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Segovia Spain

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TRAVEL
June 16, 2002
In 1959 my family visited Segovia, Spain, and had lunch in the building shown below the aqueduct in your photograph ("History Colors the Canvas of Segovia," June 2). On the bar counter were two heaping bowls of snacks: deep-fried sheep heads, split (lengthwise), and deep-fried sparrows--all shiny with olive oil (or grease). We didn't sample them. DOUG MacDONALD Indio
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SPORTS
July 25, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Pedro Delgado of Spain felt right at home riding down the Champs Elysees Sunday to win the 75th Tour de France cycling race. Delgado made his triumphant ride amid dozens of red-and-yellow Spanish flags. More than 5,000 residents from Delgado's home of Segovia, Spain, were among the crowd estimated at 250,000, which watched under a brilliant summer sky. "In this moment I am thinking only of my mother," said Delgado, who was forced to withdraw from the 1986 Tour de France when his mother died.
SPORTS
August 2, 2000 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back home in Fullerton after a brutal seven-week stretch of tournaments in Europe and North America, Kevin Kim seemingly had a lot to celebrate on his 22nd birthday. He had just reached the singles and doubles final at the Aptos Challenger. His singles ranking was at an all-time high of 140, and he was finally beginning to regain some of the confidence he had during his junior career. But Kim, who starred at Sunny Hills High and UCLA, said there would be no celebration.
NEWS
July 6, 1992 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the film classic "Citizen Kane," various and sundry items of art and memory are found among the treasures of Xanadu--the fictional version of William Randolph Hearst's castle--in the wake of the media magnate's death. But a real-life look at one of Hearst's Brooklyn warehouses at the same time might have revealed something stranger even than a boy's beloved sled: a complete 12th-Century Spanish monastery, packed in crates. A funny thing happened to the monastery of St.
TRAVEL
September 9, 2001 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Pat McCully and Maribel Torrez took a trip to remember last spring. They went to Europe, which isn't remarkable in itself. It's the two of them who made it special. McCully is the 72-year-old founder of Circulo de Amigas Foundation, a Nicaraguan aid organization she started in 1987 by taking some secondhand sewing machines to the mountain village of Las Latas and teaching the women how to use them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2002 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The money to build the new Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels came by way of love, memory, faith and civic pride. A retired contractor remembered boyhood visits in the 1930s to a doughnut shop across the street from old St. Vibiana's Cathedral at 2nd and Main streets. A woman thought of her mother's ashes interred far away on property overlooking Puget Sound that was once the family home but had since been sold.
TRAVEL
December 7, 1986 | M. BOOTH GATHINGS, Gathings is a San Antonio, Tex., free-lance writer.
Imagine a town so high in the mountains that its inhabitants live with their heads in the clouds, a town where Indians clad in reddish pink and bright blue stroll the streets. Imagine a town whose 16th- and 17th-Century architecture makes it a Spanish colonial gem, a place that has the feeling of a Spanish outpost. Such is the dreamy realm of San Cristobal de las Casas, in Mexico's southernmost state of Chiapas.
SPORTS
July 6, 1991 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Craig Calfee was a sculptor and a performance artist before he knew anything about building bicycles. He worked as a crewman on sailboats in the Mediterranean Sea and the Indian Ocean, and once hitch-hiked across Africa, stowed away on a freighter and landed in South America. Then he came home to Boston and worked as a boat builder, making Olympic racing shells and kayaks with carbon fiber material.
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