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Sega Enterprises Ltd

BUSINESS
April 15, 1993 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A cable TV channel devoted solely to video games will be launched early next year under a partnership teaming video game manufacturer Sega Enterprises, entertainment conglomerate Time Warner Inc. and cable giant Tele-Communications Inc. The Sega Channel, as the venture is called, is the first in what is expected to be several new cable TV channels employing interactive technology. That technology allows viewers to instantly select the programs and movies they want to watch.
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BUSINESS
July 16, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Video game giant Sega Enterprises, struggling in the face of intense competition from Sony and Nintendo, announced Monday that the head of its U.S. unit, Tom Kalinske, will leave the company as part of a sweeping management shake-up. Kalinske, a well-known figure in the video game business, will take a job Oct. 1 as head of Education Technology LLC, a Los Angeles-based start-up formed in March by Oracle Corp. Chairman and Chief Executive Larry Ellison and former junk bond king Michael Milken.
BUSINESS
January 4, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm in the second dungeon of (The Legend of Zelda) Links Awakening," says a young man putting a call into the game counseling center at Nintendo's U.S. headquarters here. "I've just had the dog eat the flowers so I could get in the dungeon. But I've used up my keys, so I can't get in the next one."
BUSINESS
December 4, 2002 | Alex Pham
Sega Corp. launched an online service for game developers that would compete with GameSpy Industries in Irvine. The Sega service provides developers with Web hosting, player matching and billing capabilities. As consoles acquire the ability to connect to the Internet, developers increasingly are building into their games online features such as finding opponents, competing in tournaments and downloading content.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The $7-billion battle to control digital entertainment escalates today at the Los Angeles Convention Center, where Microsoft Corp. and the world's leading video game companies will square off and spend tens of millions of dollars trying to outshoot one another. Their goal, and the crux of this fierce rivalry, is to dominate a new generation of video game machines.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sega's back. After jettisoning its financially disastrous Dreamcast game console, Sega Corp. is plotting its return as a software company by teaming up with its former archrival, Nintendo Co. In a deal to be announced today, Sega will make 10 games for Nintendo's upcoming Gamecube console, including a title that will feature Sega's mascot, Sonic the Hedgehog. The significance is symbolic.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2003 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Sega Corp.'s president said the Japanese video game company is discussing a joint venture with rival Electronic Arts Inc. to distribute games in North America. "We will consider forming a sales joint venture in the United States if necessary," Sega's new president, Hisao Oguchi, told Reuters on Tuesday in Tokyo. He said Sega was weighing a proposal by Redwood City, Calif.-based EA, but did not elaborate. EA, maker of the popular "Madden" series, did not reply to requests for comment.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2000 | Times Staff
Nintendo, the Japanese video game systems company that popularized arcade-style games at home, is in talks to buy Sega, the beleaguered video game maker that revolutionized the industry in the early 1990s with its fanciful characters and eye-popping virtual worlds, the New York Times reported in today's edition.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1994 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times
Sonic the Hedgehog doesn't have to worry much about becoming road kill on Japan's information superhighway: Sega won't even let him on. Nintendo's Street Fighters--whose high-bandwidth blood lust makes even Japan's most violent manga comics seem mild--aren't I-way cruising for a bruising either. We won't even talk about Super Mario. . . .
BUSINESS
December 4, 2000 | DAVE WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The launch of Sony's PlayStation 2 video game console this fall was supposed to nuke rival Sega's Dreamcast machine, but production fumbles by Sony and radical promotions by Sega have catapulted Dreamcast back into the game. And none too soon. With Nintendo and Microsoft poised to deliver fancy new consoles late next year, Sega and its year-old Dreamcast had seemed doomed to die quietly as industry leader Sony jostled to stay ahead.
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