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NATIONAL
September 19, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - When Aaron Alexis received an access card to enter the Washington Navy Yard, the Pentagon relied on a 5-year-old background investigation completed before most of his brushes with police and signs of mental illness, a senior Defense Department official said Wednesday. But the 2008 investigation was considered recent enough under federal rules for Alexis to be granted permission to enter the Navy Yard, where he worked, merely by flashing his card to a guard at the gate.
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NATIONAL
December 20, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON -- Investigators reviewing allegations of misbehavior by Secret Service agents tasked with safeguarding the president and other top administration officials found no evidence that “misconduct is widespread” or that the agency's leadership “tolerates inappropriate behavior.” However, the investigation by the Department of Homeland Security's inspector general, launched after several agents were caught in 2012 with Colombian prostitutes,...
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NEWS
July 4, 1987 | Associated Press
The Air Force has told whistle-blower A. Ernest Fitzgerald that he will lose his security clearance and right to work with a congressional oversight panel if he does not sign a new secrecy agreement within 30 days. That could end the whistle-blowing activities of Fitzgerald, 60, who rose to national prominence in 1969, when he disclosed cost overruns in the C-5A cargo plane and was fired. He was reinstated under a court order in 1982.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2013 | By Becca Clemons
WASHINGTON - Washington Navy Yard shooter Aaron Alexis obtained a secret-level security clearance after a federal personnel report failed to mention that a 2004 arrest involved a firearm, the Navy said Monday. A senior Navy official told reporters the service learned of the incident's violent nature only after Alexis had shot 12 people to death at the Washington Navy Yard last week and was himself fatally shot by police. The Office of Personnel Management knew of Alexis' Seattle arrest because of a fingerprint check when he joined the Navy Reserve in 2007 and interviewed him about it, the official said.
NEWS
February 5, 2000 | The Washington Post
Former CIA Director John M. Deutch still has a Pentagon security clearance that allows him to work on classified defense contracts, despite having violated security rules by keeping government secrets on home computers connected to the Internet. The clearance permits Deutch to serve as a paid consultant on Defense Department contracts with Raytheon Corp., SAIC Corp. and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Deutch is a professor at MIT. George J.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The State Department has suspended the security clearance of U.S. Ambassador to Israel Martin Indyk until it completes an inquiry into "suspected violations" of security standards, the State Department confirmed. The move bars Indyk from handling classified materials. There was no indication of espionage, and investigators were focusing on "the sloppy handling of classified information" before Indyk became ambassador, the department said.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court said Wednesday that there is evidence that the CIA routinely denies security clearances to homosexuals and refused to foreclose a legal challenge to the agency's practice of considering such applicants on a case-by-case basis. In one of a series of recent rulings restricting government discrimination against homosexuals, the U.S.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2005 | Peter Wallsten and Tom Hamburger, Times Staff Writers
An intelligence analyst temporarily lost his top-secret security clearance because he faxed his resume using a commercial machine. An employee of the Defense Department had her clearance suspended for months because a jilted boyfriend called to say she might not be reliable. An Army officer who spoke publicly about intelligence failures before the Sept. 11 attacks had his clearance revoked over questions about $67 in personal charges to a military cellphone.
BUSINESS
November 15, 2004 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
At 63, Keith Milbrandt is pulling down more per hour than he has in four decades as an aerospace engineer, and he's retired. That doesn't matter to Raytheon Corp., where Milbrandt is in the midst of a four-month contract, developing an airborne radar program for the Navy. He has another part-time job with Boeing Co. designing an Air Force satellite system. He's never been so popular.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2010 | By Jessica Guynn and David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Even as Google Inc. downplayed problems with its contract with the city of Los Angeles, it kicked up its competition with Microsoft Corp. another notch in the lucrative market of selling e-mail and other software by introducing a new version of its applications aimed at government. Google announced the advance Monday after winning a key security clearance to sell software to the federal government. Although the clearance does not encompass classified data, Google is banking that the federal government's seal of approval will give customers at other levels of government more confidence that its online software is a safe and reliable way to store sensitive information, 90% of which is not classified.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - When Aaron Alexis received an access card to enter the Washington Navy Yard, the Pentagon relied on a 5-year-old background investigation completed before most of his brushes with police and signs of mental illness, a senior Defense Department official said Wednesday. But the 2008 investigation was considered recent enough under federal rules for Alexis to be granted permission to enter the Navy Yard, where he worked, merely by flashing his card to a guard at the gate.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2013 | Richard A. Serrano, David S. Cloud and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Six weeks ago, Aaron Alexis told people someone had threatened him at an airport in Virginia. A few days later, in Rhode Island, he heard voices. He thought people were speaking to him through "the walls, floor and ceiling" of the Navy base there, where he was working. In his hotel room, the voices used "some sort of microwave machine" to send vibrations through the ceiling and into his body, a police report shows him saying. He could not sleep. Alexis frequently moved as part of his contract work at military installations from New England to North Carolina; he arrived in Washington on Aug. 25. He switched hotels several times until Sept.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2013 | By Richard Serrano and David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - Aaron Alexis, the gunman who killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard on Monday before being fatally shot by law enforcement officials, had a Navy record that included several unauthorized absences from duty, instances of insubordination and disorderly conduct, one instance of being absent without leave, and several failed inspections, according to a Navy official. The official, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss the current investigation, also said that in addition to his two previously known arrests in 2004 and 2010, Alexis had been arrested in DeKalb County, Ga., in 2008 on a disorderly conduct charge and held for two nights.
NATIONAL
August 13, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano
FT. MEADE, Md. - He was late for meetings, and once curled in a fetal position on a storage room floor and clutched his head, a knife at his feet. He carved the words "I want" into a chair. Another time, he pounded his fists and flipped over a table of computers before he was wrestled into submission. And in April 2010, Army Pfc. Bradley Manning emailed his sergeant a mug shot of himself wearing makeup, dark lipstick and a flowing blond wig. "This is my problem," he wrote in the email.
WORLD
July 17, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell
BEIRUT -- The United Nations has called on nations not to turn back Syrian civil war refugees, whose swelling ranks now constitute the world's fastest-growing refugee flow in almost 20 years. “I reiterate my call to all states in the region and further afield to keep their borders open and receive all Syrians who seek protection,” U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Antonio Guterres told the Security Council in New York on Tuesday via video link from Geneva. In recent weeks, several of Syria's neighbors, along with Egypt, have made it more difficult for Syrians to enter their countries.
OPINION
June 11, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Over the weekend, as Americans were still absorbing double-barreled revelations about the extent of the National Security Agency's electronic surveillance, the source of that information outed himself. Edward J. Snowden, a 29-year-old former employee of a government contracting firm, acknowledged with no apparent regrets that he was responsible for providing journalists at the Guardian and the Washington Post with evidence of what he called an "architecture of oppression. " Snowden's emergence from the shadows puts him at risk of prosecution by the U.S. government.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2013 | Richard A. Serrano, David S. Cloud and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Six weeks ago, Aaron Alexis told people someone had threatened him at an airport in Virginia. A few days later, in Rhode Island, he heard voices. He thought people were speaking to him through "the walls, floor and ceiling" of the Navy base there, where he was working. In his hotel room, the voices used "some sort of microwave machine" to send vibrations through the ceiling and into his body, a police report shows him saying. He could not sleep. Alexis frequently moved as part of his contract work at military installations from New England to North Carolina; he arrived in Washington on Aug. 25. He switched hotels several times until Sept.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2003 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Over the years, Conquest Inc. has generated about as much revenue annually as Boeing Co. does in a few hours. So why would the Chicago aerospace giant, with about 170,000 employees, be interested in buying an obscure firm with a staff of 200? The answer: Conquest gave Boeing something that is a precious commodity in the defense industry these days -- workers with top security clearances.
TRAVEL
December 16, 2012 | By Catharine Hamm, Anne Harnagel and Christopher Reynolds, Los Angeles Times
Your face says it all: You are starting to panic. Don't. If you're shopping for a traveler, you might just find the answer to your gift-giving conundrum in these pages. Our team of travelers has tested items large and small, pricey and affordable, and we want to share them with you so you can share them with others. This is by no means comprehensive, but it can start the old synapses firing. If you can't get said item in time for the big day, cut out the picture, tie it up with a bow and use it as an IOU. The true traveler will always have a use for it because there's always that next trip.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2012 | By Hugo Martín and Ian Duncan, Los Angeles Times
A program that lets preapproved air travelers zip through faster security lines will be expanded this year to 35 of the nation's largest airports, Transportation Security Administration officials announced Wednesday. The pilot program, dubbed PreCheck, lets travelers who get TSA clearance avoid what have become the most annoying steps of post-9/11 screening: removing shoes, belt and coats. PreCheck has been tested for several months with frequent travelers who fly with several major airlines at seven airports, including Los Angeles International.
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