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January 13, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was another of those milestones that show how much the world has changed. On Thursday, visiting Defense Secretary William J. Perry and India's home affairs minister, Shankarrao Bhaorao Chavan, signed a modest but groundbreaking security agreement between countries that, despite being democracies, have often seemed more like Cold War adversaries than friends.
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WORLD
April 27, 2014 | Christi Parsons, David Cloud
The U.S. and Philippine governments have worked out a new defense cooperation agreement that opens the way for the first large-scale return of American military forces to the island nation since their eviction in the early 1990s, according to the White House. A day before President Obama is scheduled to arrive in Manila, advisors to the president said Sunday that the two sides had completed and will sign a framework accord that will allow U.S. troops, warships and aircraft to operate from Philippine military bases and training camps on a rotating basis.
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WORLD
November 20, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali and David Zucchino
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State John F. Kerry said Wednesday that the United States and Afghanistan had reached agreement on a security partnership after international combat troops withdraw, and that the deal would be presented to a gathering of influential tribal leaders beginning Thursday. The deal, whose terms Kerry did not disclose, will be subject to approval by the tribal assembly, known as a loya jirga, as well as the Afghan parliament. The tribal gathering is an advisory body only, but Afghan President Hamid Karzai has indicated he won't sign the security agreement unless the assembly approves it. "As we sit here tonight, we have agreed on the language that would be submitted to a loya jirga, but they have to pass it," Kerry said at the State Department.
WORLD
April 5, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
MAIDAN SHAHR, Afghanistan - Afghanistan passed the first major test of the impending post-American era on Saturday with an election that featured a robust turnout, minimal violence and few glaring reports of cheating as voters began the process of selecting a successor to 13-year President Hamid Karzai. Next comes the counting of some 7 million ballots nationwide and the investigation of hundreds of claims of irregularities - from the serious to the superficial. The process is likely to take several weeks and none of the three presidential front-runners is expected to win an absolute majority, which would mean a runoff vote between the top two no earlier than the end of May. Still, voters stared down Taliban death threats and lingering memories of fraud-scarred elections, trekking through the deserted streets of Kabul and rain-swept fields in the provinces to polling places guarded by 195,000 Afghan soldiers and police.
WORLD
November 21, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - He expressed outrage, sarcasm and black humor. He cast himself as a lonely voice defending his country's pride and sovereignty against American arrogance. After a frantic week of last-minute negotiations, Afghan President Hamid Karzai delivered a tepid endorsement Thursday of a proposed 10-year security pact with the United States in a rambling speech to an Afghan tribal gathering. But he then surprised attendees - and the world - by saying Afghanistan might not sign the accord until next spring.
WORLD
September 7, 2009 | Liz Sly
Air Force Staff Sgt. Daniel Raschke realized how much things had changed for U.S. troops in Iraq when his team was politely but firmly turned away from two Baghdad police stations -- by officers he had helped train. "I wouldn't say it was tense, but it was unexpected because they had been so hospitable to us in the past," said Raschke, who used to spend most of his days training Iraqi police at stations in the once-volatile Baghdad district of Dora. He now works exclusively in rural areas.
WORLD
December 7, 2013 | By David Zucchino and David S. Cloud
KABUL, Afghanistan - Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, in Afghanistan on Saturday for a previously unannounced visit, said he had been assured by Afghanistan's defense minister that a post-2014 bilateral security agreement would be signed soon. Hagel, who landed in Afghanistan in secrecy while on a scheduled trip to the Middle East, said the defense minister, Bismullah Khan Mohammadi, told him earlier Saturday that the stalemated 10-year agreement would be signed "in a very timely manner.
WORLD
November 26, 2013 | By David S. Cloud and David Zucchino
WASHINGTON - U.S. officials seeking to close a deal by year's end on the future of American troops in Afghanistan are exploring ways to bypass the country's mercurial president, Hamid Karzai, who negotiated the agreement but now refuses to sign it. Frustrated by Karzai's abrupt declaration that he won't ink the deal before Afghan elections in April, the Obama administration has begun pushing for Foreign Minister Zarar Ahmad Osmani or another top...
WORLD
July 3, 2008 | Doug Smith and Raheem Salman, Times Staff Writers
Iraq's foreign minister said Wednesday that concessions by both sides had advanced the prospects for a new security agreement needed for U.S. forces to remain in the country beyond the end of the year. Seeking to dispel criticism that the agreement would infringe on Iraqi sovereignty, Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari said the opposition was based on "misrepresentations, confusion and politicizing."
NEWS
July 9, 1986
Syrian-backed Lebanese troops and police assumed security duties at Beirut's international airport as part of a plan brokered by Syria to end militia anarchy in West Beirut. According to security sources, police and army units, joined by elite Syrian troops deployed in the capital since last week, also extended patrols into four neighborhoods dominated by militiamen of the fundamentalist Shia Muslim militia called Hezbollah (Party of God).
WORLD
March 10, 2014 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan -- The Taliban threatened to attack next month's presidential election in Afghanistan, calling on its followers “to use all force” in targeting poll workers and political activists and to disrupt balloting. “We once again call on all of our countrymen to keep away from electoral offices, voting booths, rallies and campaigns so that, may God forbid, their lives are not put into danger,” read a statement released Monday by the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, as the Taliban likes to be called.
WORLD
February 27, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
BRUSSELS - Security in Afghanistan would decrease steadily if all U.S. troops are withdrawn this year, a senior U.S. military official warned Thursday, two days after President Obama ordered the Pentagon to begin contingency planning for such a pullout. “I can't speculate what the outcome will be,” the commander said in remarks to reporters traveling with Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. “What I can tell you is Afghan forces aren't self-sustainable at the end of 2014, and over time that obviously will have an impact in terms of the security environment.” He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss military assessments.
WORLD
February 26, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
BRUSSELS -- The U.S. and its European allies on Wednesday turned up the pressure on Afghanistan to authorize foreign troops on its territory after 2014, even as officials acknowledged that they may have to wait for President Hamid Karzai's successor to resolve the standoff. At the opening of a two-day NATO meeting, Secretary-General Anders Fogh Rasmussen warned that all alliance troops serving in Afghanistan would follow the U.S. in withdrawing at the end of the year if Kabul refuses to sign an agreement with Washington.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali and Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - Signaling his frustration with events in Afghanistan, President Obama ordered the Pentagon on Tuesday to step up plans to withdraw all U.S. troops by January if Afghan leaders don't sign a bilateral security agreement. In an unusually blunt statement, the White House said Obama had telephoned Afghan President Hamid Karzai to make it clear that he had authorized new contingency planning before a two-day meeting of NATO and allied defense ministers in Brussels this week that will focus on long-term security efforts in Afghanistan.
WORLD
January 10, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams, This post has been updated and corrected, as indicated below.
Afghan President Hamid Karzai on Friday condemned the killing of a 4-year-old boy this week during a security patrol by international forces, adding to the animosity between Kabul and Washington that may leave the war-ravaged country on its own at the end of this year to deal with a resurgent Taliban. Karzai learned of the boy's death from visiting Helmand Gov. Naeem Baloch, presidential spokesman Aimal Faizi told journalists in Kabul. The boy apparently was hit when shots were fired during an International Security Assistance Force patrol through farmland in Helmand province, an ISAF spokesman said.
WORLD
January 9, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Afghan President Hamid Karzai and his top justice officials on Thursday ordered the release of 72 imprisoned terrorism suspects for lack of evidence to prosecute them, defying U.S. objections to freeing men still considered a security risk. The prisoners at the Parwan detention facility at Bagram air base, north of Kabul, were captured by U.S. and NATO forces over the course of the 12-year-old U.S.-led war in Afghanistan against the Taliban and Al Qaeda-backed militants. But a case review by Afghan officials of 88 prisoners deemed by the United States to be too dangerous to set free found enough evidence to prosecute only 16 of them, Karzai spokesman Aimal Faizi told reporters after the president met Thursday with the Afghan attorney general and justice minister.
WORLD
October 12, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A full day of talks Saturday between Secretary of State John Kerry and Afghan President Hamid Karzai failed to yield a decisive breakthrough on a security agreement amid questions over immunity for U.S. troops. The two sides appeared to move closer, however, after lengthy discussions that lasted late into the evening. Karzai said the issue of which country has jurisdiction after 2014 over any crimes committed by remaining U.S. forces would have to be resolved by an assembly of elders known as a loya jirga and the Afghan parliament.
WORLD
November 20, 2013 | By David Zucchino
KABUL, Afghanistan - Negotiations on a post-2014 security agreement between the United States and Afghanistan remained unresolved Wednesday, less than 24 hours before Afghan President Hamid Karzai was scheduled to address a gathering of tribal leaders who were expected to vote on the proposed pact. Talks have stalled over the issue of U.S. troops entering Afghan residential areas in pursuit of insurgents or terrorists. The U.S. wants its special-operations forces to continue night raids after Western combat troops depart at the end of 2014, but Karzai has insisted for months that only Afghan troops carry out such missions.
WORLD
December 20, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Two thirds of Americans questioned in a recent poll said the 12-year war fought in Afghanistan to cleanse the country of terrorists hasn't been worth the price paid in lives and dollars. Nevertheless, a majority still favors keeping some U.S. forces in the troubled country even after the military mission ends a year from now, the ABC News/Washington Post poll found. The survey conducted for the media by Langer Research Associates of New York found that disillusionment with the U.S.-led war was expressed by a majority of all political leanings.
WORLD
December 19, 2013 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - President Obama is prepared to extend a Dec. 31 deadline in a concession to Afghan President Hamid Karzai aimed at getting him to approve a security agreement that would permit U.S. forces to stay in Afghanistan past 2014, aides say. The White House has warned for months that all U.S. forces will be withdrawn unless a deal is reached, and top advisors to Obama are increasingly comfortable with that prospect. At least two senior officials say the so-called zero option is strategically viable and politically acceptable, although it still isn't the preferred outcome.
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