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Security Pacific National Bank

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BUSINESS
January 9, 1986
San Diego Superior Court Judge Dennis Adams ordered the Los Angeles bank to pay $4.8 million to James Williams, who had alleged in a lawsuit that the bank's fraudulent dealings forced him to lose Viking Dodge in Los Angeles in 1979 and Baron Buick in San Diego in 1980. Improperly fulfilling its "fiduciary responsibility," Security Pacific "fraudulently induced" Williams into purchasing Viking, Adams ruled. A bank spokeswoman declined to comment, saying that the bank had not seen the ruling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Sean O'Connell
Long Beach's Pine Avenue has had its ups and downs over the last few decades. After a determined rebirth in the 1990s, a tide of prosperity rolled into the time-worn neighborhood with a bustling night life scene. That tide receded with newer developments elsewhere around town, and Pine Avenue fell into an awkward state of transition as it struggled to compete with amenities such as a Ferris wheel and a world class aquarium. However, the newly opened Federal Bar aims to bring revelers back to Pine Avenue by offering a restaurant and a music venue in the cavernous yet elegant Security Pacific National Bank building.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 1988
Security Pacific National Bank has promoted Richard K. Davis to senior vice president.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2006
Security Trust & Savings Bank opened at 148 S. Main St. Co-founder Joseph Francis Sartori went on to become one of Los Angeles' leading bankers and was still chairman of Security when he died in 1946 at age 87. After several mergers and name changes, the company Sartori helped found, by then known as Security Pacific National Bank, built a 54-story headquarters atop Bunker Hill in 1974. It was the tallest building in the city at the time.
BUSINESS
July 17, 1990
R. Bruce Owen has been named executive vice president and senior executive officer of Security Pacific National Bank.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Carl E. Hartnack, who began his career at Security Pacific Bank as a 17-year-old messenger and rose through the ranks to lead one of California's largest financial institutions, died Tuesday in Santa Barbara of Alzheimer's disease. He was 83. Hartnack, who retired as chairman of Los Angeles-based Security Pacific National Bank in 1982, oversaw the bank's statewide and international expansion, and was an advocate for the redevelopment of downtown Los Angeles in the 1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1998
An Encino mortgage broker pleaded guilty Wednesday to a federal charge of scheming to defraud Security Pacific National Bank of $1.2 million, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office. Ron Amiran, 60, a fugitive for seven years, controlled several Encino-based businesses involved in the mortgage and title industry, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1993 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former employees of Gibraltar Savings have settled their 3-year-old class action lawsuit against Security Pacific National Bank, which acquired most of the assets of the insolvent Simi Valley thrift in June, 1990, and subsequently laid off the 250 Gibraltar workers without notice. The gross amount of the settlement is $3.1 million.
BUSINESS
May 22, 1993 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vindicating Austin O. Furst, the 1980s Hollywood entrepreneur who saw his fast-growing movie and home video company collapse in bankruptcy, Inovision Inc. has been awarded $100 million in the out-of-court settlement of a 4-year old lawsuit against Security Pacific National Bank. The settlement, stemming from an alleged breach of contract over a promised loan, is believed to be one of the largest of its kind. Inovision's predecessor company, Vestron Inc.
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