Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSecurities Industry
IN THE NEWS

Securities Industry

BUSINESS
April 27, 2006 | From Reuters
A new judge has been assigned to the case of former star investment banker Frank Quattrone, but the government has yet to decide whether it plans to put him on trial for obstruction and witness tampering charges for a third time. "The only comment we have is we will be advising the judge about the status of the proceedings," Megan Gaffney, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan, said Wednesday. U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan has been assigned the case, she said.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 17, 2006 | From Reuters
The New York Stock Exchange said it was in talks regarding a "strategic transaction," and a source familiar with the situation said the London Stock Exchange was one of the parties to the discussions. The source spoke on condition of anonymity, and the two exchanges declined to comment on whether they were in talks. The news came just days after rival Nasdaq Stock Market Inc. snapped up a stake in the 300-year-old London exchange after its takeover offer of $4.2 billion was rebuffed.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
When Takao Uchida's plan to launch his own business fell through three years ago, he knew right away how to use his 2.5 million yen ($21,550) in savings. He bought stocks. Uchida has doubled his money since then. The 29-year-old recently quit a job as a computer engineer to become a full-time day trader and now heads a company to provide support for hundreds of others like him. "Sometimes I get so carried away, I end up skipping lunch.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2006 | From Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday threw out a lifetime securities industry ban by the NASD against Frank Quattrone, four days after a federal appeals court overturned the former star investment banker's 2004 conviction on obstruction and witness tampering charges. The SEC said the NASD, the securities industry's self-regulatory arm, "did not act in accordance with its own rules" in issuing the ban in November 2004.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2006 | From Reuters and Bloomberg News
The price of silver hit its highest level in more than 22 years Tuesday, after U.S. regulators paved the way for an exchange-traded mutual fund that would invest directly in the metal. The Securities and Exchange Commission said it approved rule changes that would allow the American Stock Exchange to list shares in Barclays' proposed iShares Silver Trust. Speculators bid up silver futures, betting that the fund could mean heavy new demand for the metal.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2006 | From Associated Press
Japanese government officials Thursday sharply criticized the Tokyo Stock Exchange for its inability to cope with a surge of stock sales triggered by an investigation of a popular Internet company's financial dealings. "A stock exchange that can't carry on trading simply doesn't deserve to exist," Economy Minister Kaoru Yosano said in a nationally televised news conference. "The exchange should make it a top priority to bring business back to normal."
BUSINESS
January 12, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Wall Street firms will pay their New York City workers a record $21.5 billion in bonuses for 2005 amid soaring profits, state Comptroller Alan Hevesi forecast Wednesday. The average bonus for the city's 174,000 investment bankers and other securities industry workers will rise 10% to $125,500, also a record, Hevesi said. Total bonuses will rise 15.5%, surpassing the previous record of $19.5 billion set in 2000.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2006 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
The flat stock market of 2005 helped bring at least one benefit to corporate America: a decline in securities class-action suits, according to a study released Tuesday. The number of such suits dropped 17% to 176 last year, the lowest total since 1997, according to an annual report by Boston-based Cornerstone Research and Stanford Law School. The highest number in recent years, 239 suits, came in 1998.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2005 | From Reuters
The brokerage industry's chief regulatory group said Tuesday it collected a record $125.4 million in disciplinary fines this year, 21% more than in 2004, for violations including abuses in sales of mutual funds and variable annuities. The Washington-based NASD also said it filed 1,412 enforcement actions in 2005, up 1% from the previous year, and barred or suspended 737 people from the securities industry, down 12%. It closed 9,150 arbitration cases and 1,700 mediation cases.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2005 | Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writer
The skippers of the $7-billion Clipper mutual fund in Beverly Hills are abandoning ship, after two years of lagging performance. Managers James Gipson, Michael Sandler and Bruce Veaco, who have run the value-oriented stock fund since the mid-1980s, are leaving at the end of the year, the fund's parent company said Friday. Gipson, 62, is the founder of Pacific Financial Research Inc., the entity that serves as advisor to the Clipper and Clipper Focus funds.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|