Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSecurity Risk
IN THE NEWS

Security Risk

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 2, 1986 | Associated Press
The CIA should be given broad authority in firing an employee who is a homosexual if a security risk is involved, a federal appeals court said Friday. The U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that a lower court had erred by not allowing the CIA director enough leeway in the case of a CIA electronics technician who was dismissed in 1982 about 3 1/2 months after he told the agency he was a homosexual. The case was remanded to U.S. District Court for further proceedings.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | Chris O'Brien and Salvador Rodriguez
The discovery of a significant flaw in software that was supposed to provide extra protection for thousands of websites has thrown the tech world into chaos as experts scrambled to understand the scope of the vulnerability. On Tuesday, Tumblr, owned by Yahoo Inc., became the largest website to disclose that it had been hit by the "Heartbleed Bug" and urged users to change not just the password for its site but for all others as well. Signaling just how much uncertainty and confusion surrounds the glitch, security experts warned that such a gesture might actually be useless because if a site has not fixed the problem hackers could just as easily steal the new password.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 23, 1987 | From Reuters
British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher told Parliament today that the former head of the MI6 intelligence service, the late Sir Maurice Oldfield, had been a practicing homosexual. However, she said that a thorough investigation of Oldfield, who died in 1981 after serving as security coordinator in troubled Northern Ireland, had concluded that he was not a security risk.
WORLD
February 27, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
BRUSSELS - Security in Afghanistan would decrease steadily if all U.S. troops are withdrawn this year, a senior U.S. military official warned Thursday, two days after President Obama ordered the Pentagon to begin contingency planning for such a pullout. “I can't speculate what the outcome will be,” the commander said in remarks to reporters traveling with Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. “What I can tell you is Afghan forces aren't self-sustainable at the end of 2014, and over time that obviously will have an impact in terms of the security environment.” He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss military assessments.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and KRISTINA M. LUZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Imelda Marcos crawled on her knees down the long center aisle of St. Patrick's Cathedral Monday to "thank Almighty God for my vindication," the demonstration of humility and gratitude may also have represented her first steps back to the Philippines. Shortly after an American jury declared Marcos not guilty of fraud and racketeering charges, her son, Ferdinand Jr., said: "Now we can think about going home." The Times has learned that, in the last week, several of Mrs.
NATIONAL
May 7, 2009 | Washington Post
The FBI has retained almost 24,000 names on the nation's terrorist watch list without current or proper justification, while failing to include people who are subjects of terrorist investigations, according to a Justice Department report issued Wednesday. The FBI's lapses "create a risk to national security," Justice Department Inspector General Glenn A. Fine said in the report.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1998
Saul Halpert's Oct. 22 letter correctly points out belated recognition to American volunteers who fought to save democracy in Spain. Others besides the volunteers were affected by the negative attitudes growing out of that period. My sister was engaged to such a volunteer, who died during his service in Spain from pleurisy. Years later, as a federal government GS-3 typist clerk, she was summoned before a congressional subcommittee and charged with being a security risk to the U.S. (although she never worked in a sensitive position)
OPINION
January 29, 2003
Your Jan. 25 front page prominently features a color photograph of Serena Williams celebrating her victory over her big sister, Venus, in the Australian Open, while at the bottom of Page A14 is a brief article reporting a new ruling whereby airline pilots are subject to license revocation without a hearing or due process simply if they are declared to be a "security risk." Now, I'm not saying Serena Williams isn't fabulous; I'm just suggesting that perhaps the whittling away of civil liberties would be a little less alarming if more people were hit in the face with how rapidly and surreptitiously it's happening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1989 | From the Associated Press
A prosecutor has raised security concerns over the proposed temporary transfer to UC Irvine of Ramon Salcido, charged in the wine country slayings of seven people. Salcido's attorney wants the transfer so a brain scan can be conducted. Sonoma County Deputy Dist. Atty. Peter Bumerts filed a motion in Superior Court alleging that the experimental brain scan, called Positron Emission Tomography, has not been accepted as a court standard.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration signaled Saturday it does not support aspects of pending anti-piracy legislation, a setback for the Motion Picture Assn. of America, Hollywood's chief lobbying arm. The measures - which have deeply divided the entertainment and technology industries - would give the Justice Department more tools to shut down foreign websites involved in theft of movies and TV shows. Major Hollywood studios and unions have been mounting a campaign in support of the bills to combat online piracy, which costs the industry billions annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- The San Quentin News, the inmate-run newspaper at one of California's most notorious lockups, is being honored by a journalism association at the same time its operations have been suspended by prison officials. The Northern California chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists is recognizing the newspaper, one of the few of its kind in the country, with a freedom of information award for "accomplishing extraordinary journalism under extraordinary circumstances" and lifting "the curtain of secrecy that shrouds those who live behind the walls.
WORLD
January 9, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Afghan President Hamid Karzai and his top justice officials on Thursday ordered the release of 72 imprisoned terrorism suspects for lack of evidence to prosecute them, defying U.S. objections to freeing men still considered a security risk. The prisoners at the Parwan detention facility at Bagram air base, north of Kabul, were captured by U.S. and NATO forces over the course of the 12-year-old U.S.-led war in Afghanistan against the Taliban and Al Qaeda-backed militants. But a case review by Afghan officials of 88 prisoners deemed by the United States to be too dangerous to set free found enough evidence to prosecute only 16 of them, Karzai spokesman Aimal Faizi told reporters after the president met Thursday with the Afghan attorney general and justice minister.
WORLD
September 9, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- Egypt's military raids across the Sinai Peninsula appear to be the strongest offensive in years against Islamist militant networks that authorities fear are plotting a wave of attacks against government institutions and tourist resorts. Tanks and helicopter gunships for a third day Monday targeted Islamist fighters in desert villages that border Israel and the Gaza Strip. The army also has destroyed smuggling tunnels leading into Gaza, which is controlled by the Palestinian militant group Hamas, an ally of Egypt's deposed Islamist President Mohamed Morsi.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
When Thomas Trappler talks clouds, companies listen. But he's not warning about rain. Rather, Trappler is a "cloud" consultant, who tells attorneys, executives and fellow information technology experts what to look out for when they put company databases in the so-called cloud. As more companies rely on remote cloud servers to store their files, Trappler has become a highly sought-after security advisor, a celebrity of sorts in the rapidly growing cloud computing industry. "No one's teaching people about this," Trappler said.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Lookout, a smartphone security app, said its software will now flag adware -- mobile advertising that could be a security risk -- on Android devices. The company defines adware as mobile advertising that interrupts users' experience. Some malicious adware has been known to surreptitiously gather the user's contact information. Lookout updated its Android app Wednesday to quickly notify users know if they have downloaded an app that contains adware. PHOTOS: The 10 biggest tech gadget fails If Lookout detects adware has been installed on a user's phone, it will let users choose to either ignore the threat or begin a removal process that will uninstall the app containing intrusive mobile ads. The company said adware is prevalent in 6.5% of the apps found on the Google Play app store.
OPINION
March 28, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Solitary confinement in immigration detention centers across the nation is often overused and arbitrarily applied. According to data obtained by the National Immigrant Justice Center, as many as 300 immigrants, or about 1% of all detainees in the 50 largest facilities in the country, are confined to small cells on any given day, even though many pose no security risk. In many cases, they're held there for 23 hours each day without a break, often for weeks. The use of solitary confinement is troubling enough in regular state and federal prisons, where inmates held in such conditions for prolonged periods are at risk for severe mental illness and suicide, according to medical experts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1988
The conditions in the women's section of the Orange County Jail in Santa Ana, as described by the ACLU lawyers (June 7), is so degrading and "horrendous" that surely every human rights organization will be up in arms. How would it have played in Moscow had it been trumpeted, by Amnesty International and civil right advocates, that in California nonviolent women were shackled in leg irons and handcuffed, with wrist chains thrown in for bad measure? California used to be a model in prison reform that some of us in the field held up as a bright spot in the dreary landscape of penal failure, (an exception to the)
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Lookout, a smartphone security app, said its software will now flag adware -- mobile advertising that could be a security risk -- on Android devices. The company defines adware as mobile advertising that interrupts users' experience. Some malicious adware has been known to surreptitiously gather the user's contact information. Lookout updated its Android app Wednesday to quickly notify users know if they have downloaded an app that contains adware. PHOTOS: The 10 biggest tech gadget fails If Lookout detects adware has been installed on a user's phone, it will let users choose to either ignore the threat or begin a removal process that will uninstall the app containing intrusive mobile ads. The company said adware is prevalent in 6.5% of the apps found on the Google Play app store.
WORLD
February 19, 2013 | By Daniel Hernandez
MEXICO CITY -- A Facebook page in Mexico has notched tens of thousands of followers for posting detailed but unconfirmed updates on security risks in the drug-war hot zone of Tamaulipas state. Now, purported assassins have declared a bounty on the head of the page's anonymous administrator. In response, the Facebook author said the page would not stop gathering and publishing information on shootouts and highway blockades because the Tamaulipas authorities and local news outlets offer nearly zero updates on so-called "risk situations.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration signaled Saturday it does not support aspects of pending anti-piracy legislation, a setback for the Motion Picture Assn. of America, Hollywood's chief lobbying arm. The measures - which have deeply divided the entertainment and technology industries - would give the Justice Department more tools to shut down foreign websites involved in theft of movies and TV shows. Major Hollywood studios and unions have been mounting a campaign in support of the bills to combat online piracy, which costs the industry billions annually.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|