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Sedona

NATIONAL
June 21, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A 1,500-acre wildfire moved downhill Tuesday and threatened homes at the bottom of northern Arizona's scenic Oak Creek Canyon. The flames were less than half a mile from the highway at the canyon bottom, and power to homes and businesses was being shut down, said Katherine Sanchez Meador, a fire information officer with the Coconino National Forest.
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TRAVEL
December 8, 1991 | JUDITH MORGAN
Half-price Hathaway shirts are, perhaps, not reason enough to pack up and head for Sedona in the red-rock heart of Arizona. But a bargain is a bargain, and as long as you're there anyway. . . . Which I was recently for four crisp days. The Hathaway factory outlet on Highway 89-A also sells marked-down labels of Christian Dior and Ralph Lauren--from pleated tuxedo shirts to rugged denims and flannels. Each week has specials: silk ties for $6.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2002 | From Reuters
Kia Motors Corp.'s Sedona minivan suffered more than $4,000 in damage during a low-speed bumper crash test because its air bags deployed, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety said Wednesday. The Sedona had a total of $9,747 in damage in four crash tests, a performance the insurance industry-sponsored group rated "poor." The insurance institute said the air bags went off when the Sedona's front end was crashed into a flat barrier at 5 mph.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1996 | DON SHIRLEY
"Sedona, Arizona, 1595" is the fanciful setting for Colin Cox's staging of Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at LATC's Tom Bradley Theatre. "Midsummer" dates from around 1595, though Sedona didn't exist then. Cox and his Will & Company troupe pretend that Sedona (actually founded in 1902) was a Spanish colonial town. When the Sedonans venture into the countryside, they mingle with Native American spirits instead of conventional fairies.
TRAVEL
December 3, 1989 | JUDITH MORGAN, Morgan, the author of "California" (with photographer DeWitt Jones), is a La Jolla travel writer
In 1902, the U.S. Postmaster General made what to me seems a landmark decision: He rejected the name that was proposed for a new post office in Arizona Territory near the entrance to Oak Creek Canyon. Had he been less bold I might be writing today about an awesome place of mammoth red rocks and sun-bleached pinnacles--a place called Schnebly Station. You can't blame T. Carl Schnebly. He and his bride had come west from Missouri, where he was a hardware dealer.
BUSINESS
April 17, 2006 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
In the latest crash tests by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, South Korean automaker Kia Motors Corp.'s redesigned 2006 Sedona minivan achieved the best score the group has ever awarded a minivan. With the institute's top rating of "good" for front-, side- and rear-impact crashes, the Sedona outscored even the popular Honda Odyssey and Toyota Sienna models, long the industry leaders in crash safety ratings. The nonprofit, Arlington, Va.
NEWS
October 17, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Arizona's red-rock country goes on sale for the holidays with a family-minded package from Hilton Sedona Resort & Spa. It includes a holiday meal and daily breakfast for four - and you can bring the dog too. The deal: Away for the Holidays waives the daily $18 resort fee and the $50 pet fee for guests who come to spend the holidays. The package also includes a Thanksgiving or Christmas buffet for two adults and two children. The hotel says the package price represents a 25% savings on room and the included extras.
TRAVEL
September 30, 2001 | LAURIE GOUGH, Laurie Gough is the author of "Kite Strings of the Southern Cross: A Woman's Travel Odyssey" (Travelers' Tales, 1999). She lives in Ontario, Canada
My first impression of Sedona was that this peculiar little Arizona town, halfway between Phoenix and the Grand Canyon, shouldn't be a town at all. With its towering red rock formations, hoodoos, buttes and spires rising out of the crimson earth into sapphire skies and its canyons and mountain forests of pinyon and juniper, Sedona is entirely too majestic for people to actually live there.
TRAVEL
April 12, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
When the day wanes out here, the red rocks get up to their tricks. Their hues deepen. Their shapes shift in the creeping shade. And once the sun falls from view, they harden into jagged silhouettes. Some of these rocks are half a mile high. It's a tough act to follow. But Sedona is trying. Eager to lure visitors for longer and to stand apart from Phoenix, Flagstaff and the Grand Canyon, Sedona is raising man-made attractions left and right.
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