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BUSINESS
December 28, 1986 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
The strains of a Mexican pop tune wafted from a radio mounted on the planting rig being towed by a tractor across the farm field. Dragged behind on runners mounted with bucket seats sat a crew of eight planters, trays of cauliflower seedlings on their laps. As the odd assemblage moved along, the planters dropped seedlings into eight moistened holes punched into the rows by jets of water.
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OPINION
April 12, 2012
From the start, there were indications that the U.S. Forest Service didn't respond aggressively enough during the 2009 Station fire in the Angeles National Forest. Now there are signs that it moved too aggressively to plant a million seedlings in an attempt at post-fire reforestation. As Times staff writer Louis Sahagun reports, only about a fourth of the pine and fir seedlings have survived so far, less than a third of the hoped-for number. Dry conditions this year would have made things difficult in any event, but many mistakes were surprisingly avoidable: planting in areas that experts now agree are too steep and rocky for tree survival; planting species that either aren't native to the area or weren't growing in those specific areas before; planting at too low an elevation; and planting more trees than typically grow in these areas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Federal forester Steve Bear stood on a fire-stripped slope of the San Gabriel Mountains last week, trying to find just one pine sapling, any sapling, pushing through the bright green bedspread of vegetation. It would give him hope after a year of disappointment. Last April, U.S. Forest Service crews planted nearly a million pine and fir trees to try to reclaim land scorched clean by the devastating Station fire. Most of them shriveled up and died within months, as skeptics had predicted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Federal forester Steve Bear stood on a fire-stripped slope of the San Gabriel Mountains last week, trying to find just one pine sapling, any sapling, pushing through the bright green bedspread of vegetation. It would give him hope after a year of disappointment. Last April, U.S. Forest Service crews planted nearly a million pine and fir trees to try to reclaim land scorched clean by the devastating Station fire. Most of them shriveled up and died within months, as skeptics had predicted.
HOME & GARDEN
May 26, 2001 | From ASSOCIATED PRESS
Transplanting vegetable and flower seedlings used to be more traumatic than it is now. Cabbage, tomato and broccoli seedlings were pulled bare-root out of nursery beds and kept alive, if transplanting was delayed, with their roots merely wrapped in moist newspaper. These days, peat pots and plastic cell packs keep seedling roots intact and in soil. Yet attention still is needed to the details of transplanting.
OPINION
April 12, 2012
From the start, there were indications that the U.S. Forest Service didn't respond aggressively enough during the 2009 Station fire in the Angeles National Forest. Now there are signs that it moved too aggressively to plant a million seedlings in an attempt at post-fire reforestation. As Times staff writer Louis Sahagun reports, only about a fourth of the pine and fir seedlings have survived so far, less than a third of the hoped-for number. Dry conditions this year would have made things difficult in any event, but many mistakes were surprisingly avoidable: planting in areas that experts now agree are too steep and rocky for tree survival; planting species that either aren't native to the area or weren't growing in those specific areas before; planting at too low an elevation; and planting more trees than typically grow in these areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1986 | GORDON GRANT, Times Staff Writer
Seedlings, some only a couple of inches tall, are sprouting in parts of a rare forest of Tecate cypress trees in fenced-off wilderness canyons in the extreme northeast corner of Orange County. Shaped like perfect little Christmas trees, they are growing brave and straight and green in reddish soil that is little more than finely crushed rock. Cones and fragments of bark have been found at La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, indicating that they grew that far north about 30,000 years ago.
NEWS
February 7, 1991
Three Los Angeles County fire stations in Malibu and one in Topanga have begun distributing tree seedlings in a program designed to reduce soil erosion and conserve water, a spokesman for Supervisor Mike Antonovich said. The program, which involves about two dozen fire stations countywide, is part of an effort by the county to combat drought conditions by reducing soil erosion and developing wind breaks, spokesman Dawson Oppenheimer said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1988
Los Angeles city officials have announced a Christmas tree recycling program that will offer participants a free seedling when they take their trees to a recycling center after the holidays. Residents can take their withering Christmas trees to seven centers that will operate throughout the city from Dec. 31 to Jan. 7. The trees will be taken to the Lopez Canyon landfill, turned into mulch and spread at parks and roadways to protect soil and conserve water, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1996 | FRANK MANNING
A wilderness preservation organization has begun planting oak seedlings near Malibu Creek State Park in an ongoing effort to help preserve the region's oak trees. About 35 coast live oak and valley oak seedlings have been planted over the past month along a trail leading from the park to a new park under construction in Calabasas, said Jo Kitz, program director for Mountains Restoration Trust.
HOME & GARDEN
July 17, 2010 | Chris Erskine
On a warm July day ... We plant flowers. You'd have a better chance of growing begonias in your bellybutton than in this particular flower bed out back. I call it Four-Mile Island because it's a disaster zone like Three-Mile Island, except 33% worse. Over the years, I have spent hundreds of dollars in soil enhancers, faith healers and exorcisms, with very mixed results. The only thing that grows on Four-Mile Island is despair. "We can help your marriage," an exorcist once told me, "but we can't help that awful piece of soil."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2010 | By Esmeralda Bermudez
If Richard Sheffield's idea takes root, the trees will be planted everywhere: the parks of California, golf courses in Colorado, school lawns in New Jersey . . . He envisions an army of firs, maples, dogwoods and pines all across the United States -- one tree for every American veteran who ever served. How many are we talking? "I have no idea," said Sheffield, an Air Force veteran who works as a landscaper and nursery owner. "There must be millions, but we're ready." On Saturday morning, Sheffield's dream began to take shape as members of the nonprofit Veterans for Trees held their first tree-planting ceremony in the Kern County community of Frazier Park.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2007 | Elizabeth Douglass, Times Staff Writer
Near a cluster of purple petunias in a Thousand Oaks greenhouse sprouts a key weapon in the nation's ambitious push into biofuels. The plants don't look like much. They're just tall, spiky shoots of prairie grass. But these stalks are souped-up samples of switch grass, part of an urgent drive toward a new kind of ethanol using plant fibers instead of corn kernels or sugar cane. Ceres Inc.
HOME & GARDEN
October 5, 2006 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
YOU know that you are a California gardener when the chief attraction of summer is that it is a prelude to autumn. Unlike the East, where leaf fall is followed by frost, here in the West, the third season of the year is a time to plant. It is the all-too-brief interval when the soil is still warm, the atmosphere is becoming moist, and the intense downpours of winter are still a month or two away. Autumn is the time to get many of our best seeds, seedlings, bulbs and saplings into the ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2003 | Hector Becerra, Times Staff Writer
The trees chopped down and dragged off the hill at Occidental College last week meant more to 81-year-old Scott Wilson than the nicely framed sunsets or shaded strolls they provided. The 65 oaks and sycamores were among hundreds planted on the Eagle Rock campus 13 years ago as the first effort by North East Trees, which the landscape architect founded to beautify diverse pockets of northeast Los Angeles.
NATIONAL
August 20, 2003 | From Associated Press
Two spiky green pine seedlings, the offspring of one of the oldest trees on Earth, were presented to the U.S. Botanic Garden on Tuesday as part of an effort to study and eventually clone the world's great trees. The 10-month-old seedlings, each about 4 inches high, were delivered to the Botanic Garden by northern Michigan tree farmer David Milarch and his son Jared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1990 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officials of the Angeles National Forest gave away about 2,800 cedar and pine seedlings to anyone willing to care for them Sunday to prevent the infant trees from falling victim to the region's continuing drought. The foot-tall trees were supposed to be planted last winter as part of the forest's annual reforestation program. But officials in the area's Tujunga District said they stopped the planting because of drier-than-normal soil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2003 | Lee Romney, Times Staff Writer
A nonprofit tree cloning organization has failed to create an exact genetic replica of the oldest known tree on Earth -- a bristlecone pine dubbed Methuselah that clings to arid soil in California's White Mountains. But the group managed to coax a crop of seedlings from the ancient tree's cones in what the group's co-founder calls a partial victory. Because the 2-inch sprouts grew from seeds, they also contain genetic material of another parent tree.
NEWS
September 7, 2001 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Israel's most venerated state-building agencies has come under attack from environmentalists, who say the organization's massive tree-planting efforts have actually harmed the very land it meant to reclaim. The Zionist Congress created the Jewish National Fund in 1901 with a mandate to buy land in what was then Palestine as the first step toward creating the Jewish state. Few organizations played a greater role in building Israel or hold a more powerful appeal for Jews around the world.
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