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BUSINESS
July 13, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sharp challenge to the globalization-minded New York Stock Exchange, San Francisco-based Montgomery Securities on Friday launched a rare effort to force the exchange to reverse its plan to open trading half an hour early. Montgomery, the largest institutional broker in the West, said the Big Board's decision to open trading at 9 a.m. Eastern time--6 a.m.
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BUSINESS
July 13, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sharp challenge to the globalization-minded New York Stock Exchange, San Francisco-based Montgomery Securities on Friday launched a rare effort to force the exchange to reverse its plan to open trading half an hour early. Montgomery, the largest institutional broker in the West, said the Big Board's decision to open trading at 9 a.m. Eastern time--6 a.m.
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BUSINESS
June 23, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, This story was compiled by Jonathan Peterson from reports by Times staff writers in Southern California and around the nation
Unlike people in most industries, executives in the securities business can pinpoint the precise moment their business drought came to an end: The explosive stock market rally that began Jan. 17 after the U.S.-led coalition launched its attack on Iraq "brought people rushing back into the market with both feet," said Thomas Quick, president of discount broker Quick & Reilly Inc.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1988 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
To many of the New York employees of Kidder, Peabody & Co., the Great Crash of 1987 really was a crash. In a broad cost-cutting effort, the firm announced in December that it would cut about 1,000 jobs, 15% of its work force. But in Kidder's Los Angeles office, the crash so far seems to be more like a little bump, if that. The firm has cut only about 1% or 2% of its staff here and is considering opening a new sales office in Woodland Hills that would offset those cuts.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2008 | Geraldine Baum, Baum is a Times staff writer.
Mona Mond had a plan -- and it didn't include Wall Street going haywire and giving up a three-bedroom house with a half-acre yard for a small apartment. She'd married a man with a career on Wall Street, and at the very least she was going to live in a house, preferably brand new, with a Jacuzzi in her bedroom and a pool in that yard. There'd be a maid -- and no skimping, no worrying that any day Amar, her husband, would lose his job.
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