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BUSINESS
October 23, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
One in a series of occasional reports about the U.S. unemployment crisis. A weak labor market is hurting the U.S. recovery, but it's been lucrative for scammers, who are bilking unemployed workers out of millions of dollars in fees to steer clients to jobs that never materialize, watchdogs say. Many of these schemes have been around for years, promising people who send money a chance to work as bartenders, home inspectors or "secret shoppers"...
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NEWS
February 7, 2014 | By Jon Healey
The disappointing January jobs report -- only 113,000 positions added, compared to 194,000 per month on average last year -- has generated much hand-wringing by policymakers, pundits and economists. Januaries are typically slow months for job growth , as employers shed a bunch of temporary workers hired for the holidays, yet last month's total still came in well short of analysts' expectations. And given that December's jobs report was even worse than January's , with a net gain of only 75,000 jobs (revised upward from the original 74,000)
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OPINION
April 2, 2012
The Obama administration is stubbornly defending a policy that treats immigrants who are fleeing persecution unequally, resting its decisions on where immigrants initially sought asylum rather than on the merits of their cases. It should yield to the recommendations of immigrant and human rights groups and adopt a more consistent set of rules. About 41,000 immigrants applied to immigration courts for asylum last year, according to federal statistics. Those who sought protection at the borders or airports were immediately held until immigration officials released them or immigration judges granted asylum.
NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is changing the rules for refugees and asylum seekers in the United States so that people will no longer be barred entry for providing incidental or unintentional support to terrorist organizations. The new definition of what it means to provide “material support” to terrorists comes after years of complaints from human rights advocates that the old rules led to the exclusion of vulnerable refugees who pose no harm. Among those turned away in recent months were a Syrian refugee who paid an opposition group to gain safe passage out of Syria and a farmer who paid tolls to a resistance group to cross a bridge to take his food to market, according to the Department of Homeland Security.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2013 | By Shan Li
Behaving like Scrooge is typically not the best way to win points with a date. But a new study concludes that many love seekers think savers are actually more attractive than spenders. Savers are viewed as having higher powers of self-control than their free-spending peers. That kind of discipline can extend into other areas as well, making life more pleasant for potential mates, the study said. For example, savers may also be more careful about exercising and watching their nutrition.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The unemployment rate rose in January, while job cuts soared as much as 39% year over year, according to three separate reports Thursday. But don't panic -- Experts say the new data is not only expected, but possibly even promising. Gallup said that joblessness rose to 8.6% from 8.5% in December. But the polling group added that the figure is down significantly from the 9.9% recorded for January last year and the 10.9% rate from the same month in 2010. The percentage of people working part-time but hoping for full-time work spiked to 10.1% from 9.8% in December, reaching its highest level since Gallup began keeping track of the measure at the beginning of 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Cindy Chang and Kate Linthicum
He was 10 when the gangsters flung rocks through the windows, and 12 when they beat him black and blue. At 15, a gang member shot at him while he was shopping at a grocery store - and killed his cousin instead. At 17, he left Honduras for the United States. He applied for political asylum, telling a judge that if he returned home, the gang that had slain his father would kill him, too. Now 20, working as a gardener and living with his mother and siblings in Los Angeles, the man is one of a growing number of Central Americans asking for asylum.
OPINION
January 9, 2002
Your two-part series on refugees trying to enter Australia, by Richard Paddock, was excellent for its detail and bringing to the attention of the rest of the world our appalling treatment of these people (Jan. 4-5). Australians pride themselves on their tolerance, easygoing nature and giving everyone what they call a "fair go." Unfortunately it is all a myth. Aussies are just as racist as any other nationality but have difficulty accepting it. Our federal election last November was race-based, where both the major political parties tried to outdo each other by being tough on refugees trying to get to Australia.
NATIONAL
October 28, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
EL PASO - One of his clients, a Mexican waitress and widowed mother of three, says she played dead under a pile of bodies to survive a massacre in Ciudad Juarez led by men she recognized as federal police. Another client says Chihuahua state police hacked off his feet after he refused to pay them bribes. They came to El Paso seeking Carlos Spector, 58, a burly, hard-charging immigration attorney who has developed a strange specialty in this Texas border city. His clients, instead of crossing into the United States illegally and hiding out, are seeking asylum.
REAL ESTATE
December 4, 1988
Monster mansions, fancy restaurants with prices to match, overeating "pig-outs" and promenading by those who are affluent but greedy seekers of publicity have been sickening to those of us who must live on our small incomes. They don't seem to care about the elderly, the ill, the disabled and homeless children. ANN W. BRODFUEHRER Ramona
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Cindy Chang and Kate Linthicum
He was 10 when the gangsters flung rocks through the windows, and 12 when they beat him black and blue. At 15, a gang member shot at him while he was shopping at a grocery store - and killed his cousin instead. At 17, he left Honduras for the United States. He applied for political asylum, telling a judge that if he returned home, the gang that had slain his father would kill him, too. Now 20, working as a gardener and living with his mother and siblings in Los Angeles, the man is one of a growing number of Central Americans asking for asylum.
WORLD
September 16, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Israel's Supreme Court on Monday tossed out a controversial law that allowed police to jail refugees and undocumented migrants for up to three years without trial, a key part of the government's recent crackdown against mostly African asylum seekers who had been flooding into the country. A panel of nine High Court judges ruled unanimously that the Law for Prevention of Infiltration -- which took effect in 2012 -- violated human rights. An estimated 2,000 asylum seekers, mostly from Eritrea and other African nations, are believed to be in Israeli detention facilities.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - It was two steps forward, one step back last month for the sluggish labor market. A modest net gain of 169,000 jobs in August combined with a large downward revision for the previous two months to raise new doubts about whether the economy is strong enough for the Federal Reserve to start dialing back one of its key efforts to boost growth. Although the unemployment rate ticked down to 7.3% last month - the lowest level since December 2008 - it fell largely for the wrong reason.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2013 | By Shan Li
The top fear of people on job interviews is not showing up late or blanking out on important facts. The greatest worry plaguing job seekers, according to one survey, is appearing too nervous. About 17% of Americans fear that they look and act too jittery during interviews, according to a poll by Harris Interactive. That is followed by worries about appearing too qualified (15%) and not knowing how to answer a question (15%). Other interview nightmares include showing up late (14%)
BUSINESS
August 20, 2013 | By Shan Li
Behaving like Scrooge is typically not the best way to win points with a date. But a new study concludes that many love seekers think savers are actually more attractive than spenders. Savers are viewed as having higher powers of self-control than their free-spending peers. That kind of discipline can extend into other areas as well, making life more pleasant for potential mates, the study said. For example, savers may also be more careful about exercising and watching their nutrition.
TRAVEL
August 18, 2013 | By Mike Morris
- There's really no better way to see a place than by foot. Even if the path is 26.2 miles and goes over a 13,800-foot mountain pass. And it's a race. Running a marathon in June along the Inca Trail, high in the Peruvian Andes, seemed like a good idea when I signed up for this trip nine months earlier. Although this marathon left me gasping - because of the scenery, I'm sure - it was worth it once I reached the Sun Gate and viewed the finish line - the spectacular ruins of Machu Picchu - a short distance below.
NEWS
June 15, 2004
"Brand Bethany" (June 1) was mean and misguided. Surfer Bethany Hamilton and her family aren't publicity seekers. I've met them. People should look at the message Bethany has managed to get out through all the publicity: Even with a disability, she can still have fun and compete and be inspirational. This is an important message to send to any teenager. Wendy Ledner Hollywood
NEWS
June 15, 1989 | From United Press International
Main provisions of "boat people" plan adopted by delegates from 70 countries to International Conference on Indochinese Refugees in Geneva: Status of asylum-seekers to be determined as quickly as possible by "qualified and competent national authority;" right of appeal in case of rejection, and governments to observe "need to respect the family unit." "Temporary refuge will be given to all asylum-seekers, who will be treated identically regardless of their mode of arrival until the status determination process is completed."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2013 | By Bob Pool
Jonathan Knight doesn't blame government cutbacks for forcing him to stand near a freeway ramp holding a "Please Take a Resume" sign. The young man aiming for a career as a legislative analyst realizes it's the tight economy that is making it difficult for recent college graduates to launch their careers. So Knight, who once interned with a U.S. senator in Washington, D.C., puts on a shirt and tie, grabs a sign that lists his qualifications and stands on street corners hoping passing motorists will slow down and grab one of his resumes.
WORLD
July 15, 2013 | By Edmund Sanders
JERUSALEM -- Israel quietly returned 14 Eritrean refugees back to their restive African country and is planning to send home as many as 200 more in the coming days, refugee-rights groups said Monday. Israeli officials declined to comment directly on the 14 cases Monday, but the Interior Ministry said in a statement that all refugees who are repatriated have signed voluntary consent forms and agreed to go home. Activists for the refugees say the practice may not be legal because refugees appear to have been threatened and pressured, according to Reut Michaeli, executive director of the Tel Aviv-based Hotline for Migrant Workers.
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