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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2009 | By Jack Leonard
A former security guard accused of fatally shooting an 18-year-old college student in a Palmdale parking lot nearly a decade ago was convicted of murder Friday, authorities said. The verdict caps a lengthy legal saga that began when Raymond Lee Jennings first reported finding Michelle O'Keefe's body during a routine patrol of the park-and-ride lot. Investigators found the victim, a student at Antelope Valley College, slumped in the front seat of her Ford Mustang. She had been shot four times in the chest and face.
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TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Myscha Theriault
Any traveler can get distracted - in fact, it's the rare traveler who doesn't. But when your attention is focused on other things, you may be leaving yourself wide open to theft and data breaches. From stashing your cash to selecting luggage, here are some of my favorite security solutions. How to carry cash: Carrying limited currency and keeping it in multiple locations keep your theft risk manageable. The storage strategies are as varied as the types of currencies you could carry, but a few stand out as being particularly secure.
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WORLD
October 31, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
Managers of an atomic power plant in Sweden used janitors to guard the facility when the alarm system was malfunctioning, according to a critical report from the country's nuclear watchdog. In a statement on its website, the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority said managers at the Oskarshamn plant had cleaning and maintenance staff help guard parts of the plant's perimeter because some motion sensors were not working. It said the workers had no security guard training.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | Chris O'Brien and Salvador Rodriguez
The discovery of a significant flaw in software that was supposed to provide extra protection for thousands of websites has thrown the tech world into chaos as experts scrambled to understand the scope of the vulnerability. On Tuesday, Tumblr, owned by Yahoo Inc., became the largest website to disclose that it had been hit by the "Heartbleed Bug" and urged users to change not just the password for its site but for all others as well. Signaling just how much uncertainty and confusion surrounds the glitch, security experts warned that such a gesture might actually be useless because if a site has not fixed the problem hackers could just as easily steal the new password.
NATIONAL
June 15, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A lawyer for Texas state troopers says a security system intended to detect intruders at the governor's mansion wasn't working the night that an arsonist set fire to the building. The system was supposed to sound an alarm to troopers stationed in a carriage house behind the mansion if someone got over the property walls. The Department of Public Safety cut back its security at the 152-year-old mansion last year after Gov. Rick Perry and his wife moved out at the start of a $10-million renovation job. Only one trooper was on duty when the fire broke out June 8, causing extensive damage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2003 | Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writer
The San Bernardino man who allegedly shot a sheriff's deputy last week, and then stunned investigators by pulling out a handgun and killing himself in a Sheriff's Department interview room after his arrest, was facing a third-strike felony charge and a possible life sentence if convicted, authorities said Monday. San Bernardino County Sheriff Gary Penrod also said investigators found that the suspect, Ricardo Alfonso Cerna, 47, had two bullets in his .
OPINION
March 1, 2013
Re “ Glendale schools boost security ,” Feb. 25 This weekend, Glendale will host its annual gun show at the Civic Auditorium, conveniently located near a skate park, schools and opening-day Little League fields. Seems to me if officials want to take steps to make Glendale schools safer, they could start at the heart of the problem, namely by making it more difficult to get more guns and ammo. It's not a lack of security in our schools - it's the guns, this country's addiction to them and fear run amok that are threatening our communities.
OPINION
June 27, 2012
Re "Locked and loaded for the Olympics," June 25 The Olympic Games are supposed to represent countries coming together with pride and talented athletes and friendly relations with the world community, and yet London is preparing for the 2012 Games with a mass deployment of weapons worthy of wartime peril. It's amazing that for a period of two weeks, people get along with each other, compete fairly and show respect for their peers while the world rejoices at the accomplishments of these dedicated men and women.
SPORTS
March 11, 2014 | By David Wharton
After twin bombings at last year's Boston Marathon killed three people and injured 264, officials have established additional security measures for this spring's race. The changes include a law enforcement presence that will be doubled to more than 3,500 officers. "This year, runners and spectators will see more uniformed police officers on the course and as they approach the course," Kurt Schwartz, director of the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, told reporters. "And in some areas, the uniformed police officers will be accompanied by bomb-sniffing canines.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2013 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, who sits at the center of the nation's immigration debate, pushed back Wednesday against congressional demands to tighten border security further before creating a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the U.S. Testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Napolitano argued that border security had "never been stronger. " She said the Obama administration had deported a record number of people, had increased the number of border agents to a record 21,300 and cut illegal crossings to their lowest levels in 40 years.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Adam Crain assumed that tapping into the computer networks used by power companies to keep electricity zipping through transmission lines would be nearly impossible in these days of heightened vigilance over cybersecurity. When he discovered how wrong he was, his work sent Homeland Security Department officials into a scramble. Crain, the owner of a small tech firm in Raleigh, N.C., along with a research partner, found penetrating transmission systems used by dozens of utilities to be startlingly easy.
OPINION
April 6, 2014
Re "Hands off those photos," Editorial, April 3 Count me among those who have encountered security hysteria for taking pictures. In 2004, I stood in a broad, traffic-free street in a river-adjacent industrial zone of my hometown of Memphis, seeking to capture the beautiful, auburn-streaked patina of a huge, unpainted storage tank. An overzealous security guard called 911 to report a frighteningly skinny, 60-year-old white man in shorts, who might be a terrorist hell-bent on blowing up thousands of gallons of maybe cottonseed oil or rendered animal fat. Memphis police screamed onto the scene.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan, David Zahniser and Doug Smith
In January, President Obama announced a block-by-block approach to relieving poverty in Los Angeles. Federal money, he said, would pour into a newly created Promise Zone. The boundaries encompassed crowded immigrant communities around MacArthur Park and Koreatown, as well as upscale areas of Hollywood and Los Feliz. Left out was South L.A., where the poverty rate is higher. The exclusion stunned many South L.A. leaders. The strategy, presidential aides said, was to concentrate resources in communities where nonprofits or public agencies had already received one of the Obama administration's signature urban renewal grants.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: I'm the president of our homeowner association mainly because no one else wants the job. We live in a prestigious area of Los Angeles and have fewer than 30 units. Because nobody wants to be on our board we hired a management company. They're not a California company. Their head office is out of state, and we've never seen or been to their California place of business and do not know where it is or that they even have a California office. A management representative came and picked up our files and documents, including owners' personal information and accounts, and gave us their P.O. box number.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Gay rights advocates in Michigan cheered Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr.'s announcement Friday that the federal government will recognize about 300 same-sex marriages hastily performed March 22. But the small victory translates to more complications for some newlyweds. After a federal judge struck down the state's gay marriage ban March 21, Deborah Dolney, 28, and her fiancee, Jessie-Mae Secord, 33, seized the opportunity to get married. Four counties opened their offices the next day to issue marriage licenses, and Dolney and Secord were among those in line.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | By Sarah Chayes
On Feb. 20, Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan fired his respected central bank governor, who was trying to discover what had happened to an estimated $20 billion that disappeared from the nation's oil revenue over an 18-month period. Four days later, across the country in the parched northeast, members of the Boko Haram extremist group attacked a public boarding school, shooting children in their sleep and setting school buildings afire. It was the latest in a string of massacres by the group, whose statements call for an Islamic state ruled by sharia law in Nigeria.
OPINION
September 12, 2013
Re "Testing a new curriculum," Editorial, Sept. 8 National security demands that the U.S. produce the world's top scientists. Why, then, is K-12 achievement in the sciences low compared to many other advanced nations? The reason is simple. As indicated in your fine editorial on standardized testing under the new Common Core curriculum, there is no requirement in federal law for science proficiency testing. Only when there is required testing of students, as there is in English and math, will much more attention be given to science in our schools.
SPORTS
April 15, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
In response to the bombings at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, the Los Angeles Police Department said there would be an increased security presence at and around Dodger Stadium on Monday night. The Dodgers are playing host to the San Diego Padres in the first game of a three-game series. “We believe Dodger Stadium has been a safe place,” officer Sally Nadera said. “This is to reassure the people that Dodger Stadium is safe.” Before the terrorist attack in Boston, the LAPD had no plans to increase security at the ballpark, according to Nadera.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard and Walter Hamilton
Putting to rest one of its biggest remaining headaches, Bank of America Corp. has agreed to pay $9.5 billion to settle claims by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The government-sponsored mortgage finance giants had demanded compensation from the Charlotte, N.C., bank for losses on securities backed by faulty loans issued during the housing boom. The bank said the settlement, announced Wednesday, resolves all claims against BofA by the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the agency that regulates Fannie and Freddie.
TRAVEL
March 24, 2014 | By Catharine Hamm
Question: A client who was traveling for the holidays stayed at a luxury hotel in Miami. She used the hotel's VIP butler services. As she prepared to leave, the butler packed the trunk. She locked it in the presence of several other persons and did not unlock it until she arrived, by private jet, at her next location, where she discovered expensive clothing and jewelry were missing, about $35,000 worth. She began to wonder: Is this the only luxury hotel where something like this can happen to its guest?
Los Angeles Times Articles
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