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OPINION
November 20, 2010 | By Patrick Smith
The deployment of body scanners at U.S. airports is rightly controversial. The devices raise very important privacy issues, and possibly health issues as well, both of which The Times' Nov. 17 editorial "Shut up and be scanned" says are outweighed by security concerns. One downside to this debate, however, is that it distracts us somewhat from asking important questions about the Transportation Security Administration's approach to security overall. The scanners are part and parcel of what has become an unsustainable security strategy; that is, treating each and every passenger, whether an infant child or a uniformed crew member, as a potential terrorist, while attempting to inspect their bodies and belongings for each and every possible weapon.
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BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | Chris O'Brien and Salvador Rodriguez
The discovery of a significant flaw in software that was supposed to provide extra protection for thousands of websites has thrown the tech world into chaos as experts scrambled to understand the scope of the vulnerability. On Tuesday, Tumblr, owned by Yahoo Inc., became the largest website to disclose that it had been hit by the "Heartbleed Bug" and urged users to change not just the password for its site but for all others as well. Signaling just how much uncertainty and confusion surrounds the glitch, security experts warned that such a gesture might actually be useless because if a site has not fixed the problem hackers could just as easily steal the new password.
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SPORTS
July 26, 2011 | By Helene Elliott
Once, all that stood between spectators and an Olympic event was a ticket-taker. But like the world, the Olympics have become complicated since a terrorist attack led to the deaths of 11 Israelis and a police officer at the 1972 Munich Games and a woman was killed by a bomb planted in Atlanta's Centennial Olympic Park in 1996, 15 years ago Wednesday. When the London Olympics begin in one year, hundreds of thousands of spectators will go through multiple layers of security and an airport-like check to enter the 32 venues.
WORLD
January 9, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - Nearly seven in 10 Mexican city dwellers believe that crime has rendered their cities unsafe, according to a new poll that underscores the ongoing challenge facing President Enrique Peña Nieto, who took office more than a year ago promising to beat back the lawlessness that affects law-abiding Mexicans. The December poll was released late Wednesday and is the second of its kind to be produced by Mexico's National Institute of Statistics and Geography. [Link in Spanish]
WORLD
May 4, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
European Union foreign ministers agreed to draft the EU's first common European security strategy in a bid to avoid future diplomatic rifts like that over the war in Iraq. An EU source said ministers from 25 current and future member states, meeting on a luxury cruise yacht moored in the harbor of the most easterly Greek island, Kastellorizon, reached agreement after a debate on defense and transatlantic relations.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2006 | Caroline Daniel, Financial Times
The White House today will back away from the use of preemptive military strikes against perceived terrorist threats in its new National Security Strategy. However, it will harden its rhetoric against Russia, China and notably Iran, in the first formal review of foreign policy since the invasion of Iraq. The strategic report, to be published today, presents the first significant revision of the landmark 2002 document.
OPINION
July 2, 2012 | By Max Boot
Is there any organization outside of Hollywood more prey to intellectual fads than the Department of Defense? A decade ago the buzzword around the Pentagon was "transformation. " Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld wanted to force radical change to take advantage of information technology. So the individual services took to justifying every program, even hulking tanks and massive aircraft carriers, as "transformational. " Then, as the armed forces became more deeply embroiled in Iraq and Afghanistan, the buzzword became counterinsurgency, or "COIN.
BUSINESS
February 1, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Microsoft, stung by several high-profile software viruses over the last year, said it hired a PricewaterhouseCoopers forensics consultant to oversee security strategy. Scott Charney, principal for digital risk management and forensics at PricewaterhouseCoopers, will assume the role of chief of security strategy April 1. He is replacing Howard Schmidt, who has left for a position with the federal government. Charney joins Microsoft as security becomes the largest software maker's No. 1 priority.
WORLD
January 9, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - Nearly seven in 10 Mexican city dwellers believe that crime has rendered their cities unsafe, according to a new poll that underscores the ongoing challenge facing President Enrique Peña Nieto, who took office more than a year ago promising to beat back the lawlessness that affects law-abiding Mexicans. The December poll was released late Wednesday and is the second of its kind to be produced by Mexico's National Institute of Statistics and Geography. [Link in Spanish]
WORLD
May 21, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- The Mexican government poured army troops -- and high-level delegations -- into western Mexico on Tuesday in a bid to take back control of a region long besieged by a deadly drug cartel. The operation in the Pacific state of Michoacan is the first major military deployment targeting drug traffickers to be ordered by the government of President Enrique Peña Nieto, which is still struggling to publicly define its security strategy six months after assuming leadership of this violent country.
OPINION
December 27, 2013 | By Benjamin H. Friedman and Christopher Preble
A recent Pew Research poll finds that historically high numbers of Americans want their government to do less abroad. That worries many foreign policy elites, who fear that bad wars and growing debt are reviving old-fashioned isolationism. But the public is neither isolationist nor misguided when it comes to foreign policy. Americans do not want to withdraw from the world; they just prefer not to try to run it with their military. A security strategy made to match those preferences - what we and others call restraint - would keep us out of avoidable trouble and husband our resources, ultimately making us safer and richer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
In the wake of last month's deadly shooting at Los Angeles International Airport, a local congresswoman has called for improvements to airport security, including the permanent assignment of armed police officers near passenger screening checkpoints. Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) also urged law enforcement officials to allow airport police to have access to all airport security cameras. "I believe these recommendations will play a vital role in ensuring that all travelers and airport employees are safe in our nation's airports," said Waters, whose district includes LAX. Waters made the request on Thursday in a letter sent to John Pistole, head of the Transportation Security Administration, which is responsible for screening passengers at the nation's commercial airports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2013 | By Robin Abcarian, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
Every time I cross the border into Mexico, drive along the Tijuana river and head west up the hill toward the ocean, I feel a little bit sick. Believe me, it's not the water. It's the wall. Undulating gently over hilly terrain from the San Ysidro border before it drops into the Pacific at Imperial Beach, the double barrier, complete with stadium lights, is an infuriating symbol of our hypocritical relationship with Mexico and the impoverished souls who steal across the border to pick our strawberries, clean our toilets, mow our lawns.
WORLD
May 31, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
SINGAPORE - Chuck Hagel emerged from combat in the Vietnam War with two Purple Hearts and "a sense of how important it would be for America to engage wisely in Asia," as he put it to top defense officials gathered here. Now, more than a year after President Obama pledged to refocus America's security strategy toward Asia, Hagel is using his first visit to the region as Defense chief to reassure allies that the so-called pivot won't be derailed by Pentagon budget cuts or competing demands from the civil war in Syria, the nuclear stalemate with Iran and other high-priority issues.
WORLD
May 21, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- The Mexican government poured army troops -- and high-level delegations -- into western Mexico on Tuesday in a bid to take back control of a region long besieged by a deadly drug cartel. The operation in the Pacific state of Michoacan is the first major military deployment targeting drug traffickers to be ordered by the government of President Enrique Peña Nieto, which is still struggling to publicly define its security strategy six months after assuming leadership of this violent country.
WORLD
March 27, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Some of the most important civic groups in Mexico are imploring President Enrique Peña Nieto to let Congress debate the wisdom of creating a new paramilitary police force, or gendarmerie, to combat the persistent scourge of violence here. The civic groups are concerned that Peña Nieto will create the new force by presidential decree, instead of introducing a bill in the Legislature. Without a vigorous debate in Congress, the groups fear, the gendarmerie may suffer from an ill-defined mandate and lack important human rights protocols, among other things.
WORLD
March 27, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Some of the most important civic groups in Mexico are imploring President Enrique Peña Nieto to let Congress debate the wisdom of creating a new paramilitary police force, or gendarmerie, to combat the persistent scourge of violence here. The civic groups are concerned that Peña Nieto will create the new force by presidential decree, instead of introducing a bill in the Legislature. Without a vigorous debate in Congress, the groups fear, the gendarmerie may suffer from an ill-defined mandate and lack important human rights protocols, among other things.
NATIONAL
May 1, 2002 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration's homeland security strategy is too narrowly focused on preventing a recurrence of the Sept. 11 attacks while paying little attention to new forms of terrorism, a prominent research group concluded Tuesday in one of the most sweeping assessments of the new policy to date.
WORLD
March 10, 2013 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - They elected a youthful president, a self-styled defender of democratic principles who promised to bring the country up to 21st century standards. But many Mexicans suspected that an old-fashioned dinosaur heart was beating beneath Enrique Peña Nieto's smartly tailored suits, an inheritance from his Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, whose top-down, quasi-authoritarian rule defined much of Mexico's 20th century history. On Sunday, after 100 days of living under Peña Nieto's rule, the Mexican people have a better idea of the ways in which their 46-year-old president, and his vintage political party, plan to manage the future of the United States' southern neighbor, a country rife with promise and peril.
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
LEXINGTON, Va. - President Obama's chief foreign policy achievement in his first term was his order to carry out the daring raid in Pakistan that killed Osama bin Laden. But Mitt Romney challenged his rival on that turf Monday, arguing that Obama has not done enough to secure peace in the Middle East, allowing terrorist networks to build strength while “leaving our destiny at the mercy of events.” During a formal foreign policy address at the Virginia Military Institute here in Lexington, Romney said Americans should take pride  “in the blows that our military and intelligence professionals have inflicted on Al Qaeda ” in Pakistan and Afghanistan - which he called “real achievements won at a high cost.”  But he argued that Al Qaeda “remains a strong force in Yemen and Somalia, in Libya and other parts of North Africa, in Iraq, and now in Syria.” “Drones and the modern instruments of war are important tools in our fight, but they are no substitute for a national security strategy for the Middle East,” Romney said.
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