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Securities Industry Employment

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BUSINESS
September 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wall Street Is Hiring Again: Wall Street firms hired nearly 6,000 new workers in the second quarter, the first substantial increase since the 1987 stock market crash sent the industry into recession. The Securities Industry Assn. said employment at New York Stock Exchange member firms rose to 214,925 at the end of June, a 2.8% increase for the year.
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BUSINESS
September 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Wall Street Is Hiring Again: Wall Street firms hired nearly 6,000 new workers in the second quarter, the first substantial increase since the 1987 stock market crash sent the industry into recession. The Securities Industry Assn. said employment at New York Stock Exchange member firms rose to 214,925 at the end of June, a 2.8% increase for the year.
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NEWS
March 26, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nine years, Scott Discount lived the classic '80s success story of the young man who finds wealth and status above the restless gorges of Wall Street. Now he's living a story that's more typical of the new decade. Discount was thrown out of work last January when his employer, First American Bank, closed the trading desk where he supervised the buying and selling of yen, marks and other currencies.
NEWS
March 26, 1990 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nine years, Scott Discount lived the classic '80s success story of the young man who finds wealth and status above the restless gorges of Wall Street. Now he's living a story that's more typical of the new decade. Discount was thrown out of work last January when his employer, First American Bank, closed the trading desk where he supervised the buying and selling of yen, marks and other currencies.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2003 | From Reuters
This year is likely to be the third-most profitable ever for Wall Street firms, but they will earn less than previously thought, the Securities Industry Assn. said Tuesday. The Wall Street trade group said pretax profit for New York Stock Exchange member firms probably would total $15 billion, more than twice the $6.9 billion earned in 2002, helped by a tight leash on costs. The association earlier this month forecast that profit would top $16.3 billion, down from its October prediction of $22.5 billion.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1998 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rocked by global financial markets' extraordinary chaos of recent months, Wall Street is taking the knife to its payrolls. The litany of recent layoff announcements by major brokerages, banks and other players has raised memories of the blood bath that followed the 1987 stock market crash--a four-year retrenchment by the securities industry that saw more than 30,000 jobs evaporate in New York alone. This time, however, the toll isn't expected to be nearly as severe. Although the rebound in U.S.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1998 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Discrimination isn't just immoral, it's economically inefficient, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan said Friday. Headlining the final session of Jesse Jackson's three-day conference on spreading Wall Street's wealth, the central bank chief said that race and gender discrimination in hiring and investment distorts the marketplace so that "in the end, costs are higher, less real output is produced and national wealth accumulation is slowed."
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Weary of city life and corporate pressure, Dan and Laurie Jones left Los Angeles four years ago and moved back to this prairie town where they had grown up and dated as high school sweethearts. Their modest plans for the future did not include becoming Sterling's leading entrepreneurs.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2001 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When business finally resumes on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange--the most famous 36,000 square feet of space in the financial world--the brokers and traders who work there will know that more than a century of history and their very way of life will be on the line. "Being inside the exchange building will be difficult," said James A. Jacobson, a leading trader and former NYSE board member. "People are going to relive harrowing experiences. But it's something we all have to do."
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