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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Michael Finnegan, David Zahniser and Doug Smith
In January, President Obama announced a block-by-block approach to relieving poverty in Los Angeles. Federal money, he said, would pour into a newly created Promise Zone. The boundaries encompassed crowded immigrant communities around MacArthur Park and Koreatown, as well as upscale areas of Hollywood and Los Feliz. Left out was South L.A., where the poverty rate is higher. The exclusion stunned many South L.A. leaders. The strategy, presidential aides said, was to concentrate resources in communities where nonprofits or public agencies had already received one of the Obama administration's signature urban renewal grants.
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BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
There should be a rule--or even a law--that politicians who propose "fixes" to Social Security should at least show they know something about the program. By that standard, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., would flunk. What's worse, his misunderstandings--heck, let's go ahead and call them misrepresentations--are aimed at taking your money. What's at issue is a passage in the budget resolution Ryan released today , the fourth annual version of his "Path to Prosperity" budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
A team of tech-savvy students from North Hollywood High clinched the national championship this past weekend in Maryland at the CyberPatriot VI competition, which tests their cyber-security knowledge.  Composed of 11th-graders, Team Azure -- Henry Birge-Lee, Isaac Kim, Jacob King, Issac Kim and Travis Raser -- beat out 11 other teams in the competition Friday in National Harbor, Md. The win marks a first for the high school and...
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: I'm the president of our homeowner association mainly because no one else wants the job. We live in a prestigious area of Los Angeles and have fewer than 30 units. Because nobody wants to be on our board we hired a management company. They're not a California company. Their head office is out of state, and we've never seen or been to their California place of business and do not know where it is or that they even have a California office. A management representative came and picked up our files and documents, including owners' personal information and accounts, and gave us their P.O. box number.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Parachute jumpers, a 16-year-old daredevil and a sleeping security guard have made the site of the nation's tallest building -- and the nation's worst terrorist attack -- look dangerously easy to breach. On Friday, the security chief for New York City's World Trade Center complex resigned, his company's spokesman confirmed in an email to the Los Angeles Times. David Velazquez had been working since last August as assistant security director for the real estate firm Durst Organization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
The lessons learned from the emergency response to last November's deadly shooting at Los Angeles International Airport will be reviewed Friday during a congressional committee hearing at LAX. The shooting raised immediate questions about airport security and emergency reponse, prompting in-depth evaluations of communication systems, crowd-control measures, evacuation procedures and when paramedics may enter active shooter situations. This week, a Transportation Security Administration report recommended -- among many things -- an increased police presence at ticket counters and screening areas.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Tony Perry
In his scathing and deeply reported examination of the U.S. Border Patrol, Todd Miller argues that the agency has gone rogue since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, trampling on the dignity and rights of the undocumented with military-style tactics. "The U.S. Border Patrol is not just the 'men in green,' it is a much larger complex and industrial world that spans from robotics, engineers, salespeople and detention centers to the incoming generation of children in its Explorer programs," Miller writes in "Border Patrol Nation: Dispatches From the Front Lines of Homeland Security.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Gay rights advocates in Michigan cheered Atty. Gen. Eric H. Holder Jr.'s announcement Friday that the federal government will recognize about 300 same-sex marriages hastily performed March 22. But the small victory translates to more complications for some newlyweds. After a federal judge struck down the state's gay marriage ban March 21, Deborah Dolney, 28, and her fiancee, Jessie-Mae Secord, 33, seized the opportunity to get married. Four counties opened their offices the next day to issue marriage licenses, and Dolney and Secord were among those in line.
OPINION
March 27, 2014 | Sarah Chayes
On Feb. 20, Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan fired his respected central bank governor, who was trying to discover what had happened to an estimated $20 billion that disappeared from the nation's oil revenue over an 18-month period. Four days later, across the country in the parched northeast, members of the Boko Haram extremist group attacked a public boarding school, shooting children in their sleep and setting school buildings afire. It was the latest in a string of massacres by the group, whose statements call for an Islamic state ruled by sharia law in Nigeria.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard and Walter Hamilton
Putting to rest one of its biggest remaining headaches, Bank of America Corp. has agreed to pay $9.5 billion to settle claims by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The government-sponsored mortgage finance giants had demanded compensation from the Charlotte, N.C., bank for losses on securities backed by faulty loans issued during the housing boom. The bank said the settlement, announced Wednesday, resolves all claims against BofA by the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the agency that regulates Fannie and Freddie.
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