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Segolene Royal

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February 12, 2007 | Geraldine Baum and Achrene Sicakyuz, Special to The Times
Segolene Royal, who last year seemed destined to become the first female president of France, sought to renew her stalled campaign Sunday. With 10 weeks left before the first round of voting, Royal rolled out a "presidential pact" of 100 proposals, many of them aimed at wooing back her core supporters on the left.
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WORLD
October 16, 2011 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
France's Socialist Party selected a 57-year-old National Assembly deputy nicknamed "Monsieur Normal" to go head-to-head with beleaguered incumbent Nicolas Sarkozy in next year's presidential election. Francois Hollande won a convincing victory in a primary runoff Sunday against Martine Aubry, a former Labor minister. In his victory speech, Hollande said he was well aware of the "heavy and serious job" ahead of him as he seeks to unify the French left in order to bring it its first presidency for nearly 17 years.
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WORLD
June 19, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The couple at the head of France's main opposition Socialist Party is breaking up. Segolene Royal had shown little delicacy in sweeping aside Francois Hollande -- Socialist Party boss and the father of her four children -- to bid for the French presidency herself. She also kept him and the Socialists at arm's length for much of her failed campaign. And on Sunday night, as the results of parliamentary elections rolled in, they announced that their romantic relationship was over.
WORLD
August 28, 2011 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
France's sometimes fractious Socialist Party, often seen as the likeliest party to unseat President Nicolas Sarkozy in 2012, emerged from its annual conference Sunday with no damaging public divisions yet with few shared answers on how to modernize its economic program to adapt to current fiscal conditions. Despite several recent victories, Sarkozy remains unpopular. Yet the Socialists suffer from an image as a divided clan, and the ongoing European debt crisis and France's growing deficit fears have only made the jobs harder, rendering many of the party's earlier proposals seemingly impossible to fund.
WORLD
October 16, 2011 | By Kim Willsher, Los Angeles Times
France's Socialist Party selected a 57-year-old National Assembly deputy nicknamed "Monsieur Normal" to go head-to-head with beleaguered incumbent Nicolas Sarkozy in next year's presidential election. Francois Hollande won a convincing victory in a primary runoff Sunday against Martine Aubry, a former Labor minister. In his victory speech, Hollande said he was well aware of the "heavy and serious job" ahead of him as he seeks to unify the French left in order to bring it its first presidency for nearly 17 years.
WORLD
May 3, 2007 | Geraldine Baum, Times Staff Writer
Here is what has been said about Segolene Royal, the first woman with a real chance to be president of France: She is cold, authoritarian and a bully. She's ambitious yet a lightweight without the gravitas to head a nuclear state. She is a "conduit without content," nicknamed Egolene, the aspiring Joan of Arc. And that is from her friends on the left. Even before her opponent on the right, Nicolas Sarkozy, could take her on, the leaders of Royal's Socialist Party were maligning her.
WORLD
August 28, 2011 | By Devorah Lauter, Los Angeles Times
France's sometimes fractious Socialist Party, often seen as the likeliest party to unseat President Nicolas Sarkozy in 2012, emerged from its annual conference Sunday with no damaging public divisions yet with few shared answers on how to modernize its economic program to adapt to current fiscal conditions. Despite several recent victories, Sarkozy remains unpopular. Yet the Socialists suffer from an image as a divided clan, and the ongoing European debt crisis and France's growing deficit fears have only made the jobs harder, rendering many of the party's earlier proposals seemingly impossible to fund.
OPINION
May 4, 2007
An INTERNET VIDEO clip now appearing on French computer screens depicts presidential front-runner Nicolas Sarkozy fulfilling every Parisian's nightmares. Like the Fairy Godmother from Disney's "Cinderella" (and to the tune of "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo," sung in Hungarian to reflect Sarkozy's immigrant roots), he waves his magic wand to twist the Eiffel Tower into the Golden Arches, transform the Louvre into Las Vegas and change the tricolor flag under the Arc de Triomphe into the Stars and Stripes.
WORLD
May 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
French far-right leader Jean-Marie Le Pen urged supporters to abstain from Sunday's presidential runoff rather than vote for front-runner Nicolas Sarkozy or Socialist Segolene Royal. "I invite the voters who showed their confidence in me to give their vote neither to Madame Royal nor to Mr. Sarkozy," Le Pen told thousands of supporters at a rally in Paris to commemorate Joan of Arc.
WORLD
November 30, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy plans to seek the French presidency, pledging to recharge the country by breaking with coveted job protections and better integrating disillusioned minorities. Polls show the conservative Sarkozy neck and neck with his rival on the left, Socialist Segolene Royal. Royal, who was nominated two weeks ago, would become France's first female president if she won the April-May elections.
WORLD
June 19, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The couple at the head of France's main opposition Socialist Party is breaking up. Segolene Royal had shown little delicacy in sweeping aside Francois Hollande -- Socialist Party boss and the father of her four children -- to bid for the French presidency herself. She also kept him and the Socialists at arm's length for much of her failed campaign. And on Sunday night, as the results of parliamentary elections rolled in, they announced that their romantic relationship was over.
OPINION
May 4, 2007
An INTERNET VIDEO clip now appearing on French computer screens depicts presidential front-runner Nicolas Sarkozy fulfilling every Parisian's nightmares. Like the Fairy Godmother from Disney's "Cinderella" (and to the tune of "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo," sung in Hungarian to reflect Sarkozy's immigrant roots), he waves his magic wand to twist the Eiffel Tower into the Golden Arches, transform the Louvre into Las Vegas and change the tricolor flag under the Arc de Triomphe into the Stars and Stripes.
WORLD
May 3, 2007 | Geraldine Baum, Times Staff Writer
Here is what has been said about Segolene Royal, the first woman with a real chance to be president of France: She is cold, authoritarian and a bully. She's ambitious yet a lightweight without the gravitas to head a nuclear state. She is a "conduit without content," nicknamed Egolene, the aspiring Joan of Arc. And that is from her friends on the left. Even before her opponent on the right, Nicolas Sarkozy, could take her on, the leaders of Royal's Socialist Party were maligning her.
WORLD
February 12, 2007 | Geraldine Baum and Achrene Sicakyuz, Special to The Times
Segolene Royal, who last year seemed destined to become the first female president of France, sought to renew her stalled campaign Sunday. With 10 weeks left before the first round of voting, Royal rolled out a "presidential pact" of 100 proposals, many of them aimed at wooing back her core supporters on the left.
WORLD
November 17, 2006 | From the Washington Post
Riding a wave of popular disgust with France's political status quo, Segolene Royal on Thursday captured the Socialist Party's nomination for president, a race that could make her France's first female head of state. Royal, 53, is a single mother of four and protege of the late President Francois Mitterrand.
WORLD
November 18, 2006 | Alissa J. Rubin and Achrene Sicakyuz, Times Staff Writers
The victory of Segolene Royal in France's Socialist Party presidential primary was a case of personality outweighing policy, analysts said Friday. Her positions throughout the campaign were vague and sometimes even naive. But with a soaring smile, well-coiffed hair and a willingness to mix traditional Socialist views with popular rhetoric, she overcame her more pedantic party foes.
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