Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSega Enterprises Ltd
IN THE NEWS

Sega Enterprises Ltd

BUSINESS
December 4, 2002 | Alex Pham
Sega Corp. launched an online service for game developers that would compete with GameSpy Industries in Irvine. The Sega service provides developers with Web hosting, player matching and billing capabilities. As consoles acquire the ability to connect to the Internet, developers increasingly are building into their games online features such as finding opponents, competing in tournaments and downloading content.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 11, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The $7-billion battle to control digital entertainment escalates today at the Los Angeles Convention Center, where Microsoft Corp. and the world's leading video game companies will square off and spend tens of millions of dollars trying to outshoot one another. Their goal, and the crux of this fierce rivalry, is to dominate a new generation of video game machines.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sega's back. After jettisoning its financially disastrous Dreamcast game console, Sega Corp. is plotting its return as a software company by teaming up with its former archrival, Nintendo Co. In a deal to be announced today, Sega will make 10 games for Nintendo's upcoming Gamecube console, including a title that will feature Sega's mascot, Sonic the Hedgehog. The significance is symbolic.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2003 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Sega Corp.'s president said the Japanese video game company is discussing a joint venture with rival Electronic Arts Inc. to distribute games in North America. "We will consider forming a sales joint venture in the United States if necessary," Sega's new president, Hisao Oguchi, told Reuters on Tuesday in Tokyo. He said Sega was weighing a proposal by Redwood City, Calif.-based EA, but did not elaborate. EA, maker of the popular "Madden" series, did not reply to requests for comment.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1994 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE, Michael Schrage is a writer, consultant and research associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He writes this column independently for The Times
Sonic the Hedgehog doesn't have to worry much about becoming road kill on Japan's information superhighway: Sega won't even let him on. Nintendo's Street Fighters--whose high-bandwidth blood lust makes even Japan's most violent manga comics seem mild--aren't I-way cruising for a bruising either. We won't even talk about Super Mario. . . .
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, the makers of home video game consoles have chased the elusive dream of online play--using the Internet to not only connect far-flung players but deliver a giant menu of interactive entertainment. Going online means being able to challenge opponents from across the world, not just across the living room. It means being able to download new levels, characters, weapons, outfits, missions and arenas for existing games. And it means a regular diet of new, "episodic" games and upgrades.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2003 | From Associated Press
Sammy Corp., a major Japanese pachinko pinball-machine maker, said Monday it plans to buy a 22.4% stake in Sega Corp. to become the largest shareholder in the video game software maker. The announcement comes after talks between Sega and Sammy over a possible tie-up fell through in May. Similar talks between Sega and rival game maker Namco also broke down in May. Sammy will spend $419 million to buy the stake from CSK Corp.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2004 | From Associated Press
Sega Corp., the video game maker famous for Sonic the Hedgehog, and pinball equipment maker Sammy Corp. said Tuesday that they would integrate their operations under a new holding company that would become Japan's biggest video game software company. Sega and Tokyo-based Sammy will form the new company by Oct. 1. It will be 72% controlled by current Sammy shareholders, the companies said. Their combined group annual sales are about $3.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1996 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What Volkswagen did for cars, Sega wants to do for the Internet. With this month's release of its $200 Internet box called Net Link, the video game giant is betting big that thumb-sore kids and parents tired of twitch-and-flinch games want to slow down and cruise the World Wide Web from their sofas. Sega executives hope Net Link's 28.8-kilobit-per-second modem and custom interface will lure enough buyers to prop up lackluster sales of the company's flagship 32-bit game machine, Saturn.
NEWS
October 25, 2001 | Alex Pham
Sega Corp. will begin charging $9.95 a month beginning Nov. 1 for access to SegaNet, its online gaming service for players of Dreamcast, Sega's discontinued video game console. Launched last year as a $100-million bet on online games, SegaNet initially charged players $21.95 a month for dial-up Internet service as well as access to its online game site. The company discontinued that two months ago and let players access SegaNet games for free as long as they have their own Internet connection.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|