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TRAVEL
March 24, 2014 | By Catharine Hamm
Question: A client who was traveling for the holidays stayed at a luxury hotel in Miami. She used the hotel's VIP butler services. As she prepared to leave, the butler packed the trunk. She locked it in the presence of several other persons and did not unlock it until she arrived, by private jet, at her next location, where she discovered expensive clothing and jewelry were missing, about $35,000 worth. She began to wonder: Is this the only luxury hotel where something like this can happen to its guest?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Carla Rivera and Kate Mather
In the wake of some wide-ranging breaches in credit card data, Mastercard and Visa this month announced an initiative to increase payment security, including expanding chip technology in the U.S. “The recent high-profile breaches have served as a catalyst for much-needed collaboration between the retail and financial services industry on the issue of payment security,” Ryan McInerney, president of Visa Inc., said in a statement this month....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2014 | By Kate Mather and Carla Rivera
The California Department of Motor Vehicles said Saturday that it is investigating a potential security breach of its credit card processing services, but officials said the agency had no immediate evidence that its computer system had been hacked. The DMV was alerted by law enforcement officials about the possible breach and has "heightened monitoring" of all of its Web traffic and credit card transactions, the agency said in a prepared statement. The agency is also in contact with credit card companies and the vendor who processes its online transactions.
SPORTS
March 21, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
The Lakers aren't going anywhere this season, and Ryan Kelly might not be either. For Kelly, that would be a good thing. It would mean he's still in the NBA. A late second-round pick out of Duke in last year's draft, the 6-foot-11 power forward wasn't even assured of making the Lakers' roster. The rookie didn't have a full preseason to prove himself because he was still recovering from surgery to repair a screw that was first inserted in his right foot to stabilize a broken bone in March 2012.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
It's no secret that if you really want to destroy a business, just hack away at its customer service. (Sears has been testing this axiom with considerable vigor.) The principle also holds true for government programs, which is why you should be very suspicious about the relentless budget-cutting at the Social Security Administration. Mark Miller of Reuters brings us up to date on this underhanded campaign, which involves closing field offices by the score, satellite offices by the hundreds and service staff by the thousands.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Lee is making some changes in his life. He wants to know what happens if he renounces his U.S. citizenship and becomes instead a citizen of the Philippines. Can he keep receiving Social Security checks? An intriguing scenario. Lee doesn't say why he wants to switch teams, but it could have something to do with taxes. A number of Americans jump ship each year because they're displeased with the U.S. tax system. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions In any case, the Social Security Administration does have a status for ex-citizens who may be due monthly checks.
WORLD
March 17, 2014 | By Amro Hassan
CAIRO  - A state-appointed human rights panel on Monday blamed both sides for the deadly violence seven months ago when security forces broke up protest camps set up by supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi. The National Council for Human Rights, releasing its findings at a news conference, said it had confirmed the deaths of 632 people, most of them protesters. Egyptian and international human rights groups have put the toll over several days in mid-August at nearly double that.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Months after an airport screener was killed in a shooting rampage at Los Angeles International Airport, a new report concludes that adding more security measures at the nation's airports may not be worth the cost. The study goes on to suggest that it might even make sense to relax some of the existing security tactics. "It may be time to reduce security," said John Mueller, a professor of political science at Ohio State University who wrote the report with Mark G. Stewart, a civil engineering professor at the University of Newcastle in Australia.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Months after an airport screener was killed in a shooting rampage at Los Angeles International Airport, a new report concludes that adding more security measures at the nation's airports may not be worth the cost. The study goes on to suggest that it might even make sense to relax some of the existing security tactics. “It may be time to reduce security,” said John Mueller, a professor of political science at Ohio State University who co-authored the report with Mark G. Stewart, a civil engineering professor at the University of Newcastle in Australia.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | Liz Weston, Money Talk
Dear Liz: I am 55 and my wife is 65. She only worked a few part-time jobs as she spent most of her working years raising our nine beautiful children. My question is, since she does not have enough credits to collect Social Security on her own work record, can she claim spousal benefits on my work history? If so, at what age and how will it affect my benefits? Answer: Your wife can receive spousal benefits based on your work record, but those checks can't start until you're old enough to qualify for benefits at age 62 (when she's 72)
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