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NEWS
August 8, 1990 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On See Lee's quilt, there are soldiers embroidered in black. The fighting men, bayonets raised, chase terrified people through a forest dotted with skeletons. Lower, in another part of her work, people cross a wide river on rubber rafts into a camp filled with bunkers. And lower still on the panel, they line up to board airplanes en route to a new world.
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SPORTS
January 6, 2010 | By David Wharton
The news took Malcolm Lee by surprise, his mouth dropping open. "For real?" he asked. The UCLA sophomore, informed by reporters that he was shifting to point guard for tonight's game at California, needed a moment to recover. "Wow," he said. "OK, let's get it going." Coach Ben Howland announced changes to the Bruins' starting lineup -- apparently before telling players -- at a Tuesday afternoon news conference. Regular point guard Jerime Anderson is out, benched for showing up late to see the trainer about a groin injury last weekend, Howland said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1995 | JONATHAN D. POLLACK, Jonathan D. Pollack is senior adviser for international policy at RAND.
Sino-American relations are in trouble. A succession of developments culminating in the Clinton Administration's granting of a visa to Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui, who arrived in the United States Wednesday, has imperiled political ties. Leaders in both Washington and Beijing seem unable or unwilling to slow, let alone prevent, the steady deterioration. With the vagaries of an American presidential campaign and the Chinese succession struggle looming, the near-term forecast for U.S.
SPORTS
April 4, 1997 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe Travis Lee is worth $10 million. The High Desert Mavericks' first baseman, signed by the Arizona Diamondbacks for a then-record bonus last fall, spoiled the JetHawks' season opener Thursday night by driving in the go-ahead run in the top of the ninth and making two outstanding defensive plays in the bottom half of the Lancaster JetHawks' 5-4 California League loss before a paid crowd of 4,119. "If you sign something like that you've got to try to back it up," Lee said.
SPORTS
April 4, 1997 | JEFF FLETCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe Travis Lee is worth $10 million. The High Desert Mavericks' first baseman, signed by the Arizona Diamondbacks for a then-record bonus last fall, spoiled the JetHawks' season opener Thursday night by driving in the go-ahead run in the top of the ninth and making two outstanding defensive plays in the bottom half of the Lancaster JetHawks' 5-4 California League loss before a paid crowd of 4,119. "If you sign something like that you've got to try to back it up," Lee said.
SPORTS
January 6, 2010 | By David Wharton
The news took Malcolm Lee by surprise, his mouth dropping open. "For real?" he asked. The UCLA sophomore, informed by reporters that he was shifting to point guard for tonight's game at California, needed a moment to recover. "Wow," he said. "OK, let's get it going." Coach Ben Howland announced changes to the Bruins' starting lineup -- apparently before telling players -- at a Tuesday afternoon news conference. Regular point guard Jerime Anderson is out, benched for showing up late to see the trainer about a groin injury last weekend, Howland said.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | ELSTON CARR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid applause, laughter, tears and rapt silence, 75 teen-agers from a South-Central church watched Spike Lee's epic movie "Malcolm X" during its opening weekend at the Baldwin Theater. Outside the theater and at a spaghetti dinner at the Faithful Central Baptist Church that evening, the young people shared their impressions. "The movie was straight in-your-face action," said Jemela Suttle, a 14-year-old at Washington Preparatory High School in South Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 22, 1999 | J.R. MOEHRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CHAPTER 1 / Mary Lee's Vision She hopes the ferry won't come, but if it does, she'll climb aboard. She'll tremble as she steps off the landing because she can't swim, and she can't forget the many times she's crossed this ugly brown river only to meet more ugliness on the other side. But fear has never beaten Mary Lee Bendolph, and no river can stop her.
BOOKS
November 28, 1993
I'm going out and get something. I don't know what. I don't care. Whatever's out there, I'm going to get it. Look in those shop windows at boxes and boxes of Reeboks and Nikes to make me fly through the air like Michael Jordan like Magic. While I'm up there, I see Spike Lee. Looks like he's flying too straight through the glass that separates me from the virtual reality I watch everyday on TV. I know the difference between what it is and what it isn't.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2008 | Chris Lee
Is Ben Lyons the most hated film critic in America? In the four months since the fresh-faced 27-year-old "movie dude" for the E! Entertainment Network was installed to co-host a revamped version of the venerable movie review program "At the Movies," he has gotten a resounding thumbs down from an angry mob of film bloggers, columnists, professional movie critics and fans of the show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1995 | JONATHAN D. POLLACK, Jonathan D. Pollack is senior adviser for international policy at RAND.
Sino-American relations are in trouble. A succession of developments culminating in the Clinton Administration's granting of a visa to Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui, who arrived in the United States Wednesday, has imperiled political ties. Leaders in both Washington and Beijing seem unable or unwilling to slow, let alone prevent, the steady deterioration. With the vagaries of an American presidential campaign and the Chinese succession struggle looming, the near-term forecast for U.S.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | ELSTON CARR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Amid applause, laughter, tears and rapt silence, 75 teen-agers from a South-Central church watched Spike Lee's epic movie "Malcolm X" during its opening weekend at the Baldwin Theater. Outside the theater and at a spaghetti dinner at the Faithful Central Baptist Church that evening, the young people shared their impressions. "The movie was straight in-your-face action," said Jemela Suttle, a 14-year-old at Washington Preparatory High School in South Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 8, 1990 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On See Lee's quilt, there are soldiers embroidered in black. The fighting men, bayonets raised, chase terrified people through a forest dotted with skeletons. Lower, in another part of her work, people cross a wide river on rubber rafts into a camp filled with bunkers. And lower still on the panel, they line up to board airplanes en route to a new world.
SPORTS
April 22, 1995
Thanks for getting my day off to a great start with your article "Smith Saves the Easy Way" (April 17). As one who grew up in the same Castor/Ringgold, La., area as Lee Smith did, and as one who returns there several times annually, it's great to see Lee wear the mantle of success so gracefully. His commitment to the Castor community has lifted the spirits of all its citizens and can serve as an example of all of us who have attained a degree of success. REGINALD A. POPE, Pastor Bethel Missionary Baptist Church of South Los Angeles
SPORTS
December 24, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
And for Christmas, Marqise Lee gives us his smile. It's a breathtaking smile, a constant glow both impish and welcoming, his mouth curling out and eyes lighting up into quite possibly the shiniest holiday ornament on the Los Angeles sports landscape. The smile is his gift. It is also his sword. “You know that guy in the movie 'Platoon' who keeps smiling and laughing even as they keep shooting him?” said Armando Flores, one of Lee's former foster parents. “That's Marqise.” TIMELINE: College football 2012-13 bowl schedule The smile has come to symbolize the jaw-dropping football feats of this USC sophomore, who was voted the nation's best wide receiver while becoming a favorite for next year's Heisman Trophy.
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