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Securities Industry India

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BUSINESS
February 13, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Path Cleared for Foreign Brokerages: The Securities and Exchange Board has approved Merrill Lynch, Oppenheimer, Bear Stearns and several other foreign brokerages to do business in India, news reports said. Others that gained market clearance include Nikko Securities, Kleinwort Benson Securities, Barclays De Zoete Wedd, Standard Chartered Securities and Peregrine Brokerage.
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BUSINESS
February 13, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Path Cleared for Foreign Brokerages: The Securities and Exchange Board has approved Merrill Lynch, Oppenheimer, Bear Stearns and several other foreign brokerages to do business in India, news reports said. Others that gained market clearance include Nikko Securities, Kleinwort Benson Securities, Barclays De Zoete Wedd, Standard Chartered Securities and Peregrine Brokerage.
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BUSINESS
September 28, 1992 | From Reuters
In the wake of India's worst financial scandal, stock exchange officials have agreed to set up a national stock market system linking the country's major exchanges. After a two-day meeting in Bombay that ended Saturday, exchange presidents said they had agreed to move toward establishment of a national trading system that could eventually link the country's 21 stock exchanges. They did not spell out a timetable because the links depend on the installation of computers and communications.
NEWS
December 5, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in India's bustling financial capital--where new stocks are advertised on billboards and buses, and the latest securities applications are sold from parked cars and street kiosks--Harshad Mehta had no equal. The brash young broker lived like a modern maharajah, with 29 cars and a 7,000-square-foot white-marble apartment overlooking the Arabian Sea. His pudgy, boyish face grinned from magazine covers and TV sets.
NEWS
December 5, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in India's bustling financial capital--where new stocks are advertised on billboards and buses, and the latest securities applications are sold from parked cars and street kiosks--Harshad Mehta had no equal. The brash young broker lived like a modern maharajah, with 29 cars and a 7,000-square-foot white-marble apartment overlooking the Arabian Sea. His pudgy, boyish face grinned from magazine covers and TV sets.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1992 | From Reuters
In the wake of India's worst financial scandal, stock exchange officials have agreed to set up a national stock market system linking the country's major exchanges. After a two-day meeting in Bombay that ended Saturday, exchange presidents said they had agreed to move toward establishment of a national trading system that could eventually link the country's 21 stock exchanges. They did not spell out a timetable because the links depend on the installation of computers and communications.
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