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Seeds

OPINION
February 19, 2013 | By George Kimbrell and Debbie Barker
On Tuesday, attorneys for the largest agrochemical corporation in the world, Monsanto, will present arguments before the Supreme Court asserting the company's rights to the generations of seeds that naturally reproduce from its genetically modified strains. Bowman vs. Monsanto Co. will be decided based on the court's interpretation of a complex web of seed and plant patent law, but the case also reflects something much more basic: Should anyone, or any corporation, control a product of life?
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SPORTS
March 20, 2001
Schools seeded ninth or lower in the NCAA basketball tournament that have advanced to the regional semifinals since 1979 when the NCAA began seeding all teams: *--* 1979 Pennsylvania (9**), St. John's (10*) 1980 Lamar (10) 1981 St.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court gave a victory to Monsanto and other makers of patented seeds Monday, ruling they can prohibit farmers from growing a second crop from their genetically engineered seeds. In a unanimous decision, the court said the patent for a specialized seed outlives the first planting. Otherwise, these seed patents would be “largely worthless,” said Justice Elena Kagan in explaining the decision. Agri-business giants like Monsanto will be relieved by the ruling.
BUSINESS
November 3, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
The road to a clean biofuels future is not easily traveled. Ceres Inc. in Thousand Oaks has some highly regarded science on its side as a producer of genetically modified seeds for crops used to make biofuels. Under the motto "Growing tomorrow's fuel today," Ceres has used advanced plant breeding and biotechnology to make better seeds for sophisticated versions of crops such as sweet sorghum, high-biomass sorghum, switch grass and miscanthus. Started in 1997 by a UCLA professor and his corporate partners with more than $50 million in private capital, Ceres makes seeds that can be converted into a new kind of ethanol using plant fibers instead of corn kernels or sugar cane.
NEWS
October 2, 2012 | By Jeff Spurrier
When it comes to drought-tolerant, fast-growing shade trees, few are as useful as the ice cream bean tree, Inga edulis (and its 300-plus related species). Although it grows like a tree, the ice cream bean actually is a legume. It can grow 60 feet or longer, and after four years in the ground it starts putting out foot-long pods packed with lima bean-size seeds swaddled in an edible, sweet, cottony covering. "When we went hunting in [El] Salvador and we are thirsty, we eat it," said Manuel Cisneros, the agricultural project coordinator at the Growing Experience, an urban farm at the Carmelitos housing development in Long Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2008 | From City News Service
Singer Barbra Streisand has donated $5 million to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in L.A. for a new women's heart center, hospital officials said Wednesday. Among other things, the Barbra Streisand Women's Cardiovascular Research and Education Program will expand research about female cardiovascular disease and raise awareness about it in the community, according to a statement released by Cedars-Sinai.
NEWS
March 7, 1987 | PENNY PAGANO, Times Staff Writer
Tucked in cramped offices in the nation's capital, a fertile ground for flowering political careers, are some most unusual green thumbs. Last year alone, these modern-day Johnny Appleseeds helped to scatter 2.5 tons of seeds that produced $7 million worth of food. And they were planted in all 50 states as part of 6,000 projects for groups ranging from a convent in Santa Barbara to a soup kitchen in Brentwood, Long Island.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2010 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Baked A Novel Mark Haskell Smith Black Cat Press: 352 pp., $14 paper The first sentence of "Baked," the new thriller by Mark Haskell Smith, features a four-letter profanity. The second sentence goes: "He walked out of his house and into the white-light white heat of a bullet exploding out of a handgun…" — and the reader rests secure in the certainty that, whatever else it may or may not achieve, this narrative won't dither. Although "Baked" features odes to the virtues and variety of marijuana and not just murder and mayhem, its effect is rarely mellow.
FOOD
February 26, 2003
When my husband and I moved into our new home in the East Bay in 1984, we built raised beds for our first vegetable garden. We ordered seeds from Renee Shepherd's catalog ("Seeds: A Starter Set for Epicures," Feb. 12), which made us even more enthusiastic about gardening because it was beautifully illustrated and packed with information and good recipes. After the seeds were planted, our seedlings were promptly eaten by garden pests. I wrote to Renee for pest control advice, and she took the time to send me a handwritten note with recommendations for safely ridding the garden of certain pests.
SCIENCE
June 24, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Norway on Monday began construction of an Arctic seed bank that is intended to be a "Noah's Ark" of global crop samples, protecting them from extinction. The $4.8-million vault near Longyearbyen on the island of Svalbard, in the Arctic Circle, will hold as many as 3 million types of seeds from all over the world, according to the Norwegian Agriculture and Food Ministry. The bank is scheduled to open in September 2007.
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