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Segway Company

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NEWS
January 16, 2003 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
For Bruce Weinberg, riding his new Segway Human Transporter is both exciting and nerve-racking. As the first person in Los Angeles to get one, the self-declared gadget guy is excited to put the hugely hyped self-balancing scooter to good use. But he's also nervous. "I need to be ultra-careful, just making sure that my first impression with everybody who sees me is a positive one," said Weinberg, who, though unaffiliated with the company, considers himself a goodwill ambassador of sorts.
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WORLD
September 27, 2010 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
A British businessman who last year bought the company that makes the Segway scooter fell to his death off a cliff in northern England, apparently while riding one of the vehicles on his estate. West Yorkshire police said in a statement that the body of Jimi Heselden, 62, had been pulled Monday from the River Wharfe near the town of Boston Spa after a call from a passerby. Local media reports said he was believed to have lost control of his scooter Sunday on a wooded path that runs close to a 30-foot drop to the river.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Most residents who shed the family car tool around town in golf carts. Now, they can scoot around on those single-rider Segway human transporters. The City Council decided Thursday to allow the operation of Segways or other motorized nonvehicle devices. California law classifies Segway devices as "electric personal assistive mobility devices," so they are considered pedestrian devices, not vehicles.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Police officers assigned to parks and beaches for the summer will get around on Segways, the motorized scooters once described as the first great invention of the 21st century. Patrol officers earlier used the two-wheeled vehicles in Central and Prospect parks on a trial basis, but they were recalled because they tended to fall over when the battery ran low. The problem has been fixed, and now the New York Police Department has spent $53,000 to buy 10 for use beginning today.
NATIONAL
May 17, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Police officers assigned to parks and beaches for the summer will get around on Segways, the motorized scooters once described as the first great invention of the 21st century. Patrol officers earlier used the two-wheeled vehicles in Central and Prospect parks on a trial basis, but they were recalled because they tended to fall over when the battery ran low. The problem has been fixed, and now the New York Police Department has spent $53,000 to buy 10 for use beginning today.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | Pete Metzger
Since the first Segway stand-up scooters went on the market two years ago, they've been hailed as a vehicle from the future, ridiculed as a fad, banned in some cities and even recalled in late 2003. But with all the hype, few can say they've piloted one. Now, for better or worse, this "unique self-balancing electric-powered transportation device" can be yours for $45 an hour at the Santa Monica Segway dealership, the only official rental shop in L.A., Orange, Ventura and San Bernardino counties.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2001 | Associated Press
The ultra-secret "It" invention that has kept the high-tech world abuzz for nearly a year is a self-balancing, motorized scooter that costs less that 5 cents a day to operate, Time magazine reports in today's edition. Inventor Dean Kamen believes the machine, code-named It but officially known as Segway, will eventually replace cars in crowded downtown areas by enabling users to zip around at virtually no cost and no harm to the environment.
WORLD
September 27, 2010 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
A British businessman who last year bought the company that makes the Segway scooter fell to his death off a cliff in northern England, apparently while riding one of the vehicles on his estate. West Yorkshire police said in a statement that the body of Jimi Heselden, 62, had been pulled Monday from the River Wharfe near the town of Boston Spa after a call from a passerby. Local media reports said he was believed to have lost control of his scooter Sunday on a wooded path that runs close to a 30-foot drop to the river.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2002 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles may be the car capital of the world, but transit officials think it is time commuters consider a new way to get around town. Their chosen alternative: the electric scooter. Under a program scheduled for launch in April, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority will lease dozens of electric scooters and bicycles to commuters who live near crowded transit parking lots.
NEWS
December 23, 2004 | Pete Metzger
Since the first Segway stand-up scooters went on the market two years ago, they've been hailed as a vehicle from the future, ridiculed as a fad, banned in some cities and even recalled in late 2003. But with all the hype, few can say they've piloted one. Now, for better or worse, this "unique self-balancing electric-powered transportation device" can be yours for $45 an hour at the Santa Monica Segway dealership, the only official rental shop in L.A., Orange, Ventura and San Bernardino counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Most residents who shed the family car tool around town in golf carts. Now, they can scoot around on those single-rider Segway human transporters. The City Council decided Thursday to allow the operation of Segways or other motorized nonvehicle devices. California law classifies Segway devices as "electric personal assistive mobility devices," so they are considered pedestrian devices, not vehicles.
NEWS
January 16, 2003 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
For Bruce Weinberg, riding his new Segway Human Transporter is both exciting and nerve-racking. As the first person in Los Angeles to get one, the self-declared gadget guy is excited to put the hugely hyped self-balancing scooter to good use. But he's also nervous. "I need to be ultra-careful, just making sure that my first impression with everybody who sees me is a positive one," said Weinberg, who, though unaffiliated with the company, considers himself a goodwill ambassador of sorts.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2001 | Associated Press
The ultra-secret "It" invention that has kept the high-tech world abuzz for nearly a year is a self-balancing, motorized scooter that costs less that 5 cents a day to operate, Time magazine reports in today's edition. Inventor Dean Kamen believes the machine, code-named It but officially known as Segway, will eventually replace cars in crowded downtown areas by enabling users to zip around at virtually no cost and no harm to the environment.
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