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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal Homeland Security officials said this week they can't promise security screening at Charles M. Schulz-Sonoma County Airport -- a crucial hitch that could delay the return of commercial air service. Horizon Air had planned daily flights from Santa Rosa to Los Angeles and Seattle starting in March. But the carrier cannot begin the service without security screeners to inspect baggage and search passengers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 7, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Grouse all you want about how long it takes to move through airport security lines, but there may be a good a reason for the wait: Screening agents are trained to be slow and thorough. A study by Duke University found that screeners for the Transportation Security Administration are slower at performing visual searches than amateurs, but are more accurate. The study, which was partly funded by the Department of Homeland Security, suggests that the experience TSA agents gain from searching for weapons and explosives in luggage makes them slower and more methodical at performing visual searches, not faster.
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BUSINESS
September 14, 1999 | Nancy Cleeland
In a nonbinding election, hundreds of security screeners at Los Angeles International Airport overwhelmingly voted to join the Service Employees International Union. The union sponsored the election Friday to put pressure on Argenbright Security of Atlanta, which employs about 930 security screeners and baggage handlers. The election was sanctioned by the Los Angeles City Council. But Argenbright officials said they wouldn't recognize the results.
NATIONAL
May 19, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
A man attempting to board a flight from Puerto Rico to Boston was arrested with a carry-on bag stocked with four box cutters, a switchblade knife, a stun gun and information about New York City, federal law enforcement officials said Wednesday. The man, identified as 59-year-old Jose Pol of Rhode Island, was stopped Tuesday at an airport security checkpoint after the screening of a carry-on bag led to a physical search that turned up the dangerous items, authorities said. He also carried pepper spray, two lighters, matches, scissors, a flight simulation program and a wire device that sets off an electric charge, authorities said.
OPINION
July 7, 2002
Every person who has criticized airport security and security screeners since Sept. 11 should applaud the dedication and the observation skills that resulted in the grounding of an airline piloted by two intoxicated pilots ("Pilots Drunk at Jetliner's Helm, Police Say," July 2). In this time of war and worry about homeland security it is easy to lay blame on our airport security forces. These first-line defense forces have a difficult job, are paid low wages, are met with hostility by passengers and are required to fulfill a job that can only be as good as the equipment they use and how much training they receive.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2002 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Civil Liberties Union and a major labor union sued the Department of Transportation on Thursday seeking to block a post-Sept. 11 federal requirement that airport security screeners be U.S. citizens. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles on behalf of nine California screeners, argues that the citizenship requirement is "irrational" and actually could weaken airport security by removing thousands of experienced employees from the system.
NATIONAL
June 3, 2002 | From Times wire reports
A former president of Afghanistan was removed from a transatlantic flight when security screeners mistakenly interpreted a comment he made as a threat. Sibghatullah Mojaddedi was pulled out of a boarding line Friday for a Virgin Atlantic flight from Orlando to London for a baggage search, FBI agent Wendy Evans said. Mojaddedi assumed he was singled out because he was wearing traditional Afghan clothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2008 | From City News Service
Dennis Farina pleaded no contest Thursday to a misdemeanor gun charge stemming from his May 11 arrest at Los Angeles International Airport, where security screeners discovered a handgun in the actor's briefcase. Through his attorney, the 64-year-old former star of "Law & Order" pleaded no contest to carrying a weapon in a secured area of the airport, according to Frank Mateljan of the L.A. City Attorney's Office. Los Angeles Superior Court Commissioner Mark Zuckman sentenced Farina to two years summary probation and ordered him to pay a fine and penalties totaling $1,991, Mateljan said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2002
The federal Transportation Security Administration will announce the appointment of retired former Navy Rear Adm. David M. Stone today as the federal security director for Los Angeles International Airport. Stone, who was most recently director of environmental protection, safety and occupational health in the office of the chief of naval operations, will be charged with implementing new federal security laws at LAX.
OPINION
January 16, 2002
Re "It's Just Hip When a Congressman Is Asked to Strip," Jan 11: Rep. John D. Dingell's encounter with the security screeners at Reagan National Airport brought to mind a similar encounter of mine. When I passed through a security gate, my surgically placed metallic hip implant set off the alarms. I advised the gate attendant of my then-recent surgery, to which he replied with the now-familiar, "Please take it out, put it in the basket and walk through the gate again." Walter B. Christmas Palos Verdes Estates
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2008 | From City News Service
Dennis Farina pleaded no contest Thursday to a misdemeanor gun charge stemming from his May 11 arrest at Los Angeles International Airport, where security screeners discovered a handgun in the actor's briefcase. Through his attorney, the 64-year-old former star of "Law & Order" pleaded no contest to carrying a weapon in a secured area of the airport, according to Frank Mateljan of the L.A. City Attorney's Office. Los Angeles Superior Court Commissioner Mark Zuckman sentenced Farina to two years summary probation and ordered him to pay a fine and penalties totaling $1,991, Mateljan said.
OPINION
October 23, 2007
Re "Screeners at LAX miss 75% of 'bombs,' " Oct. 19 The widespread failure of security screeners to detect increasingly sophisticated efforts to smuggle fake bomb parts merely points out that absolute air travel security is an unattainable goal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2007 | Ari B. Bloomekatz and Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writers
Passengers at Los Angeles International Airport are used to the hassles that come with heightened security: long lines, removing shoes and belts and leaving liquids behind. But they learned Thursday that despite all these precautions, security screeners missed 75% of fake bombs and explosives that passed through the airport during undercover terrorism drills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Federal Homeland Security officials said this week they can't promise security screening at Charles M. Schulz-Sonoma County Airport -- a crucial hitch that could delay the return of commercial air service. Horizon Air had planned daily flights from Santa Rosa to Los Angeles and Seattle starting in March. But the carrier cannot begin the service without security screeners to inspect baggage and search passengers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2006 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
Long and potentially dangerous security lines on sidewalks in front of terminals at Los Angeles International Airport are gone "forever," federal officials declared Wednesday. Two months ago, the city's airport agency and the airlines sent an urgent letter to federal officials expressing concern that a shortage of screeners at LAX this summer could cause lengthy queues and force travelers to wait on curbs, putting them at risk of a terrorist attack.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2004 | From Associated Press
Airports that want to replace government security screeners with privately employed workers can do so by early next summer, the Bush administration told Congress on Thursday. Thomas Blank, assistant administrator at the Transportation Security Administration, told the Senate aviation subcommittee that airports would have three options: remain in the federal system, use a private contractor to hire and train screeners, or run the screening themselves. They can apply for a change in November.
OPINION
October 23, 2007
Re "Screeners at LAX miss 75% of 'bombs,' " Oct. 19 The widespread failure of security screeners to detect increasingly sophisticated efforts to smuggle fake bomb parts merely points out that absolute air travel security is an unattainable goal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2003 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Now that the city has revoked the badges of 285 federal airport security screeners for failing to submit their fingerprints or having criminal records, the City Council wants Los Angeles International Airport officials to explain their efforts to protect against terrorists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2003 | Jennifer Oldham, Times Staff Writer
With the busy holiday travel season set to start this week, city officials and airlines worry that a shortage of federal security screeners at Los Angeles International Airport will lead to long lines and flight delays. "We are concerned enough that we are going to go back to what we haven't done since 9/11, and that is to tell people to get here two hours early for a domestic flight and three hours early for an international flight," said Paul Haney, a spokesman for the city's airport agency.
OPINION
October 21, 2003 | Brian Michael Jenkins, Brian Michael Jenkins has studied terrorism for more than 30 years and is a special advisor at the Rand Corp. He was a member of the White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security in 1996-97.
The arrest of Nathaniel T. Heatwole on charges of smuggling box cutters, bleach and matches aboard two commercial airliners reminds us that, despite significant improvements since Sept. 11, our security systems are not perfect. They never will be. These items, of course, should have been detected by the security screeners and, barring that, they never should have remained undetected for five weeks on airliners that should be checked before each flight. But let's not panic yet.
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