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Security Deposit

BUSINESS
March 25, 2012 | By Lew Sichelman
Three days after listing a house for sale, real estate agents Richard and Jean Murphy of Portland, Maine, began receiving a surprising number of calls — not from buyers but from would-be tenants. It turns out the callers were answering an ad that said the place was for rent, "and at a really low price," the agents for Harborview Properties recall. Worse, the "owner" was not the Murphys' client. It was someone living in another state who told callers that if they sent $1,500, the place would be theirs.
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REAL ESTATE
July 2, 1995 | From Operation Sentinel
QUESTION: My new rental agreement has a clause that worries me. It states that if I do not pay rent on the due date, the property owner can change the locks and remove my property without notice. Is this legal? ANSWER: Under Section 789.3 of the California Civil Code it is illegal for a landlord to lock out a tenant by changing the locks, shutting off the utilities or any other method.
REAL ESTATE
May 2, 1993 | KEVIN POSTEMA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Postema is the editor of Apartment Age magazine, a publication of the Apartment Assn. of Greater Los Angeles, an apartment owners' service group
QUESTION: When I moved into my Long Beach apartment about a year ago, the rental agreement said that there were absolutely no pets allowed. I even asked if I could pay more security deposit and possibly have a pet. I was told that I could not. At the same time, the woman who lived upstairs from me had a dog. Granted it was a very old and sick dog that I never heard bark and was probably incapable of doing any damage. But, my feeling is that a dog is a dog.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1987
The language of the S. J. Diamond column on leases ("Tenants Should Know a Lease Isn't the Law," June 22) creates the impression that a landlord is not allowed to charge any fee for cleaning the apartment of an outgoing tenant. Certainly, an apartment owner may not charge a renter for damages that preceded his or her tenancy; however, the story implies that an owner may not charge a present renter for damage and cleaning related to his tenancy. The law and the courts do indeed allow owners to use the security deposit to clean apartments upon the termination of tenancies.
REAL ESTATE
September 19, 1999 | ROBERT GRISWOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: My tenant recently moved out at the end of the lease. I made a quick walk-through of the rental unit and things seemed to be fine so I immediately returned the entire security deposit. A week later when I went through the unit more carefully, I found there were several costly items (oven, garbage disposal and dishwasher) that were broken by the tenant's negligence. Can I recover the cost of repairing these items? If so, how?
REAL ESTATE
January 16, 2000 | ROBERT GRISWOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: At the end of last month I moved from my apartment, after nearly six years. During my move-out inspection with the managers, they indicated that I would receive $750 of my $800 security deposit. How long does the manager-owner have to return my security deposit and am I due any interest? Property manager Griswold replies: There is no statewide legal requirement in California for landlords to pay interest on your security deposit.
OPINION
April 11, 2002
"Renters Serve Notice to Landlords" (April 5) indicates that AB 2330 would allow "tenants who are charged two months' rent as a security deposit to pay in installments" and that "tenants who have lost their jobs would be able to use part of their security deposit as an emergency rent payment." What part of "security deposit" does Assemblywoman Carole Migden (D-San Francisco) not understand? Once a tenant has moved in, the prepaid security deposit is the major measure of insurance the owner has that the tenants will abide by their agreement.
REAL ESTATE
January 21, 2001
In "State Law Specifies Expenses Covered by Security Deposit" by Kevin Postema (Dec. 31), the question asked was: Can a deduction be taken for repainting after a 2 1/2 year tenancy? The answer suggested that half the cost could be deducted. The California Department of Consumer Affairs publication "California Tenants: A Guide to Residential Tenants' and Landlords' Rights and Responsibilities" states that a deduction is permitted only when repainting is necessary. The publication also states that there should be no deduction when the length of stay is two or more years.
REAL ESTATE
July 1, 2001 | ROBERT GRISWOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Question: My last landlord withheld $250 of a $1,000 deposit for carpet cleaning and replacement of irrigation sprinkler heads. I believe this is normal maintenance. We vacuumed and cleaned the house well and thought that things such as carpet shampooing were the responsibility of the landlord. As for the irrigation sprinkler heads, they were all working when we left; however, the house was vacant for a while before the landlord re-rented it. Do we have recourse or are we being picky?
REAL ESTATE
October 22, 2006 | Kevin Postema, Special to The Times
Question: When I moved into my apartment a year ago, I paid the first month's rent and a security deposit equal to two months' rent. Now that I have lived in my apartment for one year, how much of my deposit does the landlord have to return to me? Answer: Under California law, the landlord does not have to return any of it until you move out. The fact that you have lived in the apartment for one year has nothing to do with it.
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