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Sedimentary Rock

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SCIENCE
March 21, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
More than 200 million years ago, toothy crocodile-like creatures stalked a hot, dry mega-continent while squid-like mollusks with spiral shells drifted in the surrounding ocean. Then, in what passes for an instant in geologic time, they vanished - making way for the age of the dinosaurs. How some 50% of terrestrial vertebrates and an even larger share of marine life died off in the late Triassic period has become more clear from new research published online Thursday in the journal Science.
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SCIENCE
December 9, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Billions of years ago, when early life was just taking hold on Earth, Mars was home to an ancient lake filled with the right chemical ingredients for life to thrive, scientists said Monday. Drilling into dry rock, NASA's Curiosity rover has discovered signs that Gale Crater was once watery, perhaps ringed with ice and snow, and could potentially have hosted an entire Martian biosphere based on a type of microbe found in caves on Earth. Such primitive organisms, called chemolithoautotrophs, feed on chemicals found in rocks and make their own energy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1999
Australian scientists have unearthed the earliest direct evidence of when the world's microorganisms began to produce oxygen, shedding more light on the mystery surrounding the start of life as we know it. Roger Summons and colleagues at the Australian Geological Survey Organization in Canberra report in today's Nature that they found "molecular fossils" in 2.5-billion-year-old sedimentary rocks from the Mount McRae shale in western Australia.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Meet the king of gore, a "bad grandpa" of Tyrannosaurus rex that tore through flesh with banana-shaped, meat-cleaver teeth. Lythronax argestes , which translates roughly as Southwestern king of gore, appeared on the ancient island continent of Laramidia around 80 million years ago, when a rising inland sea divided the North American continent, according to a study published Wednesday in the online journal PLOS One. That's a much...
HOME & GARDEN
January 25, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL and TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stone has been popular since mankind began building things. In some areas, especially deserts, it often was the only building material available. We use reinforced concrete for most of our edifices today, but the pyramids of Egypt and the great temples of Greece and Rome were built of stone. Today's homeowners like stone for its beauty and its durability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1994 | Researched by JULIE SHEER / Los Angeles Times
Craggy or rounded, green or purple, the mountains that ring the San Fernando Valley have many faces. Although their geologic histories are similar, the Santa Susanas and the Santa Monicas are youngsters compared to the granddaddy of our mountains, the San Gabriels. Before there was a San Fernando Valley, seas covered the area and dried up, leaving sediment that turned into rock. Underwater volcanoes erupted to the west, spewing lava.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2013 | By Amina Khan
The Curiosity rover will probably be wielding its drill for the first time on a veined rock on Mars within a couple of weeks, NASA scientists said Tuesday. Using the drill would be a milestone for the Mars Science Laboratory mission, which has been testing each of the rover's suite of instruments on Martian rocks since landing on the Red Planet on Aug. 5. “Drilling is in a sense really the most significant engineering thing that  we've done since landing,” mission project manager Richard Cook said at a briefing at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge.
SCIENCE
June 5, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
It's not the missing link between man and apes. But a mouse-sized tarsier that devoured insects in ancient China 55 million years ago could be a long-lost cousin who scampered in the treetops of tropical forests around the time the first primates arose in Asia, according to scientists. A team of paleontolgists carefully peeled apart layers of sedimentary rock containing the fossil, found in China 10 years ago. Then they took the two complementary sections, each of which had parts of the fossilized primate, and subjected them to a sophisticated X-ray technique at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France.
SCIENCE
December 9, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Billions of years ago, when early life was just taking hold on Earth, Mars was home to an ancient lake filled with the right chemical ingredients for life to thrive, scientists said Monday. Drilling into dry rock, NASA's Curiosity rover has discovered signs that Gale Crater was once watery, perhaps ringed with ice and snow, and could potentially have hosted an entire Martian biosphere based on a type of microbe found in caves on Earth. Such primitive organisms, called chemolithoautotrophs, feed on chemicals found in rocks and make their own energy.
SCIENCE
March 30, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Fossilized imprints of raindrops that were sealed into stone 2.7 billion years ago indicate that Earth's early atmosphere could have been packed with greenhouse gases, according to new research that addresses a long-standing paradox of the planet's early history. About 2 billion years ago, the young sun was far less bright, emitting less than 85% of the light and heat it puts out today. With such weak sunlight, Earth should have remained frozen. But ancient water-damaged rocks and algae-like fossils show clear evidence that there was indeed liquid water in the distant past.
SCIENCE
June 5, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
It's not the missing link between man and apes. But a mouse-sized tarsier that devoured insects in ancient China 55 million years ago could be a long-lost cousin who scampered in the treetops of tropical forests around the time the first primates arose in Asia, according to scientists. A team of paleontolgists carefully peeled apart layers of sedimentary rock containing the fossil, found in China 10 years ago. Then they took the two complementary sections, each of which had parts of the fossilized primate, and subjected them to a sophisticated X-ray technique at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France.
SCIENCE
March 21, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
More than 200 million years ago, toothy crocodile-like creatures stalked a hot, dry mega-continent while squid-like mollusks with spiral shells drifted in the surrounding ocean. Then, in what passes for an instant in geologic time, they vanished - making way for the age of the dinosaurs. How some 50% of terrestrial vertebrates and an even larger share of marine life died off in the late Triassic period has become more clear from new research published online Thursday in the journal Science.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2013 | By Amina Khan
The Curiosity rover will probably be wielding its drill for the first time on a veined rock on Mars within a couple of weeks, NASA scientists said Tuesday. Using the drill would be a milestone for the Mars Science Laboratory mission, which has been testing each of the rover's suite of instruments on Martian rocks since landing on the Red Planet on Aug. 5. “Drilling is in a sense really the most significant engineering thing that  we've done since landing,” mission project manager Richard Cook said at a briefing at Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge.
SCIENCE
March 30, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Fossilized imprints of raindrops that were sealed into stone 2.7 billion years ago indicate that Earth's early atmosphere could have been packed with greenhouse gases, according to new research that addresses a long-standing paradox of the planet's early history. About 2 billion years ago, the young sun was far less bright, emitting less than 85% of the light and heat it puts out today. With such weak sunlight, Earth should have remained frozen. But ancient water-damaged rocks and algae-like fossils show clear evidence that there was indeed liquid water in the distant past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1999
Australian scientists have unearthed the earliest direct evidence of when the world's microorganisms began to produce oxygen, shedding more light on the mystery surrounding the start of life as we know it. Roger Summons and colleagues at the Australian Geological Survey Organization in Canberra report in today's Nature that they found "molecular fossils" in 2.5-billion-year-old sedimentary rocks from the Mount McRae shale in western Australia.
HOME & GARDEN
January 25, 1997 | JOHN O'DELL and TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stone has been popular since mankind began building things. In some areas, especially deserts, it often was the only building material available. We use reinforced concrete for most of our edifices today, but the pyramids of Egypt and the great temples of Greece and Rome were built of stone. Today's homeowners like stone for its beauty and its durability.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Meet the king of gore, a "bad grandpa" of Tyrannosaurus rex that tore through flesh with banana-shaped, meat-cleaver teeth. Lythronax argestes , which translates roughly as Southwestern king of gore, appeared on the ancient island continent of Laramidia around 80 million years ago, when a rising inland sea divided the North American continent, according to a study published Wednesday in the online journal PLOS One. That's a much...
OPINION
January 10, 2004
Re "Religion, Geology Collide at the Grand Canyon," Jan. 7: Creation science books make fascinating reading. Did you know that the sedimentary rock layers visible in the Grand Canyon were laid down by the Old Testament flood at the same time as the flood cut through them to form it? Amazing. Another interesting thing is that the vast amounts of water (many times the volume of all the oceans put together) required to cover the entire Earth to a depth of over five miles above the current sea level came from titanic caverns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1994 | Researched by JULIE SHEER / Los Angeles Times
Craggy or rounded, green or purple, the mountains that ring the San Fernando Valley have many faces. Although their geologic histories are similar, the Santa Susanas and the Santa Monicas are youngsters compared to the granddaddy of our mountains, the San Gabriels. Before there was a San Fernando Valley, seas covered the area and dried up, leaving sediment that turned into rock. Underwater volcanoes erupted to the west, spewing lava.
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