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NEWS
August 11, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last week's terrorist attacks on two U.S. embassies in Africa that seemed unlikely targets have prompted U.S. companies operating overseas to reassess their security precautions in cities not usually associated with terrorism, security experts said Monday. Fears of corporate vulnerability caused the phones to ring off the hooks Monday at international security consulting firms such as Kroll-O'Gara in New York and Wackenhut in Palm Beach, Fla.
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SPORTS
April 9, 2013 | By Jim Peltz
The black NASCAR truck with a white "54" on the side gleamed on pit road as its driver walked up for the night's race, prompting three dozen photographers and well-wishers to edge closer. The attraction was 19-year-old Darrell Wallace Jr. As Wallace posed for the cameras at Daytona International Speedway, the public address announcer called out his name and added: "That's a driver many people are waiting to see. " Indeed they are - especially the executives who run NASCAR - because Wallace is an African American.
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BUSINESS
January 18, 1994 | DAVID DISHNEAU, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lewis Hubble thought he had found a friend but says he was deceived--the guy was a spy. So Hubble and 42 other Kmart Corp. warehouse workers have challenged the big retailer with a privacy lawsuit that argues the right to snoop on employees ends at the employer's gate. The case has aroused debate among security experts, libertarians and business ethicists. It poses a question as old as labor history: How deeply into your life can your boss dig in the interest of protecting the store?
SPORTS
April 23, 2010 | By Eric Sondheimer, Los Angeles Times
One by one, athletes from the Los Angeles Unified School District stepped to the microphone Thursday and offered thanks to the community organizations and corporate sponsors that pledged $1.4 million to help the City Section sports program avoid cutbacks that would have folded teams and forced out coaches next school year. "What we found out is L.A. cares," said Barbara Fiege, the district's director of athletics. Watching and listening from the back of the gym at the Miguel Contreras Learning Center was the person who will have a profound effect on whether there will be enough funding in future years.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal regulators used their emergency powers Friday for the first time in an effort to ensure smooth trading during the expected reopening of U.S. stock markets Monday after a four-day shutdown. "These markets are the world's strongest and most vibrant, in spite of the heinous acts of last Tuesday," the Securities and Exchange Commission said in a brief announcement. "Investors should be assured that U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1998 | SANFORD M. JACOBY, Sanford M. Jacoby is professor of management, history and public policy at UCLA and author of "Modern Manors: Welfare Capitalism Since the New Deal" (Princeton, 1997)
Despite low unemployment rates, Americans remain anxious about job security. The latest figures show that mass layoffs are at the same level as in the 1993 recession, while the share of employees who say they are frequently concerned about layoffs has risen from 20% in 1990 to 43% this year. Accompanying the rise is continuing unease about the availability of "good" jobs: career-type positions that offer decent wages and benefits.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2006 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
Amid a deepening federal investigation into companies' past stock-option practices, a group of prominent economists and finance experts has stepped in with a surprising proposition: It wants to repeal an option-reform measure adopted last year. The rule at issue requires companies to deduct from their earnings the value of options granted to employees.
SPORTS
April 23, 2010 | By Eric Sondheimer, Los Angeles Times
One by one, athletes from the Los Angeles Unified School District stepped to the microphone Thursday and offered thanks to the community organizations and corporate sponsors that pledged $1.4 million to help the City Section sports program avoid cutbacks that would have folded teams and forced out coaches next school year. "What we found out is L.A. cares," said Barbara Fiege, the district's director of athletics. Watching and listening from the back of the gym at the Miguel Contreras Learning Center was the person who will have a profound effect on whether there will be enough funding in future years.
SPORTS
April 9, 2013 | By Jim Peltz
The black NASCAR truck with a white "54" on the side gleamed on pit road as its driver walked up for the night's race, prompting three dozen photographers and well-wishers to edge closer. The attraction was 19-year-old Darrell Wallace Jr. As Wallace posed for the cameras at Daytona International Speedway, the public address announcer called out his name and added: "That's a driver many people are waiting to see. " Indeed they are - especially the executives who run NASCAR - because Wallace is an African American.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1999 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First Alliance Corp. said Thursday it paid $4 million for an Orange-based mortgage banking company that is owned by the sons of its chairman and was recently the target of two state investigations into questionable lending practices. Irvine-based First Alliance said the acquisition of Coast Security Mortgage Corp.--which is chiefly owned by Mark and Brad Chisick--will boost the company's loan volume by about $100 million a year.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2006 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
Amid a deepening federal investigation into companies' past stock-option practices, a group of prominent economists and finance experts has stepped in with a surprising proposition: It wants to repeal an option-reform measure adopted last year. The rule at issue requires companies to deduct from their earnings the value of options granted to employees.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal regulators used their emergency powers Friday for the first time in an effort to ensure smooth trading during the expected reopening of U.S. stock markets Monday after a four-day shutdown. "These markets are the world's strongest and most vibrant, in spite of the heinous acts of last Tuesday," the Securities and Exchange Commission said in a brief announcement. "Investors should be assured that U.S.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1999 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First Alliance Corp. said Thursday it paid $4 million for an Orange-based mortgage banking company that is owned by the sons of its chairman and was recently the target of two state investigations into questionable lending practices. Irvine-based First Alliance said the acquisition of Coast Security Mortgage Corp.--which is chiefly owned by Mark and Brad Chisick--will boost the company's loan volume by about $100 million a year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1998 | SANFORD M. JACOBY, Sanford M. Jacoby is professor of management, history and public policy at UCLA and author of "Modern Manors: Welfare Capitalism Since the New Deal" (Princeton, 1997)
Despite low unemployment rates, Americans remain anxious about job security. The latest figures show that mass layoffs are at the same level as in the 1993 recession, while the share of employees who say they are frequently concerned about layoffs has risen from 20% in 1990 to 43% this year. Accompanying the rise is continuing unease about the availability of "good" jobs: career-type positions that offer decent wages and benefits.
NEWS
August 11, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last week's terrorist attacks on two U.S. embassies in Africa that seemed unlikely targets have prompted U.S. companies operating overseas to reassess their security precautions in cities not usually associated with terrorism, security experts said Monday. Fears of corporate vulnerability caused the phones to ring off the hooks Monday at international security consulting firms such as Kroll-O'Gara in New York and Wackenhut in Palm Beach, Fla.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1994 | DAVID DISHNEAU, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lewis Hubble thought he had found a friend but says he was deceived--the guy was a spy. So Hubble and 42 other Kmart Corp. warehouse workers have challenged the big retailer with a privacy lawsuit that argues the right to snoop on employees ends at the employer's gate. The case has aroused debate among security experts, libertarians and business ethicists. It poses a question as old as labor history: How deeply into your life can your boss dig in the interest of protecting the store?
BUSINESS
February 10, 2004 | From Reuters
Network gear maker Juniper Networks Inc. said Monday that it would acquire network security company NetScreen Technologies Inc. for about $3.4 billion in stock in a bid to diversify away from the telephone companies that make up its customer base. The move combines Juniper's focus on telecommunications service providers such as Verizon Communications Inc. and Deutsche Telekom with NetScreen's specialty in network security for corporations, such as Merrill Lynch & Co. Sunnyvale, Calif.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The disgruntled former employee accused of the shotgun slaying of two executives at Elgar Corp. in Miramar on June 4 provided a grim reminder to local executives that the hiring and firing of employees remains an inexact science. Officials allege that Larry T. Hansel, 41, a former technician at Elgar, took control of the electronics company, and, after setting firebombs as a diversion, shot two executives.
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