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WORLD
April 28, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - The traditional Passover retelling of Exodus was barely underway in 2002 when Defense Minister Binyamin Ben-Eliezer got a note with news of the latest in a string of Palestinian suicide attacks that had terrorized Israel for two years. He dashed to an emergency meeting of military commanders, all dressed in civilian clothes because they'd left their own Seder dinner tables upon hearing that 30 Israelis had been killed in the attack on the Park Hotel. After an all-night session, they made a decision that would change the face of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: Ben-Eliezer persuaded Israel's Cabinet to reoccupy the entire West Bank, even though it meant brushing aside the 1993 Oslo agreements that gave Palestinians control over many cities and their own security force.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 16, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - A federal judge has for the first time ruled that the National Security Agency's once-secret policy of collecting the dialing records of all phone calls in the country probably violates the Constitution, a defeat for the government that could alter the political debate over the controversial program and set up an eventual review by the Supreme Court. Monday's ruling will not immediately stop the NSA's massive data collection program because U.S. District Judge Richard J. Leon immediately stayed it to give the government time to appeal.
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NEWS
September 25, 2000 | From the Washington Post
Tightened security and the threat of criminal prosecution for minor errors is becoming a bigger threat to national security than the potential loss of secrets, according to former Sen. Howard H. Baker (R-Tenn.) and former Rep. Lee Hamilton (D-Ind.
NATIONAL
July 24, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - Sharp disagreement over the future of the Guantanamo Bay detention camp dominated the first Senate hearing on the issue in four years. The meeting Wednesday of a Senate Judiciary Committee subcommittee, held in the wake of a high-profile hunger strike by inmates and renewed calls from President Obama to close the facility, made clear that deep partisan divisions remain over whether keeping the prison open is a threat to national security or a necessity. Opened at a U.S. Navy base in Cuba in the months after the Sept.
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairmen of the House and Senate foreign affairs committees pledged unqualified support Wednesday for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's security policy, undercutting Clinton administration criticism of Israel's expansion of Jewish settlements in the disputed West Bank. "There are voices who insist that it is incumbent upon the state of Israel to make all the sacrifices for peace," Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) and Rep. Benjamin A. Gilman (R-N.Y.) said in a letter to Netanyahu.
NATIONAL
March 17, 2006 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration's new national security manifesto admits no error and expresses no regret, yet it reflects how an assertive American foreign policy has grown more conciliatory and pragmatic after colliding with messy realities in Iraq and other parts of the world. The strategy document, issued by the White House this week to update a famously tough 2002 version, reaffirms a U.S. right to use preemptive force to eliminate a threat involving weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
President Bush has announced that he will name two assistant secretaries of defense, attorney Stephen J. Hadley for international security policy and Henry S. Rowen for international security affairs.
WORLD
December 29, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Saudi Arabia denied a report in Britain's Mail on Sunday newspaper that security forces had seized light planes packed with explosives near King Khalid International Airport in the capital, Riyadh, foiling a suicide plot to blow up a Western airliner. "A Saudi security official confirmed that the story ... was not true," the official Saudi Press Agency reported. The paper quoted Patrick Mercer, security policy chief for Britain's opposition Conservative Party, as saying two pilots apparently intended to crash their planes into a Western jet as it taxied.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Former Vice President Dick Cheney accused the White House of dithering over the war in Afghanistan and urged President Obama to "do what it takes to win." "Make no mistake. Signals of indecision out of Washington hurt our allies and embolden our adversaries," Cheney said while accepting an award from the Center for Security Policy. Cheney disputed remarks by White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel that the Bush administration had been adrift on the war in Afghanistan and that the Obama administration had to start from scratch to develop a war strategy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2013 | By Angel Jennings and Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
Dontez Sharpley approached the entryway to USC at Jefferson Boulevard and Trousdale Parkway late at night, expecting to make his usual trek through the campus to catch a bus home after a shift at the Starbucks across the street. But as he walked onto campus, he was stopped by a security guard, who told him he was not allowed to pass through the university unless he was a registered guest. Exasperated, Sharpley, 22, ran along the perimeter before being stopped by another guard at another checkpoint.
OPINION
June 2, 2013 | By Sarah Chayes
One of the most important parts of President Obama's landmark speech on May 23 at the National Defense University is receiving little attention. It is his call for "a strategy that reduces the wellspring of extremism," his recognition that extremism is fed, in part, by "underlying grievances and conflicts," which need to be accurately understood and addressed as an integral part of U.S. security policy. It is a welcome articulation from a president who deserves credit for beginning to formulate a long-term vision for alleviating terrorist threats.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
A change in federal policy to allow small knives and sporting goods on commercial planes has generated strong reaction from passengers, pilots and flight attendants. Join us at 2:30 p.m. PST for a live video chat with reporter Hugo Martin and representatives of flight attendants concerned about the new policy. Click back here to join in on the discussion. John Pistole, the administrator of the Transportation Security Administration, announced that starting April 25 the agency will let passengers bring small knives, golf clubs, hockey sticks, lacrosse sticks and small novelty bats into the cabin of commercial planes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2013 | By Angel Jennings and Rosanna Xia, Los Angeles Times
Dontez Sharpley approached the entryway to USC at Jefferson Boulevard and Trousdale Parkway late at night, expecting to make his usual trek through the campus to catch a bus home after a shift at the Starbucks across the street. But as he walked onto campus, he was stopped by a security guard, who told him he was not allowed to pass through the university unless he was a registered guest. Exasperated, Sharpley, 22, ran along the perimeter before being stopped by another guard at another checkpoint.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2013 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - As dean of Yale Law School, Harold Hongju Koh was among the fiercest critics of President George W. Bush's "war on terror," arguing that his administration had trampled the Constitution and tarnished America's international standing by claiming the power to capture "enemy combatants" abroad and hold them without charges at the prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The next administration must "restore the rule of law in the national security arena," end "excessive government secrecy" and set aside the "claims of unfettered executive power," Koh told a House panel in 2008.
WORLD
November 26, 2012 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Through most of the administration of Mexican President Felipe Calderon, the federal police agency has held a starring role, built to seven times its previous size and favored by American advisors and dollars despite persistent troubles and scandals. But President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto, who is meeting Tuesday with President Obama, has already demonstrated that one of his immediate actions will be to demote the police force, raising questions about his security policies at a time of heightened deadly violence across the country.
WORLD
August 21, 2012 | By Robyn DixonLos Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Washington relied for years on Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi to help crush Islamist terrorist groups in the volatile Horn of Africa. But now the charismatic strongman is gone and America's immediate concern is whether the regional fight against Al Qaeda-linked groups such as the Shabab in Somalia will drift and lose its way. Meles died late Monday after an illness that the country's leadership had kept secret for months. Ethiopian officials were at pains Tuesday to reassure the world that there would be no major policy deviations or power vacuum.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The foreign ministers of the European Community agreed Sunday that there could be "no compromise" with Iraq over the U.N. resolutions on the issue of Kuwait. At a meeting in Asolo, Italy, the senior diplomats of the 12 EC nations declared that the pressure must be kept up on Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to withdraw his forces from Kuwait, which he invaded Aug. 2.
NATIONAL
May 23, 2010 | By Lisa Mascaro and Christi Parsons, Tribune Washington Bureau
Returning to the place where he unveiled his war strategy, President Obama on Saturday presented a broad view of national security policy grounded in international cooperation, marking the latest repudiation of the foreign policy of George W. Bush. In a commencement address at West Point, Obama said U.S. security policy works best in concert with international institutions, which he acknowledged were imperfect. The strategy Obama outlined stood in stark contrast to that of his predecessor, whose approach to national security was based on the right of the United States to act unilaterally.
WORLD
April 28, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - The traditional Passover retelling of Exodus was barely underway in 2002 when Defense Minister Binyamin Ben-Eliezer got a note with news of the latest in a string of Palestinian suicide attacks that had terrorized Israel for two years. He dashed to an emergency meeting of military commanders, all dressed in civilian clothes because they'd left their own Seder dinner tables upon hearing that 30 Israelis had been killed in the attack on the Park Hotel. After an all-night session, they made a decision that would change the face of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: Ben-Eliezer persuaded Israel's Cabinet to reoccupy the entire West Bank, even though it meant brushing aside the 1993 Oslo agreements that gave Palestinians control over many cities and their own security force.
OPINION
April 10, 2011
President Obama last week decided to try Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and four other accused Sept. 11 conspirators before a military commission in the prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, rather than in a civilian court in the United States. It's the latest example of Obama, who was acidly critical of George W. Bush's policies in the war on terror, embracing those policies or acquiescing in their continuation. Explanations abound: an assertive Congress, a lack of public support, a seductive bureaucracy or a change in Obama's thinking from candidate to president.
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