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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna, Kate Mather and James Rainey
The dark of night still draped Mineta San Jose International Airport when a 15-year-old boy from nearby Santa Clara wandered onto a secure airport ramp and toward a Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767. Then he disappeared. The slight teenager, first seen on a security camera video, would not appear again until later Sunday morning, when airline workers spotted him 2,350 miles to the west, walking on the tarmac at Kahului Airport on the island of Maui. In the interim, authorities say, the boy survived a perilous, 5 1/2 -hour odyssey - enduring frigid temperatures, oxygen deprivation and a compartment unfit for human habitation - as he traveled over the Pacific Ocean in the jet's wheel well.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Brian Bennett, Kate Mather and Joseph Serna
Security experts say it's important to thoroughly trace what transpired over the approximately six-hour period that a 15-year-old apparently went undetected at Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport  before stowing away in the wheel well of a Hawaiian Airlines jetliner traveling to Maui. According to a federal law enforcement source who spoke to The Times on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to comment on the case, a security camera at the airport recorded video of a person coming over a perimeter fence at the airport just after 1 a.m. Sunday.
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BUSINESS
March 20, 1997 | (Amy Harmon)
A group of prominent cryptographers will announce today that they have discovered a hole in the privacy protection in next-generation digital cellular telephones. The new phones were supposed to be far more secure from eavesdropping and fraud than the analog phones used by most mobile-phone customers today.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The 1,000 most popular websites in the world are now safe from the Heartbleed vulnerability, but 2% of the top 1 million websites remain unsecure, a security firm recently said. Cyber security firm Sucuri Inc. said it scanned the top websites as ranked by Alexa Internet, a company that collects Web traffic data, to test how many of them remain vulnerable to Heartbleed, a bug that was recently discovered. Heartbleed is a hole in OpenSSL, a security software used by most websites, that gives hackers an entryway to steal sensitive user data, including passwords.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Bush Administration seeks to improve the federal government's none-too-stellar record on safeguarding the environment, it is running into an unexpected stumbling block in one area: its efforts to force the federal bureaucracy to recycle the 50,000 tons of memos, reports, plans and directives that it spews out every year. The security-minded are resisting it.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
As the government begins deploying whole-body imaging machines to replace metal detectors at airports nationwide, some security experts worry that the new technology could make it easier, not harder, to sneak weapons and explosives onto airplanes. In the wake of the attempted Christmas Day airline bombing, the Transportation Security Administration decided to double its investment in the new machines, with a goal of installing 450 across the country by the end of the year and 1,800 by 2014.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum and Kate Mather
When Congress formed the Transportation Security Administration two months after 9/11, the agency's mission was clear: Its officers would not carry guns or make arrests. Instead, they would focus on screening passengers for weapons, bombs and other dangerous materials. But the shooting death of a TSA officer at Los Angeles International Airport - the first fatality in the agency's history - could change that. On Monday, the union representing 45,000 federal security agents called for the creation of a class of armed TSA officers with law enforcement training and the authority to arrest people.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Chris O'Brien
WASHINGTON - The White House has released guidelines aimed at prodding companies that run some of the nation's most essential services such as utilities, cellphone towers and banks to better protect themselves from cyberattacks. Officials said the guidelines, developed under an executive order that President Obama signed a year ago, provide companies overseeing the nation's crucial infrastructure with a blueprint for identifying potential threats, protecting themselves from cyberattacks and, if an attack occurs, recovering from it. But the voluntary nature of the guidelines showed how sharply proponents of strong regulation have scaled back their ambitions - and even their language - in the face of industry opposition to government intervention.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
At least 2 million people received the email May 16 notifying them that an order they had just made on "Wallmart's" website was being processed, though none of them had done any such thing. Still, thousands of people clicked on the link in the email, taking many of them to a harmless Google search results page for "Walmart. " Others weren't so fortunate. The link led to the invisible download of malware that covertly infected their personal computers, turning them into remotely controlled robots for hackers, according to email security firm Proofpoint Inc. These sorts of "phishing" attacks are not only becoming more common but also are getting more lethal, with fake emails becoming harder to distinguish from real ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Joseph Serna, Kate Mather and James Rainey
The dark of night still draped Mineta San Jose International Airport when a 15-year-old boy from nearby Santa Clara wandered onto a secure airport ramp and toward a Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767. Then he disappeared. The slight teenager, first seen on a security camera video, would not appear again until later Sunday morning, when airline workers spotted him 2,350 miles to the west, walking on the tarmac at Kahului Airport on the island of Maui. In the interim, authorities say, the boy survived a perilous, 5 1/2 -hour odyssey - enduring frigid temperatures, oxygen deprivation and a compartment unfit for human habitation - as he traveled over the Pacific Ocean in the jet's wheel well.
WORLD
April 14, 2014 | By Alexandra Zavis
An early morning explosion that ripped through a bus station on the outskirts of the Nigerian capital, Abuja, killed at least 71 people and injured 124, police said. There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the blast, which happened during the morning rush hour. But suspicion was focused on Boko Haram , an Islamist militant group active in the northeast of the country that has been threatening to attack the capital. The explosion at the Nyanya transit park destroyed 16 high-capacity buses and 24 minibuses, many of which were loaded with passengers, police said.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | Chris O'Brien and Salvador Rodriguez
The discovery of a significant flaw in software that was supposed to provide extra protection for thousands of websites has thrown the tech world into chaos as experts scrambled to understand the scope of the vulnerability. On Tuesday, Tumblr, owned by Yahoo Inc., became the largest website to disclose that it had been hit by the "Heartbleed Bug" and urged users to change not just the password for its site but for all others as well. Signaling just how much uncertainty and confusion surrounds the glitch, security experts warned that such a gesture might actually be useless because if a site has not fixed the problem hackers could just as easily steal the new password.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
As word spread this week about the dreaded "Heartbleed" bug, consumers and Websites struggled to understand the implications and sort through some of the more apocalyptic pronouncements being made about the problem.  Consumers started to receive a trickle of notices from services they use online alerting them to potential issues and recommended steps, such as changing passwords. But given the scope of the issue, security experts projected that it could take years to sew up all the holes created by the Heartbleed bug. "This is one of the worst security issues we've seen in the last decade and will remain within the top 5 for many years to come," said Adam Ely, founder and chief operating officer of Bluebox Security.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Amro Hassan and Kate Linthicum
CAIRO - A bomb blast ripped through a bus packed with tourists Sunday, killing at least four people near Egypt's border with Israel, security officials said, in an attack that threatened to damage the tourist economies of both countries. Three South Korean tourists and the Egyptian bus driver were killed, according to a statement from Egypt's Interior Ministry. No one has claimed responsibility, but several Israeli security experts said the location of the attack suggests it was directed at least in part at Israel.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | Chris O'Brien and Tiffany Hsu
Consumers shellshocked by the escalating size and frequency of payment card hacks like the one that recently struck Target aren't likely to get much relief any time soon. If anything, security experts say, the situation will worsen for American shoppers before it improves, if it ever does. The U.S. relies largely on payment cards with magnetic strips -- described by one retail trade group as "antiquated" and especially prone to fraud -- instead of more secure systems already in place in most other countries.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Has your computer been acting a little funny lately? If so, maybe you've loaded it down with too many photos or music files, or it needs a new battery or hard drive. Another possibility: Your PC has been hijacked by a shadowy cybercrime syndicate. If so, you're not alone. In recent years, hundreds of millions of desktop and laptop PCs have been taken over by hackers — generally without the owner's knowledge — and pressed into round-the-clock digital slavery, sending spam, fishing for credit card numbers, spying on Internet traffic or logging users' keystrokes.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Capitol Police Chief Terrance W. Gainer is meeting with security experts to determine whether evacuating 35,000 people from Capitol buildings when a small plane violates Washington's restricted airspace is the safest policy amid criticism from experts that it might create even more danger.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Chris O'Brien
WASHINGTON - The White House has released guidelines aimed at prodding companies that run some of the nation's most essential services such as utilities, cellphone towers and banks to better protect themselves from cyberattacks. Officials said the guidelines, developed under an executive order that President Obama signed a year ago, provide companies overseeing the nation's crucial infrastructure with a blueprint for identifying potential threats, protecting themselves from cyberattacks and, if an attack occurs, recovering from it. But the voluntary nature of the guidelines showed how sharply proponents of strong regulation have scaled back their ambitions - and even their language - in the face of industry opposition to government intervention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum and Kate Mather
When Congress formed the Transportation Security Administration two months after 9/11, the agency's mission was clear: Its officers would not carry guns or make arrests. Instead, they would focus on screening passengers for weapons, bombs and other dangerous materials. But the shooting death of a TSA officer at Los Angeles International Airport - the first fatality in the agency's history - could change that. On Monday, the union representing 45,000 federal security agents called for the creation of a class of armed TSA officers with law enforcement training and the authority to arrest people.
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