankruptcy protection late Sunday. The venerable bank disclosed that it has lost more than $789 million in "massive, unauthorized" trading of Asian derivative securities, wiping out its capital.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Asia's battered stock markets suffered renewed heavy selling early today after Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin sacked his government--creating more uncertainty for already jittery world financial markets. In Tokyo, the benchmark Nikkei-225 stock index--which had risen 1.2% last week--was off 408.69 points, or 2.7%, to 14,889.51 at midday. "Russian instability and U.S. market volatility" are pressuring the market, said Dhia Amir, senior trader at Nomura Securities Co. in Tokyo.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1994 | JAMES BATES and TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Asian stock markets fell in early trading today, the first day of activity after Friday's 96.24-point drop in the Dow Jones Industrial Average. Analysts said the selloff was mostly a knee-jerk reaction to the American market's slide, but that investors were also worried that the U.S. Federal Reserve's shift to tighter credit could slow global economic growth--which would affect booming Asian export economies. New Zealand's key stock index fell 47.74 points to 2,365.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
Asian stock markets were lower in afternoon trading today after an upbeat U.S. employment report released Friday rekindled concern that the Federal Reserve will raise short-term rates again to keep inflation in check. Far East investors' reaction deepened worries that U.S. stocks will dive today. Most U.S. markets were closed on Good Friday, leaving domestic investors three days to contemplate their next moves. In afternoon trading in Tokyo, the Nikkei stock index was off 269.46 points, or 1.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Asian Markets Open '94 Higher: Hong Kong stocks shot up to a record of 12,036 on the Hang Seng index early today, but by midday the index was up a modest 37.69 points from the 1993 close, to 11,926.08. In Singapore, stocks jumped at the opening bell and were trading at new highs in midmorning, with the Straits Times index up 25.38 points to a record 2,451.06. In Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the composite stock index was up 7.38 points to a record 1,282.70 in morning trade.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The persistent worries about Asia's future are shifting to economic giant Japan, where the top finance bureaucrat admitted Friday that the economy has come to a "standstill" and unsettling bank rumors helped send the Tokyo stock market plunging. The angst was worsened by a fresh wave of downbeat assessments warning that the currency and market turmoil sweeping Southeast Asia and Korea will inevitably take its toll in the country and could even imperil efforts to reform Japan's economic system.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1998 | TOM PETRUNO
Finally, there is a light at the end of the tunnel. No, we're not talking about the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and L.A.'s subway-to-nowhere. We mean the dark tunnel into which emerging-market stocks have been plunging for much of the last year. There's a way to stop the insanity, and the Hong Kong Monetary Authority, that city-state's de facto central bank, has figured it out: When your market goes down, you simply make your government the stock buyer of last resort.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Investors fled South Korean markets in growing numbers early today amid fear that the $57-billion bailout by the International Monetary Fund won't be enough to prevent widespread defaults on loans by banks and industrial firms.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Mutual-fund groups using special methods to price their Asian shares after the October market plunge better protected investors from speculators than did funds using conventional pricing, a Securities and Exchange Commission review found Thursday. The findings appear to vindicate Fidelity Investments and other fund groups that used much-criticized "fair-value" pricing after the Dow Jones industrial average fell 7.2%, or 554 points, on Oct. 27.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1997 | Bloomberg News
European stocks rose, led by Germany, as a rebound in Japanese shares eased fears of a meltdown in Asian markets and a strengthening U.S. dollar helped boost shares of exporters. Japanese stocks gained for a second day, led by banks and brokerages, amid optimism the government will apply strong measures to bail out the country's faltering financial industry. Tokyo's benchmark Nikkei-225 index rose 3.5% to 16,603.20 points.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1997 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The persistent worries about Asia's future are shifting to economic giant Japan, where the top finance bureaucrat admitted Friday that the economy has come to a "standstill" and unsettling bank rumors helped send the Tokyo stock market plunging. The angst was worsened by a fresh wave of downbeat assessments warning that the currency and market turmoil sweeping Southeast Asia and Korea will inevitably take its toll in the country and could even imperil efforts to reform Japan's economic system.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Time for a reality check. Last week's turmoil in stock markets around the world gave rise to more scary stories than Halloween. One grim projection by experts said that U.S. business could write off Asia as a market for a long time because stock market losses coming on top of currency devaluations had destroyed purchasing power in the region.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1997 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Time for a reality check. Last week's turmoil in stock markets around the world gave rise to more scary stories than Halloween. One grim projection by experts said that U.S. business could write off Asia as a market for a long time because stock market losses coming on top of currency devaluations had destroyed purchasing power in the region.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1997 | Bloomberg News
European stocks rose, led by Germany, as a rebound in Japanese shares eased fears of a meltdown in Asian markets and a strengthening U.S. dollar helped boost shares of exporters. Japanese stocks gained for a second day, led by banks and brokerages, amid optimism the government will apply strong measures to bail out the country's faltering financial industry. Tokyo's benchmark Nikkei-225 index rose 3.5% to 16,603.20 points.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
In a move that highlights how closely its fortunes are tied to the U.S., Brazil's stock exchanges on Wednesday shifted trading hours so they won't be whipsawed by wild market swings before U.S. stocks start trading. The Sao Paulo stock exchange, known as the Bovespa index, and the Rio de Janeiro exchange delayed opening by two hours to noon, or 9 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, and extended closing by one hour to 6 p.m., or 3 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1995 | TOM PETRUNO
Naturally, nobody wants to avert his or her eyes from the streaking U.S. stock market this year. But sometimes the smartest long-term investment moves are made away from the pack--buying what's down rather than what's already up. For disappointment or just plain dullness, it's been hard to do worse than in key Asian stock markets over the past two years. And therein lies an opportunity, some Wall Streeters say. In 1994, five of eight major Asian markets suffered steep declines.
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