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Segerstrom Center For The Arts

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1998 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Segerstrom family on Tuesday formally announced it will donate $16 million worth of land for an expanded cultural complex in Costa Mesa to be called the Segerstrom Center for the Arts. The family has agreed in principle to contribute roughly 6 acres of former farmland for a complex that will complement the Orange County Performing Arts Center, said Henry T. Segerstrom.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2013 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
The sex lives of modern cities - Berlin in the 1920s, New York or San Francisco in the 1970s - tend to be characterized in terms of underground cabarets and over-the-top discos, of fast times fueled by carefree hedonism. But the sex life of the Belarusian capital of Minsk, as conceived by the Belarus Free Theatre, is about something less flashy and more fundamental. Human identity and freedom, as seen through the prism of sexuality, are the central concerns of "Minsk, 2011: A Reply to Kathy Acker," which will play Thursday through Saturday as part of the Off Center Festival of the Segerstrom Center for the Arts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Segerstrom family on Friday gave the county a Christmas present it promised a year ago. It announced it will transfer ownership of about six acres of former farmland--valued at $16 million--by the end of December for an expanded Costa Mesa cultural complex to be called Segerstrom Center for the Arts. "We are making the gift of land . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By Joseph Carman
NEW YORK - "Take your balancé from side to side, instead of just traveling backwards, to make it a broader move," instructs choreographer Doug Varone to two of his nimble female dancers as they perform a waltz-rhythmed step in unison. Dressed in well-worn sweat pants and draped T-shirts, Varone and his dancers are dissecting one of his latest dances, "Carrugi," at a rehearsal hall at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan, to extract the nuances of the choreography. Filled with Italianate gestures, fluidly arcing backs, light footfalls, rough-and-tumble tugging and human friezes that freeze movement like Bernini's marble sculptures, "Carrugi" spins a cyclone of choreographic images.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1998 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unless you count the Block--which throngs of movie-hounds might--late news about a one-time lima bean field eclipsed all other developments on the Orange County arts and entertainment scene this year. The Segerstrom family announced Dec. 15 that it would donate another six acres of erstwhile farmland beside the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa for the center's long-planned expansion.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By Christopher Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The arts world craves star power. Locally, we're covered. Opera? No problem — Plácido. Classical music? Dudamel. Dance? There's ... well, anyone there? Anyone at all? This s explains why perhaps the most important dance figure of the past quarter of a century in Southern California is largely unknown. She's not a dancer — in point of fact, she hasn't been en pointe in half a century. Instead, Judy Morr occupies a comfortably cluttered and modest office, basking happily in as little attention as she can possibly get, quietly programming dance, especially ballet, for as many people she can get to come see it. She is backed by worldwide contacts, an up-to-the-minute knowledge of hot versus not and, most important, the considerable resources of the Segerstrom Center for the Arts, which turns 25 this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2011 | Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
For its 25th anniversary, the Orange County Performing Arts Center is giving itself a new name: Segerstrom Center for the Arts. The change went into effect Wednesday with a late-afternoon ceremony on the center's plaza in Costa Mesa. The name honors the family that provided a home and support for Orange County's leading arts district by making periodic donations of land and money since 1974 that now total 14 acres and $75 million. "Segerstrom Center for the Arts" has been used since 1998 as a relatively low-profile name for the arts district, but it now also becomes the organizational name of its chief inhabitant.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
It's possible that in its previous 25 years the Segerstrom Center for the Arts had attracted a patron dressed in purple sneakers, glittery eye makeup, a lacy black skirt and vest, fingerless black gloves and a big white cloth floral-type pin in her hair, all recalling Cyndi Lauper, circa 1984. But then again, maybe not. "She texted me: 'Dress steampunk,'" explained 19-year-old Elaina Perpelitt, nodding toward Joni Renee, her 21-year-old friend who had turned up in a black dancer's leotard and a corona of red curly hair.
IMAGE
October 18, 2009 | Ellen Olivier
Will China dominate the cultural world in the 21st century? That's the prediction of Dean Corey, executive director of the Orange County Philharmonic Society, which is presenting Ancient Paths, Modern Voices: A Festival Celebrating Chinese Culture at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa. "The Olympics in China really woke us all up," Corey said. "The Chinese are a long way from being imitators; they are creators. This festival will make people aware of what will be happening in the future.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012 | By Debra Levine
Trey McIntyre recalls the time he played the Pied Piper of Orange County. The choreographer had brought his dance troupe and his dance, "The More I See You," to the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in 2009. "As I left the theater, I turned into a caricature of a choreographer. Someone handed me a cape, a glass of scotch, and a pair of greyhounds. The paparazzi hounded me. I transformed into a hard-boiled pulp-fiction guy. " Astonishingly, he remembers, "the audience followed. " Jump ahead to this weekend's return visit of Trey McIntyre Project, featuring the world premiere of "Ways of Seeing," a Segerstrom commission that also puts the audience into active mode.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012 | By Debra Levine
Trey McIntyre recalls the time he played the Pied Piper of Orange County. The choreographer had brought his dance troupe and his dance, "The More I See You," to the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in 2009. "As I left the theater, I turned into a caricature of a choreographer. Someone handed me a cape, a glass of scotch, and a pair of greyhounds. The paparazzi hounded me. I transformed into a hard-boiled pulp-fiction guy. " Astonishingly, he remembers, "the audience followed. " Jump ahead to this weekend's return visit of Trey McIntyre Project, featuring the world premiere of "Ways of Seeing," a Segerstrom commission that also puts the audience into active mode.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
It's possible that in its previous 25 years the Segerstrom Center for the Arts had attracted a patron dressed in purple sneakers, glittery eye makeup, a lacy black skirt and vest, fingerless black gloves and a big white cloth floral-type pin in her hair, all recalling Cyndi Lauper, circa 1984. But then again, maybe not. "She texted me: 'Dress steampunk,'" explained 19-year-old Elaina Perpelitt, nodding toward Joni Renee, her 21-year-old friend who had turned up in a black dancer's leotard and a corona of red curly hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2011 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On the cusp of her Broadway return, starring in the controversial re-imagined production of "Porgy and Bess" (renamed "The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess"), four-time Tony Award winner Audra McDonald, 41, comes to Orange County on Oct. 15 for a cabaret performance, midway through a two-month cross-country tour. Your Oct. 15 concert at Segerstrom Center is scheduled for a break between "The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess'" out-of-town and Broadway runs? Yes, we have a couple of months off. We start back up with previews Dec. 17. What can the audience look forward to?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By Christopher Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The arts world craves star power. Locally, we're covered. Opera? No problem — Plácido. Classical music? Dudamel. Dance? There's ... well, anyone there? Anyone at all? This s explains why perhaps the most important dance figure of the past quarter of a century in Southern California is largely unknown. She's not a dancer — in point of fact, she hasn't been en pointe in half a century. Instead, Judy Morr occupies a comfortably cluttered and modest office, basking happily in as little attention as she can possibly get, quietly programming dance, especially ballet, for as many people she can get to come see it. She is backed by worldwide contacts, an up-to-the-minute knowledge of hot versus not and, most important, the considerable resources of the Segerstrom Center for the Arts, which turns 25 this month.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The popular image of Franz Liszt is a demonic, wild-haired virtuoso, constantly on tour, playing an endless number of marathon shows in which women swooned and fought for his stray gloves. That image isn't new: Caricaturists in Liszt's day sometimes drew smoke coming off the piano as if the speed and force of his playing had led the instrument to spontaneously combust. He would sometimes break the wood-framed pianos he played. But this vision of Liszt as classical music's answer to Jimi Hendrix at his guitar-burning wildest doesn't tell the whole story of the man or his music, says Louis Lortie.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2011 | Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
For its 25th anniversary, the Orange County Performing Arts Center is giving itself a new name: Segerstrom Center for the Arts. The change went into effect Wednesday with a late-afternoon ceremony on the center's plaza in Costa Mesa. The name honors the family that provided a home and support for Orange County's leading arts district by making periodic donations of land and money since 1974 that now total 14 acres and $75 million. "Segerstrom Center for the Arts" has been used since 1998 as a relatively low-profile name for the arts district, but it now also becomes the organizational name of its chief inhabitant.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2013 | By Joseph Carman
NEW YORK - "Take your balancé from side to side, instead of just traveling backwards, to make it a broader move," instructs choreographer Doug Varone to two of his nimble female dancers as they perform a waltz-rhythmed step in unison. Dressed in well-worn sweat pants and draped T-shirts, Varone and his dancers are dissecting one of his latest dances, "Carrugi," at a rehearsal hall at the 92nd Street Y in Manhattan, to extract the nuances of the choreography. Filled with Italianate gestures, fluidly arcing backs, light footfalls, rough-and-tumble tugging and human friezes that freeze movement like Bernini's marble sculptures, "Carrugi" spins a cyclone of choreographic images.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The popular image of Franz Liszt is a demonic, wild-haired virtuoso, constantly on tour, playing an endless number of marathon shows in which women swooned and fought for his stray gloves. That image isn't new: Caricaturists in Liszt's day sometimes drew smoke coming off the piano as if the speed and force of his playing had led the instrument to spontaneously combust. He would sometimes break the wood-framed pianos he played. But this vision of Liszt as classical music's answer to Jimi Hendrix at his guitar-burning wildest doesn't tell the whole story of the man or his music, says Louis Lortie.
IMAGE
October 18, 2009 | Ellen Olivier
Will China dominate the cultural world in the 21st century? That's the prediction of Dean Corey, executive director of the Orange County Philharmonic Society, which is presenting Ancient Paths, Modern Voices: A Festival Celebrating Chinese Culture at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa. "The Olympics in China really woke us all up," Corey said. "The Chinese are a long way from being imitators; they are creators. This festival will make people aware of what will be happening in the future.
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