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Securities Industry United States

BUSINESS
September 8, 1999 | Thomas S. Mulligan
The year 2000 will begin with "business as usual" in U.S. securities markets, a phalanx of top-ranking regulators, stock market chiefs and other officials asserted at a news conference in Washington on Tuesday. The officials, including the heads of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the New York Stock Exchange and the National Assn.
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BUSINESS
July 23, 1999 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interest rate warnings from Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan on Thursday added to an already nervous mood on Wall Street, where some investors are hunkering down for a midsummer swoon. Stocks and bonds both lost ground Thursday. And with the dollar tumbling to a five-month low against the Japanese yen--the opposite of what Japanese officials think is good for their struggling economy--Tokyo's Nikkei-225 share index fell nearly 3% to 17,730. The Dow industrials eased 33.
NEWS
July 14, 1999 | Associated Press
Online service provider Internet Initiative Japan reportedly plans to go public on the U.S. market in what would be the first case of a Japanese firm listing shares abroad before doing so at home. The company hopes to raise about $150 million in its share offering, which may come as early as August on Nasdaq, the Nihon Keizai Shimbun, Japan's leading business daily, reported Tuesday evening.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1999 | TOM PETRUNO
Here's a good reason why Wall Street isn't more afraid of what the Federal Reserve might do soon with interest rates: Corporate earnings growth is expected to be stellar in both the second and third quarters. Earnings tracker First Call is estimating that the companies in the blue-chip Standard & Poor's 500-stock index will show 15% earnings growth in the current quarter and 20% in the third quarter, on average.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1999 | From Reuters
Top Wall Street players expressed broad support Wednesday for a bill to overhaul the Depression-era banking laws even as a new rift opened up among lawmakers. Leaders of the banking, securities and insurance industries coalesced around H.R. 10, legislation resurrected from last year's Congress that would allow one-stop shopping for a host of financial services. "The outstanding issues are few and resolvable," David Komansky, chairman and chief executive of Merrill Lynch & Co.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1999 | JOSH FRIEDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sky-high stock market, which rallied again on Tuesday, is getting support from an important source: corporate earnings. At the midway point of the 1998 fourth-quarter profit reporting season, market watchers say they're pleasantly surprised by the numbers so far, though hardly giddy. "This is encouraging but not conclusive," said Marshall Acuff, equity strategist at brokerage Salomon Smith Barney in New York.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1999 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid more signs that many small investors--and corporate insiders--are bailing out, Internet stocks tumbled again Thursday, leading a broad decline on Wall Street. That left many Wall Streeters wondering whether the Internet stock bubble has burst--or if this decline, like others that have hit the sector over the last two years, will be only a temporary pullback followed by another surge. The technology-laden Nasdaq composite index endured the brunt of the sell-off, sliding 70.77 points, or 2.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1999 | PAUL J. LIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
World markets were caught off guard Wednesday by Brazil's decision to let its currency weaken, as stocks nearly everywhere finished down sharply--echoing declines that have followed other currency devaluations since mid-1997. But on Wall Street, an early plunge attracted a horde of buyers, and many stocks finished well above their lows for the day. "It was just a wild ride," said Everen Securities technical analyst Gregory Nie.
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