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BUSINESS
March 20, 1997 | (Amy Harmon)
A group of prominent cryptographers will announce today that they have discovered a hole in the privacy protection in next-generation digital cellular telephones. The new phones were supposed to be far more secure from eavesdropping and fraud than the analog phones used by most mobile-phone customers today.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | Chris O'Brien and Tiffany Hsu
Consumers shellshocked by the escalating size and frequency of payment card hacks like the one that recently struck Target aren't likely to get much relief any time soon. If anything, security experts say, the situation will worsen for American shoppers before it improves, if it ever does. The U.S. relies largely on payment cards with magnetic strips -- described by one retail trade group as "antiquated" and especially prone to fraud -- instead of more secure systems already in place in most other countries.
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NEWS
May 9, 1991 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Bush Administration seeks to improve the federal government's none-too-stellar record on safeguarding the environment, it is running into an unexpected stumbling block in one area: its efforts to force the federal bureaucracy to recycle the 50,000 tons of memos, reports, plans and directives that it spews out every year. The security-minded are resisting it.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Amro Hassan and Kate Linthicum
CAIRO - A bomb blast ripped through a bus packed with tourists Sunday, killing at least four people near Egypt's border with Israel, security officials said, in an attack that threatened to damage the tourist economies of both countries. Three South Korean tourists and the Egyptian bus driver were killed, according to a statement from Egypt's Interior Ministry. No one has claimed responsibility, but several Israeli security experts said the location of the attack suggests it was directed at least in part at Israel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum and Kate Mather
When Congress formed the Transportation Security Administration two months after 9/11, the agency's mission was clear: Its officers would not carry guns or make arrests. Instead, they would focus on screening passengers for weapons, bombs and other dangerous materials. But the shooting death of a TSA officer at Los Angeles International Airport - the first fatality in the agency's history - could change that. On Monday, the union representing 45,000 federal security agents called for the creation of a class of armed TSA officers with law enforcement training and the authority to arrest people.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2010 | By Ken Dilanian, Tribune Washington Bureau
As the government begins deploying whole-body imaging machines to replace metal detectors at airports nationwide, some security experts worry that the new technology could make it easier, not harder, to sneak weapons and explosives onto airplanes. In the wake of the attempted Christmas Day airline bombing, the Transportation Security Administration decided to double its investment in the new machines, with a goal of installing 450 across the country by the end of the year and 1,800 by 2014.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Chris O'Brien
WASHINGTON - The White House has released guidelines aimed at prodding companies that run some of the nation's most essential services such as utilities, cellphone towers and banks to better protect themselves from cyberattacks. Officials said the guidelines, developed under an executive order that President Obama signed a year ago, provide companies overseeing the nation's crucial infrastructure with a blueprint for identifying potential threats, protecting themselves from cyberattacks and, if an attack occurs, recovering from it. But the voluntary nature of the guidelines showed how sharply proponents of strong regulation have scaled back their ambitions - and even their language - in the face of industry opposition to government intervention.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2014 | Chris O'Brien and Tiffany Hsu
Consumers shellshocked by the escalating size and frequency of payment card hacks like the one that recently struck Target aren't likely to get much relief any time soon. If anything, security experts say, the situation will worsen for American shoppers before it improves, if it ever does. The U.S. relies largely on payment cards with magnetic strips -- described by one retail trade group as "antiquated" and especially prone to fraud -- instead of more secure systems already in place in most other countries.
WORLD
February 7, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Imagine if North Korea or Iran or Venezuela deployed thousands of unmanned surveillance aircraft in search of earthbound enemies, a swarm of robotic hunters armed with lethal weaponry and their governments' go-ahead to exterminate targets. It's a frightening scenario but far from an unimaginable one, given that dozens of nations now build, program and deploy their own drones. Newly disclosed U.S. guidelines on drone warfare appear to authorize a more permissive practice of targeted killings in the global fight against terrorism than previously articulated.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Has your computer been acting a little funny lately? If so, maybe you've loaded it down with too many photos or music files, or it needs a new battery or hard drive. Another possibility: Your PC has been hijacked by a shadowy cybercrime syndicate. If so, you're not alone. In recent years, hundreds of millions of desktop and laptop PCs have been taken over by hackers — generally without the owner's knowledge — and pressed into round-the-clock digital slavery, sending spam, fishing for credit card numbers, spying on Internet traffic or logging users' keystrokes.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Chris O'Brien
WASHINGTON - The White House has released guidelines aimed at prodding companies that run some of the nation's most essential services such as utilities, cellphone towers and banks to better protect themselves from cyberattacks. Officials said the guidelines, developed under an executive order that President Obama signed a year ago, provide companies overseeing the nation's crucial infrastructure with a blueprint for identifying potential threats, protecting themselves from cyberattacks and, if an attack occurs, recovering from it. But the voluntary nature of the guidelines showed how sharply proponents of strong regulation have scaled back their ambitions - and even their language - in the face of industry opposition to government intervention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum and Kate Mather
When Congress formed the Transportation Security Administration two months after 9/11, the agency's mission was clear: Its officers would not carry guns or make arrests. Instead, they would focus on screening passengers for weapons, bombs and other dangerous materials. But the shooting death of a TSA officer at Los Angeles International Airport - the first fatality in the agency's history - could change that. On Monday, the union representing 45,000 federal security agents called for the creation of a class of armed TSA officers with law enforcement training and the authority to arrest people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2013 | By Dan Weikel and Laura J. Nelson
Despite a $1.6-billion investment in new security measures at LAX since 9/11, Friday's shooting by a gunman who made his way deep into a passenger terminal demonstrates that the airport remains vulnerable to attacks that appear costly and difficult to defend against. Lobbies, ticketing counters, baggage claim areas and sidewalks of the nine terminals at Los Angeles International Airport, the nation's third-busiest, are easily accessible to attackers intent on bringing firearms or bombs into the airport's public areas.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
At least 2 million people received the email May 16 notifying them that an order they had just made on "Wallmart's" website was being processed, though none of them had done any such thing. Still, thousands of people clicked on the link in the email, taking many of them to a harmless Google search results page for "Walmart. " Others weren't so fortunate. The link led to the invisible download of malware that covertly infected their personal computers, turning them into remotely controlled robots for hackers, according to email security firm Proofpoint Inc. These sorts of "phishing" attacks are not only becoming more common but also are getting more lethal, with fake emails becoming harder to distinguish from real ones.
TRAVEL
June 23, 2013 | By Catharine Hamm, Los Angeles Times
Question: I read with interest the articles concerning the use of magnetic stripe and Chip and PIN cards in Europe and, as a result, have just obtained a Chip and PIN card. The customer service representative added one caveat: "Bad guys" in Europe have a device that can read the PIN from some distance from the location of the transaction and can then fraudulently use it for their own purposes. She strongly advised the purchase of a protective sleeve that can thwart this illegal use. Albert P. Taylor North Tustin Answer: Every transaction carries some risk, security experts agree, but the agent seems to have conflated a couple of security concerns.
BUSINESS
June 17, 2013 | By Paresh Dave, Los Angeles Times
In late February, a thief or thieves cracked into Evernote's digital vault filled with log-ins, passwords and email addresses belonging to 50 million users. It was a shocking cyber attack considering the Redwood City, Calif., company offers online lockers for people to safely store their files. With its reputation on the line, the company quickly developed a security feature that may become the standard procedure for accessing online accounts: demanding two digital keys to gain entrance.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
At least 2 million people received the email May 16 notifying them that an order they had just made on "Wallmart's" website was being processed, though none of them had done any such thing. Still, thousands of people clicked on the link in the email, taking many of them to a harmless Google search results page for "Walmart. " Others weren't so fortunate. The link led to the invisible download of malware that covertly infected their personal computers, turning them into remotely controlled robots for hackers, according to email security firm Proofpoint Inc. These sorts of "phishing" attacks are not only becoming more common but also are getting more lethal, with fake emails becoming harder to distinguish from real ones.
NATIONAL
June 10, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian and Barbara Demick, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Security experts questioned Monday how, three years after Army Pfc. Bradley Manning downloaded a trove of secret material, low-level computer specialist Edward Snowden was able to copy documents that are far more sensitive and walk them out of his National Security Agency workplace in Hawaii. After Manning released hundreds of thousands of classified documents - for which he is now being court-martialed - government officials vowed to curtail the broad access to intelligence that came into being after the Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Robert Abele
The thriller "Erased" divides neatly by influence. When Brussels-based tech security expert Ben Logan (Aaron Eckhart) shows up for work one day, there's no trace of his company anymore, a la "Three Days of the Condor. " Like the "Bourne" movies, he's then targeted for elimination, (when we learn he's actually ex-CIA and highly skilled at killing). He's also a single dad with a teenage daughter (Liana Liberato) in tow, and that creates its fair share of peril, "Taken" you very much. As with many one-man-against-an-international-conspiracy movies, details like who did what, when, for which piece of information and why it's so important mean little once the chases, spy moves and fights hit cruise control.
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