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BUSINESS
October 2, 2008 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
The Securities and Exchange Commission has backed away from its plan to force money managers to disclose publicly how they've "shorted" stocks. The agency late Wednesday announced changes to a series of emergency rules it put in place beginning Sept. 17 to curb short selling, which has been fingered -- some say unfairly -- as a major cause of the collapse of many bank and brokerage stocks. As expected, the SEC, under Chairman Christopher Cox, said it would extend its outright ban on shorting of nearly 1,000 financial stocks beyond the scheduled expiration today.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
New York's attorney general and securities regulators in nine other states are probing auction-rate securities and the role Wall Street firms had in enticing investors into the troubled $330-billion market. New York Atty. Gen. Andrew Cuomo's office launched an investigation this week, sending subpoenas to 18 broker-dealers and banks, people familiar with the probe said Thursday. The securities were long touted as cash-like investments, attracting both individual and institutional investors, until the credit crunch led to a breakdown in the market.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Foreigners sold a record amount of U.S. securities in August as a global credit crunch sparked an exodus from stock and bond markets, the Treasury Department said Tuesday. In a separate report, the United Nations said that last year the U.S. was once again the favorite destination for companies investing in businesses outside their home countries. The Treasury's monthly report on foreigners' transactions in domestic equities and long-term debt securities said overseas investors sold a net $34.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2007 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
Congress should revamp securities regulation, shield accounting firms from litigation and take other steps to bolster American financial competitiveness, according to a new report from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Echoing other recent studies by business and political groups, the report to be released today by a chamber-appointed commission says that U.S.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2006 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
A state judge has thrown out California's fraud lawsuit against brokerage firm Edward Jones & Co., in another defeat for Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer's attempt to assert authority over mutual fund sales practices. Superior Court Judge Loren McMaster in Sacramento dismissed Lockyer's 17-month-old suit against St. Louis-based Jones last week, ruling that California's case conflicts with a federal law that gives U.S. regulators sole authority to set securities-industry disclosure rules.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2006 | From Dow Jones/the Associated Press
Citigroup's Smith Barney brokerage unit has agreed to pay $98 million to settle claims on behalf of thousands of current and former brokers who said they were owed overtime pay and other reimbursements. The proposed settlement is the latest and largest by securities firms that claimed brokers were exempt from state and federal overtime laws because they are salaried, administrative employees.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2006 | From Reuters
A new judge has been assigned to the case of former star investment banker Frank Quattrone, but the government has yet to decide whether it plans to put him on trial for obstruction and witness tampering charges for a third time. "The only comment we have is we will be advising the judge about the status of the proceedings," Megan Gaffney, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan, said Wednesday. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan has been assigned the case, she said.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2006 | From Reuters
The New York Stock Exchange said it was in talks regarding a "strategic transaction," and a source familiar with the situation said the London Stock Exchange was one of the parties to the discussions. The source spoke on condition of anonymity, and the two exchanges declined to comment on whether they were in talks. The news came just days after rival Nasdaq Stock Market Inc. snapped up a stake in the 300-year-old London exchange after its takeover offer of $4.2 billion was rebuffed.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2006 | From Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday threw out a lifetime securities industry ban by the NASD against Frank Quattrone, four days after a federal appeals court overturned the former star investment banker's 2004 conviction on obstruction and witness tampering charges. The SEC said the NASD, the securities industry's self-regulatory arm, "did not act in accordance with its own rules" in issuing the ban in November 2004.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2006 | From Associated Press
Japanese government officials Thursday sharply criticized the Tokyo Stock Exchange for its inability to cope with a surge of stock sales triggered by an investigation of a popular Internet company's financial dealings. "A stock exchange that can't carry on trading simply doesn't deserve to exist," Economy Minister Kaoru Yosano said in a nationally televised news conference. "The exchange should make it a top priority to bring business back to normal."
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