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Securities Offering

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BUSINESS
March 13, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Sirius XM Radio Inc. filed with regulators to offer as much as $1 billion in new securities. The so-called shelf registration with the Securities and Exchange Commission paves the way for an offering of stock or debt.
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OPINION
May 23, 2010 | Arlie Hochschild
The jobless in the United States lose far more than their paychecks; they also lose precious social support. Research has found that the health of those who lose jobs is likely to decline and the risk of dying rises. Many not only lose daily contact with factory and office friends, they also retreat from other social interaction. Compared with the employed, the jobless are less likely to vote, volunteer, see friends and talk to family. Even on weekends, the jobless spend more time alone than those with jobs That's not good.
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BUSINESS
January 5, 1987
The Securities and Exchange Commission said it agreed to postpone its 45-day suspension of Denver-based Blinder, Robinson & Co., the nation's largest "penny stock" broker, while the firm appeals the decision to the U.S. Court of Appeals. But the SEC refused to grant a postponement for the minimum two-year suspension that it imposed on the firm's president, Meyer Blinder. The firm was barred by the SEC on Dec.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Sirius XM Radio Inc. filed with regulators to offer as much as $1 billion in new securities. The so-called shelf registration with the Securities and Exchange Commission paves the way for an offering of stock or debt.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2007 | From Times Staff Reports
The Securities and Exchange Commission said Friday that it filed an emergency action to halt an ongoing $45-million securities offering that the agency alleged to be a Ponzi-like scheme by an Arcadia man. The complaint was filed against Terchi Liao (a.k.a. Nelson Liao) and two entities he controls, AOB Commerce Inc. and AOB Asia Fund I, LLC. The SEC said a federal judge issued a temporary restraining order halting the offering and appointed a temporary receiver over the AOB entities.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1985 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
Oak Industries Inc. said Friday that it wrote off an additional $80 million in the fourth quarter, wiping out its remaining equity and leaving the company with a negative net worth of about $23 million. The troubled cable-TV equipment and media company also deferred $5.25 million in debenture interest payments due Friday and said it plans to restructure $230 million in debt in an attempt to reduce its $28-million annual interest expense.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2001 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stacey and Sean Hammond invested more than $30,000 last year in shares of a Los Angeles company that promised to incubate dozens of fast-growing Internet companies. What they didn't know was that the company's founder, Craig N. Kirt, had a few years earlier been suspended from selling securities in another state. Now, the Hammonds, residents of Hayden Lake, Idaho (population 338), say they can't get answers about what happened to their investment.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2001 | Dow Jones
Irvine Sensors Corp. plans to sell up to $100 million of common stock, convertible preferred stock, debt and warrants, according to a shelf-registration statement filed Thursday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Details of the securities will be provided in a prospectus. A shelf filing lets a company register securities in advance and sell them from time to time as needed.
NEWS
August 5, 1988 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
The Social Security Administration announced Thursday that it will offer all workers personalized reports estimating their future retirement benefits and the payments they can expect if they become disabled. The new, free service will provide a clearer picture of the limitations of Social Security benefits and encourage individuals to do a better job of financial planning, Social Security Commissioner Dorcas R. Hardy told a news conference.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | Associated Press
The Social Security Administration today unveiled an easy-to-read form that will give workers of any age individual financial notices of how much they can expect to receive when they retire. The new "Personal Earnings and Benefit Estimate Statements," promised by President Reagan in his last State of the Union address, also disclose how much a worker and family would get each month in disability or survivors' benefits.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2008 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
The government plans to announce today that it will offer MasterCard debit cards to the estimated 4 million Social Security recipients who don't have bank accounts. Instead of getting a paper check, a recipient's monthly benefit would be electronically transferred, at no cost, to the debit card's balance. Using the card to make purchases would be free, as would one ATM withdrawal a month.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2007 | From Times Staff Reports
The Securities and Exchange Commission said Friday that it filed an emergency action to halt an ongoing $45-million securities offering that the agency alleged to be a Ponzi-like scheme by an Arcadia man. The complaint was filed against Terchi Liao (a.k.a. Nelson Liao) and two entities he controls, AOB Commerce Inc. and AOB Asia Fund I, LLC. The SEC said a federal judge issued a temporary restraining order halting the offering and appointed a temporary receiver over the AOB entities.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
In a sign that the corporate debt market may be stabilizing, companies are on track to sell $13.65 billion in bonds this week, including $3.76 billion sold on Tuesday--the most in one day since June 18. The offerings come after corporate bond sales slowed in July to $16.18 billion--the lowest monthly total since March 1995--amid concerns about companies' accounting and weak profit growth.
NEWS
March 17, 2002 | JOHANNA NEUMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may not have the historic import of the Boston Tea Party, but a rebellion is brewing these days that literally could change the national landscape. And federal officials are getting an earful. "Something has to be done about this," Don Miles, a Seattle architect, thought to himself as he walked by the federal courthouse recently. "We seem to have forgotten all about the fact that the word 'city' comes from the word 'civility.'
NEWS
December 12, 2001 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The solution to Social Security's financial predicament seemed to grow more distant Tuesday, with a presidential commission failing to rally around a single plan for letting workers invest some of their payroll taxes in stocks and bonds. Instead, the panel sent President Bush three options.
BUSINESS
October 23, 2001 | Reuters
Motorola Inc. said it plans to raise as much as $1.4 billion from two securities offerings, and use the proceeds to cut short-term debt and for general corporate purposes. The Schaumburg, Ill.-based company, whose debt was downgraded last week, is cutting 26% of its employees this year amid a global slump in demand for telecommunications equipment and expects to post its first full-year operating loss in at least 45 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1996 | KATE FOLMAR
Low-income adults who are elderly, disabled or living with AIDS can have their homes made safer and more accessible for free through Home Secure, a nonsectarian program of the Jewish Family Service of Los Angeles' North Hollywood office. Home Secure is a free safety and security service designed to allow people with limited incomes and disabilities to live in their own homes, according to program director Leslie Friedman.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | TIM REITERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the speed of cyberspace, repercussions from this month's terror attacks raced across the country to the Redding headquarters of Pre-employ.com and MyBackground Check.Com near Mt. Shasta. "We've had over a 100% increase in the number of business owners and landlords contacting us for information on criminal background checks since the tragedy," said company president Robert Mather.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could lead to changes in the way Americans watch television, five major Hollywood studios have agreed on an anti-piracy technology designed to protect digital movies and other forms of video entertainment from theft. The move could speed the replacement of old analog TVs and cable set-top boxes and bring VCRs with new devices that can unscramble, record and store encrypted digital programming.
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