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Segregation United States

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July 5, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and RAY HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the moment segregation in America had a name, it has referred to the separateness of blacks and whites. But during the last decade, while blacks were making some progress in residential integration, Latinos and Asians became more isolated from other racial groups in the vast majority of the nation's large metropolitan areas, from Chicago's red-bricked grid to Phoenix's beige sprawl, a Times analysis of 2000 census data shows.
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NEWS
July 5, 2001 | ROBIN FIELDS and RAY HERNDON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From the moment segregation in America had a name, it has referred to the separateness of blacks and whites. But during the last decade, while blacks were making some progress in residential integration, Latinos and Asians became more isolated from other racial groups in the vast majority of the nation's large metropolitan areas, from Chicago's red-bricked grid to Phoenix's beige sprawl, a Times analysis of 2000 census data shows.
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NEWS
February 24, 1988 | From Reuters
The U.N. Human Rights Commission adopted a resolution Tuesday backing armed struggle to eliminate apartheid in South Africa and demanded mandatory sanctions against the system of racial segregation. The United States, Britain and West Germany voted against the resolution, which passed 33 to 3. Seven other industrialized countries abstained. The resolution was similar to decisions by the U.N. General Assembly and past Human Rights Commissions.
NEWS
July 26, 1985 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
Secretary of State George P. Shultz called Thursday for a high-level meeting with the South African government to give the United States a chance to dramatize its outrage at the white minority regime's crackdown on black political activity. But Shultz and other top Administration officials made it clear that the U.S. response to South Africa's "state of emergency," during which at least 800 people have been arrested and at least 15 have been killed, would be primarily rhetorical.
NEWS
March 13, 1987 | Associated Press
Sweden on Thursday ordered an end to all trade with South Africa in one of the harshest actions so far by an industrialized nation against apartheid. Foreign Minister Sten Andersson said the Swedish government hopes that the decision will influence the United Nations to recommend binding sanctions. He told reporters that when Sweden banned new investments in South Africa in 1979, "people said that would make no difference, have no effect . . . but in fact many countries followed us."
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