Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSega Of America Inc
IN THE NEWS

Sega Of America Inc

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sega, MGM to Collaborate on Products: Executives said the two companies will team up to make video games, movies and television programs in a deal that will strengthen the partnership of entertainment and technology. The agreement combines Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc.'s expertise in story development and its access to acting and directing talent with the technical and game-playing savvy of Sega of America Inc. Redwood City, Calif.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 18, 2003 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
A pair of high-level resignations in the video game industry Friday signaled that the fiercely competitive $20-billion global business appears headed for a shakeout just weeks after finishing its best year ever. San Francisco-based Sega of America Inc.'s president and chief operating officer, Peter Moore, stepped down abruptly Friday and was replaced by Tetsu Kayama, chief operating officer and director of the Tokyo parent company, Sega Corp. A few hours earlier, Acclaim Entertainment Inc.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sega Advertising Account Awarded: The announcement that Goodby Berlin & Silverstein of San Francisco won the contract came after two months of extensive review that included incumbents Bozell Inc. and Della Femina McNamee of Los Angeles. "We have every intention of winning the video game battle this fall," said Edward Volkwein, senior vice president of Sega. Sega of America Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of $1.6-billion Sega Enterprises Ltd., Japan.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2002 | Alex Pham
The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed suit against Sega of America Inc. and Spherion Corp., alleging the companies fired 12 Filipino workers because of their national origin. The workers were employed by Spherion, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based temporary employment agency, but worked at Sega's San Francisco offices to test video games, the EEOC said.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1999
Sega of America Inc. replaced its president, Bernard Solar, just as the video game maker is about to launch its high-powered Dreamcast game system, designed to revive flagging sales. Sega did not say whether Solar, who has been a marketing force for Dreamcast, was fired or resigned Wednesday. Toshiro Kezuka, who joined the company this year as deputy chairman, was named vice chairman and chief operating officer to replace Solar.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, technology reporter
The gauntlet has officially been thrown down in the game-console war between Sony Corp. and Sega of America Inc. At this week's Game Developer's Conference in San Jose, Sega demonstrated its next-generation system, Dreamcast, and hinted that it's left Sony quaking. Said Sega President Bernie Stolar: "We're dreaming big and delivering big." Yet analysts at the show say the reverse is true. Today Sony will show the technology behind its long-awaited PlayStation II, due in late 2000.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2002 | Alex Pham
The federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed suit against Sega of America Inc. and Spherion Corp., alleging the companies fired 12 Filipino workers because of their national origin. The workers were employed by Spherion, a Fort Lauderdale, Fla.-based temporary employment agency, but worked at Sega's San Francisco offices to test video games, the EEOC said.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sega of America Inc. pulled the plug Friday on an ambitious strategy to link video game consoles to the Internet, saying it will focus solely on producing software titles. The abandonment of SegaNet is Sega's second major retreat of the year. In February, the once-dominant console maker announced it would no longer produce its Dreamcast machine after losing more than $500 million in two years.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2003 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
A pair of high-level resignations in the video game industry Friday signaled that the fiercely competitive $20-billion global business appears headed for a shakeout just weeks after finishing its best year ever. San Francisco-based Sega of America Inc.'s president and chief operating officer, Peter Moore, stepped down abruptly Friday and was replaced by Tetsu Kayama, chief operating officer and director of the Tokyo parent company, Sega Corp. A few hours earlier, Acclaim Entertainment Inc.
BUSINESS
August 1, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video game publishing companies seem more like movie studios these days. They employ camera operators, producers, sound experts, artists and production crews. Creativity, glamour and adventure brew in every corporate cubicle. They tap the talents of computer cowboys--programmers, three-dimensional animators and well-paid joystick jockeys who "analyze" games in front of a screen all day.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sega Corp. and THQ Inc. agreed to jointly release 16 titles in North America during the next two years for Nintendo Co.'s Game Boy Advance hand-held video game player. Sega, which in February discontinued its Dreamcast console after losing hundreds of millions of dollars, has been searching for ways to ramp up its titles on other consoles. It already has announced that it will publish its games on Sony Corp.'s PlayStation 2, Microsoft Corp.'
BUSINESS
July 21, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sega of America Inc. pulled the plug Friday on an ambitious strategy to link video game consoles to the Internet, saying it will focus solely on producing software titles. The abandonment of SegaNet is Sega's second major retreat of the year. In February, the once-dominant console maker announced it would no longer produce its Dreamcast machine after losing more than $500 million in two years.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Video game maker Sega of America on Thursday sued Kmart Corp. for allegedly refusing to pay a $2.2-million tab. The lawsuit, filed in Superior Court in San Francisco, claims Kmart failed to remit $2.2 million of a $25.9-million bill for Dreamcast video game consoles shipped since September 1999, when Sega launched the machine in North America.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2001 | Alex Pham
Sega of America laid off about one-third of the staff in its U.S. headquarters in San Francisco, capping off a tumultuous week in which the video game company announced plans to exit the console business and focus exclusively on developing software. The job cuts affect about 60 employees who support Sega's Dreamcast console. On Wednesday, Sega said it will cease to manufacture the Dreamcast on March 31 but will continue to make games for the machine for at least the next 12 months.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1999 | (A Times Staff Writer)
Sega's new Dreamcast video game system generated an estimated $111 million in retail sales in the U.S. during its first three days on sale, according to NPD Group Inc., a Port Washington, N.Y.-based market research firm. Dreamcast's surge pushed overall sales for the video game market up by 133% for the week ended Sept. 11, NPD said, with Sega Dreamcast accounting for 88% of the growth.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1999 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The big three video game makers are spending an amount about equal to Grenada's gross domestic product in their battle for supremacy over the fickle $6.3-billion video game business. The unprecedented marketing push is being fueled by Sega of America's introduction today of its much-anticipated Dreamcast, the most powerful video game console ever. Sega plans to spend $100 million promoting the machine, which analysts say represents the troubled company's last chance to succeed in the U.S.
BUSINESS
March 15, 1994 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no rest for the video game addict. Nor, apparently, for the feuding manufacturers Sega and Nintendo, who each announced new products Monday designed to improve the performance of their technology. Sega of America, whose Genesis machine sits atop the television sets of 13 million U.S.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, Nintendo was the virtually unchallenged king of the $3.5-billion American video game business. And the Kyoto-based firm ruled its market with an iron fist: demanding high licensing fees, restricting the number of software companies allowed to develop games for Nintendo machines and barring them from developing software for rivals. Its actions sparked numerous lawsuits from retailers and game developers, who charged unfair trade practices. Now the kingdom of Nintendo is under attack.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1999
Sega of America Inc. replaced its president, Bernard Solar, just as the video game maker is about to launch its high-powered Dreamcast game system, designed to revive flagging sales. Sega did not say whether Solar, who has been a marketing force for Dreamcast, was fired or resigned Wednesday. Toshiro Kezuka, who joined the company this year as deputy chairman, was named vice chairman and chief operating officer to replace Solar.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, technology reporter
The gauntlet has officially been thrown down in the game-console war between Sony Corp. and Sega of America Inc. At this week's Game Developer's Conference in San Jose, Sega demonstrated its next-generation system, Dreamcast, and hinted that it's left Sony quaking. Said Sega President Bernie Stolar: "We're dreaming big and delivering big." Yet analysts at the show say the reverse is true. Today Sony will show the technology behind its long-awaited PlayStation II, due in late 2000.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|