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Securities Industry China

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BUSINESS
January 24, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
China Sells $400 Million in Bonds: It was the nation's first international debt sale in two years and included some bonds due a century from now. China, which said it had no immediate plans for the money it raised, is seeking to boost U.S. investors' interest in its debt. China attracted buyers to its first sale of Yankee bonds--or dollar-denominated bonds sold in the United States by a foreign entity--by offering juicy yields and including sought-after century bonds in the mix.
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BUSINESS
February 28, 2001 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's so much excitement over the government's decision to let Chinese buy the same stocks as foreigners that officials had to postpone the starting date until today to let banks and securities houses prepare for the onslaught. China hopes the move will give a shot in the arm to one of the world's only Communist-run stock markets--and Asia's third largest--and pave the way for a unified stock market that would eventually be open to all investors. The government announced its plans Feb.
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BUSINESS
November 27, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Finance Ministry to Investigate Securities Market: Officials plan a nationwide investigation of the securities industry as part of their effort to beef up supervision and reinforce financial regulations. The campaign, front-page news in Chinese newspapers last week, comes in the wake of efforts by the China's securities regulators to curb rampant speculation in futures markets. Some analysts said the investigation was a step in the right direction but that it's not likely to end speculation.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1997 | From Associated Press
Suggesting that China may be skirting U.S. disclosure laws in stock sales of big government-owned companies, a senior House lawmaker has asked the government's top securities regulator to take action. Rep. Gerald Solomon (R-N.Y.), who heads the House Rules Committee, recently told the chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, Arthur Levitt, that the Chinese actions represent "a potential threat to our country."
BUSINESS
June 27, 1994 | From Bloomberg Business News
A week after the government announced a sweeping crackdown on futures trading, the young brokers in their red vests are still busy fielding phone calls at the Beijing Commodities Exchange. Occasionally, a group bursts into applause as prices jump again. Free-market dissidents? Derivative disobedients? Hardly. While trading copper and grain keeps some of the traders busy, it is treasury bond futures that keep the phone lines humming.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1992
As I read Rholan Wong's "Full-Time Fatherhood: Hardest Job of All" (Sept. 6), I was relieved to know that there are other fathers who love their children as much as I do. I could relate to Wong in many ways as I have been home taking care of my son (to be 4 in December) when my wife had to work. I have grown to love him like I never knew (love) before. I sometimes think about him when he is not with me and wonder what I would do if something bad happened to him.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
China apparently intends to adopt international standards as it develops a legal and regulatory framework for its fledgling stock markets, Richard Breeden, chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, said Monday. "It seems clear to me from the discussions we have had that . . . they have every intention of expanding markets," Breeden said after three days of talks with banking and securities officials.
NEWS
May 31, 1997 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask C.Y. Liu what it is about Beijing Enterprises Holding Ltd. that made him wait in a snaking line three separate times to apply for stock in the new company, and he offers the reasoning that has made many small-time investors here rich. "I don't know anything about it," he says, checking his pager's tiny screen for the latest stock report. "But the price is going to double, maybe triple."
BUSINESS
June 29, 1996 | From Reuters
The copper trading scandal widened Friday with reports that Chinese companies and trader Yasuo Hamanaka had sought to rig world copper prices and news that Japan will open its own criminal inquiry, following the lead of the United States and Britain. That represents a reversal of Japan's stance earlier, that none of its laws could have been broken because the unauthorized copper trades that produced $1.8 billion in losses for the Japanese company Sumitomo Corp. were conducted outside Japan.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
China Sells $400 Million in Bonds: It was the nation's first international debt sale in two years and included some bonds due a century from now. China, which said it had no immediate plans for the money it raised, is seeking to boost U.S. investors' interest in its debt. China attracted buyers to its first sale of Yankee bonds--or dollar-denominated bonds sold in the United States by a foreign entity--by offering juicy yields and including sought-after century bonds in the mix.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1996 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China's decision to curb foreign financial news services may be as much an attempt to claim a chunk of a fast-growing business for itself as it is an effort to curtail the flow of free information, analysts said Wednesday. The move also may be intended partly to choke off market data to unscrupulous and fly-by-night financial operations that have proliferated in the free-market economy here.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Finance Ministry to Investigate Securities Market: Officials plan a nationwide investigation of the securities industry as part of their effort to beef up supervision and reinforce financial regulations. The campaign, front-page news in Chinese newspapers last week, comes in the wake of efforts by the China's securities regulators to curb rampant speculation in futures markets. Some analysts said the investigation was a step in the right direction but that it's not likely to end speculation.
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | JIM MANN
This is the tale of a share of stock. It is the story of how much China has changed--and also how, in ways that America doesn't grasp, it really hasn't. Eight years ago, Shanghai opened the way for China's first stock trading since the Communist takeover of 1949. At the time, the securities market was extremely limited, more a couple of small offices than a centralized exchange. Yet this was, for China, almost a revolution.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1994 | From Bloomberg Business News
U.S. investors say China's fallen stock prices are encouraging them to jump into the country's equity markets. "Would I begin buying now? Yes," said Michael Holland, a partner at the Blackstone Group and a director of the publicly traded China Fund. The Credit Lyonnais index of Chinese stocks traded in Hong Kong fell 15% this year while the index of "B" shares, which are listed in China and can be traded by foreigners, has declined a sharp 37.6%.
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