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BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO — As it closes in on 1 billion users, Facebook Inc. has formed partnerships with five security software outfits to crack down on pfishing schemes. Facebook said Wednesday that Microsoft Corp., McAfee Inc., Trend Micro Inc., Sophos Ltd. and Symantec Corp. will join the fight to keep its users from sharing links to sites that install malware. Facebook also has its own tools in its arsenal and a vast database of malicious URLs. Facebook users, who number more than 900 million, post a ton of links, some from blacklisted sites.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The 1,000 most popular websites in the world are now safe from the Heartbleed vulnerability, but 2% of the top 1 million websites remain unsecure, a security firm recently said. Cyber security firm Sucuri Inc. said it scanned the top websites as ranked by Alexa Internet, a company that collects Web traffic data, to test how many of them remain vulnerable to Heartbleed, a bug that was recently discovered. Heartbleed is a hole in OpenSSL, a security software used by most websites, that gives hackers an entryway to steal sensitive user data, including passwords.
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BUSINESS
March 16, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Shares of security software makers fell, led by Check Point Software Technologies Ltd. (CHKP), on concern that the stocks have risen too high too quickly. Check Point, which makes software that guards computer networks against hackers, tumbled $38.19, or 15%, to $208.69--its biggest decline since April 5. VeriSign Inc. (VRSN), a maker of software used to issue computerized IDs, slid $22.88 to $194.75, while rival Entrust Technologies Inc. (ENTU) fell $13.38 to $99.13.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
Over the last couple of days, the word "Heartbleed" has entered the popular lexicon thanks a gaping hole discovered in a commonly used piece of security software. But where did the name come from? And what does it mean?  Video: Protecting against Heartbleed The bug was named by an engineer at Codenomicon, a cybersecurity company that has offices in Finland and Silicon Valley, according to an interview posted by Vocativ .  "Heatbleed" was discovered separately and simultaneously a few days ago by Google security researchers and engineers at Codenomicon.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Netscape Communications Corp. on Monday said that it received U.S. Commerce Department approval to export some of its security software. The Mountain View-based company also said it was negotiating with the government for approval to export even stronger security software, which could be used by financial institutions. The U.S.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Shares of security software makers surged Wednesday on optimism that recent Internet-related computer crimes will spur increased demand. ISS Group Inc. (ticker symbol: ISSX), the No. 1 maker of software to detect hacker attacks and network weaknesses, jumped $7.88, or 11%, to $81.75. SonicWall Inc. (SNWL), which makes software used to guard consumers' computers, surged $10.50, or 17%, to $72.75. RSA Security Inc. (RSAS), whose products scramble data, gained $10.75, or 20%, to $63.75.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2000
Litronic Inc., an Irvine provider of Internet security products, said Tuesday that it has received a $500,000 security software order from the U.S. Department of Defense. Litronic said in a press release that the agency is licensing a software package that enables a digital signature and coding system to run on Windows 95, 98, NT and 2000 within the department's messaging system. The messaging system is secure for all organizational and individual correspondence within the Armed Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1989
An accomplice in a major computer hacking case who helped steal a $1-million Digital Equipment Corp. security software program was sentenced Wednesday to five years' probation. Leonard DiCicco, a one-time friend of computer hacker Kevin Mitnick, was sentenced in Los Angeles by U.S. District Judge Mariana Pfaelzer, who also ordered him to serve 750 hours of community service, part of which will be spent installing a computer system at an Anaheim homeless shelter.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Israeli cybersecurity researchers claim to have found a major hole in Samsung's Knox security software that leaves Galaxy S 4 devices used for enterprise and government work vulnerable to hackers. The reported security hole makes it possible for malware to intercept secure data, such as emails, on GS4 smartphones that are supposed to be protected by the Knox software, according to the Wall Street Journal . The Knox platform is designed so that users can keep their personal data on the same device as their sensitive, work-related data, which is protected separately by the Samsung security software.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2000 | Bloomberg News, Reuters
Shares of security software makers continued rocketing Thursday in the wake of attacks on major Web sites, though some observers said the two-day run-up had the look of a mania. Check Point Software Technologies Ltd. (CHKP), which makes software used to protect computer networks, jumped $32.25 to $180.25. SonicWall Inc. (SNWL), which makes software used to guard consumers' computers, gained $26.25 to $99. Software maker Network Associates (NETA) rallied $3.81 to $27.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2014 | By Maija Palmer
There is a sense of despair when it comes to privacy in the digital age. Many of us assume that so much of our electronic information is now compromised, whether by corporations or government agencies, that there is little that can be done about it. Sometimes we try to rationalize this by telling ourselves that privacy may no longer matter so much. After all, an upstanding citizen should have nothing to fear from surveillance. In "Dragnet Nation: A Quest for Privacy, Security and Freedom in a World of Relentless Surveillance," author Julia Angwin seeks to challenge that defeatism.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
While Apple and Microsoft saw their share of laptops sold to businesses and other organizations in the U.S. decrease in 2013, Google dramatically increased its portion of sales. From January through November, Google sold 1.76 million Chromebook laptops in the U.S., up from 400,000 during the same period in 2012, according to a recent report by NPD Group . that tracked sales through commercial channels. That includes devices that were sold to businesses, government agencies, schools and other organizations.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Israeli cybersecurity researchers claim to have found a major hole in Samsung's Knox security software that leaves Galaxy S 4 devices used for enterprise and government work vulnerable to hackers. The reported security hole makes it possible for malware to intercept secure data, such as emails, on GS4 smartphones that are supposed to be protected by the Knox software, according to the Wall Street Journal . The Knox platform is designed so that users can keep their personal data on the same device as their sensitive, work-related data, which is protected separately by the Samsung security software.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
... Well, maybe not so excellent. In the latest installments of the Los Angeles Unified School District's $1-billion marketing venture with Apple Inc. -- excuse me, I meant its visionary effort to equip every pupil with 21st century educational technology -- the district has found that scores of its $678 tablets have gone missing. Students have been able to hack their way easily past security software designed to keep them off prohibited websites. As my colleagues Howard Blume and Stephen Ceasar have documented , students at three schools have been told to surrender their iPads, though they say they haven't been told why. At other schools, they're forbidden to take them home.  The iPad rollout, they say, is in "chaos.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
Two hackers from Irvine gained access in April to the air conditioning and water systems of a Google Inc. office in Sydney, Australia. Because Google had failed to install a security patch to a software program that remotely tracks and controls building systems, the hackers could have easily raised the office's temperature to an unbearable level or caused water pipes to burst by increasing pressure. Luckily for Google, the hackers were working for Cylance Inc., an Irvine company that has been grabbing headlines for uncovering security holes that could allow malicious hackers to do serious damage to crucial infrastructure such as hospitals, oil pipelines and banking systems.
BUSINESS
July 10, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google Chromebook laptops may be finally catching on and there are a few good reasons. The computers, which run Google's Chrome OS software, accounted for 20% to 25% of all laptops sold for less than $300 in the U.S. in the last eight months, according to NPD Group, a market research firm. A year ago, Chromebook's market share was insignificant, according to NPD Group. But that started to change late last year when a new wave of the Google computers started coming out along with a new marketing campaign . PHOTOS: Rare and vintage auctioned Apple items A Samsung-made Chromebook is currently the top-selling laptop on Amazon.com . Why are people buying Chromebooks?
BUSINESS
April 25, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
As it closes in on 1 billion users, Facebook has formed partnerships with five security software outfits to crack down on pfishing schemes. Facebook said Wednesday that Microsoft, McAfee, Trend Micro, Sophos and Symantec will join the fight to keep its users from sharing links to sites that install malware. Facebook also has its own tools in its arsenal and a vast database of malicious URLs. Facebook users, who number more than 900 million, post a ton of links, some from blacklisted sites.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The 1,000 most popular websites in the world are now safe from the Heartbleed vulnerability, but 2% of the top 1 million websites remain unsecure, a security firm recently said. Cyber security firm Sucuri Inc. said it scanned the top websites as ranked by Alexa Internet, a company that collects Web traffic data, to test how many of them remain vulnerable to Heartbleed, a bug that was recently discovered. Heartbleed is a hole in OpenSSL, a security software used by most websites, that gives hackers an entryway to steal sensitive user data, including passwords.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
It reads like a riveting sci-fi novel, but it's stunningly real: A super-sophisticated malicious computer virus burrowed its way into Iran's nuclear facilities and took down several parts of the operation. Oh, and it apparently came from us.  In 2010, it was the U.S. who launched Stuxnet, a seek-and-destroy cyber missile so sophisticated that some briefly thought it might have an other-than-earthly origin, against Iran's nuclear infrastructure, according to a New York Times report . The virus was, in fact, created jointly by the U.S. and Israel.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO — As it closes in on 1 billion users, Facebook Inc. has formed partnerships with five security software outfits to crack down on pfishing schemes. Facebook said Wednesday that Microsoft Corp., McAfee Inc., Trend Micro Inc., Sophos Ltd. and Symantec Corp. will join the fight to keep its users from sharing links to sites that install malware. Facebook also has its own tools in its arsenal and a vast database of malicious URLs. Facebook users, who number more than 900 million, post a ton of links, some from blacklisted sites.
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