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Security Deposit

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1999
* What is a security deposit? A security deposit is any payment, fee, deposit or charge, other than the first month's rent that you pay when you move in. Deposits such as cleaning fees, key deposits, pet deposits and last month's rent are all security deposits. * How much security deposit can a landlord charge? The security deposit cannot be more than two months' rent for an unfurnished rental unit, or three months' rent if furnished. * What can the security deposit be used for?
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REAL ESTATE
July 8, 2001 | KEVIN POSTEMA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: Our landlord in Los Angeles recently gave us a rent increase. He also is asking for more deposit money on top of the rent increase. Is this right? Please let me know if I may dispute the security deposit increase. Answer: Security deposit maximum amounts are limited by law to two times the monthly rent for unfurnished apartments and three times for furnished.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2012 | By Lew Sichelman
Three days after listing a house for sale, real estate agents Richard and Jean Murphy of Portland, Maine, began receiving a surprising number of calls — not from buyers but from would-be tenants. It turns out the callers were answering an ad that said the place was for rent, "and at a really low price," the agents for Harborview Properties recall. Worse, the "owner" was not the Murphys' client. It was someone living in another state who told callers that if they sent $1,500, the place would be theirs.
REAL ESTATE
July 1, 2001 | ROBERT GRISWOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: My last landlord withheld $250 of a $1,000 deposit for carpet cleaning and replacement of irrigation sprinkler heads. I believe this is normal maintenance. We vacuumed and cleaned the house well and thought that things such as carpet shampooing were the responsibility of the landlord. As for the irrigation sprinkler heads, they were all working when we left; however, the house was vacant for a while before the landlord re-rented it. Do we have recourse or are we being picky?
REAL ESTATE
March 6, 1994 | Special to the Times; This column is prepared by Project Sentinel, a rental housing mediation service in Sunnyvale, Calif
QUESTION: About eight months ago, we assumed tenancy of a house. This summer our landlord instructed us not to pick the fruit, that it belongs to his family and that they would be over to harvest it when it was ripe. We are responsible for maintaining and watering the yard, are we not entitled to the fruit on the trees? ANSWER: Residential rentals usually provide for exclusive use of the property by the tenants.
REAL ESTATE
February 8, 1998 | From Project Sentinel
QUESTION: Since I started renting out my condo, I explained to all my tenants that for their protection, I change the locks at the end of each tenancy and deduct a modest amount from their security to pay for the new locks. I even included a paragraph in my rental agreement, signed by me and my tenants, explaining that tenants are responsible for the cost of re-keying the unit.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1999 | KAREN E. KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: I started a small retail business last year and had to deposit two months' rent with my landlord. Recently, I inquired as to when I would get the money back and how much interest was earned in 1998. He advised me there was no interest. Do I have any recourse? If the landlord goes bankrupt, what happens to my deposit?
NEWS
September 6, 2003 | Kathryn Morea, Kathryn Morea lives in Santa Monica.
I run a small business in Southern California, and that business is being a landlord. I can think of few other businesses in which the law so heavily favors the customer (tenant) and so punishes the proprietor (landlord). There are many remedies available for tenants who feel mistreated. Yet what can a landlord do when she is mistreated by a tenant? Let me share a few stories with you.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1987
The language of the S. J. Diamond column on leases ("Tenants Should Know a Lease Isn't the Law," June 22) creates the impression that a landlord is not allowed to charge any fee for cleaning the apartment of an outgoing tenant. Certainly, an apartment owner may not charge a renter for damages that preceded his or her tenancy; however, the story implies that an owner may not charge a present renter for damage and cleaning related to his tenancy. The law and the courts do indeed allow owners to use the security deposit to clean apartments upon the termination of tenancies.
REAL ESTATE
September 19, 1999 | ROBERT GRISWOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: My tenant recently moved out at the end of the lease. I made a quick walk-through of the rental unit and things seemed to be fine so I immediately returned the entire security deposit. A week later when I went through the unit more carefully, I found there were several costly items (oven, garbage disposal and dishwasher) that were broken by the tenant's negligence. Can I recover the cost of repairing these items? If so, how?
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