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Seibu Motor Sales Co

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BUSINESS
June 28, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.S. and Japanese negotiators argued over foreign access to Japan's auto market, Chrysler Corp. announced Tuesday that it will spend $100 million to buy control of a dealer network here in a bid to boost its Japanese sales nearly eightfold by 1999. Chrysler's move will make it the first U.S. auto firm with majority ownership of a dealership chain in Japan. Chrysler will buy control of Seibu Motor Sales Co.
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BUSINESS
June 28, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As U.S. and Japanese negotiators argued over foreign access to Japan's auto market, Chrysler Corp. announced Tuesday that it will spend $100 million to buy control of a dealer network here in a bid to boost its Japanese sales nearly eightfold by 1999. Chrysler's move will make it the first U.S. auto firm with majority ownership of a dealership chain in Japan. Chrysler will buy control of Seibu Motor Sales Co.
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BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Car Dealer to Sell Chryslers: In a small step toward quieting complaints that Japan's car distribution system locks out foreign competition, Chrysler Corp. is linking up with a dealership that until now has sold only autos made by Daihatsu Motor Co. Chrysler will begin selling its cars, including the Jeep Cherokee sport utility vehicle and the Vision sedan, through Niigata Daihatsu Motors Co. on Japan's northern coast.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1995 | From Associated Press
It's probably No. 1 on the list of common mistakes by foreign firms in Japan: "Our strategy worked wonders with the folks back home, so it's sure to work with the Japanese too." Now, many analysts say, another American firm could be on the way to making that mistake here. And this is no inexperienced mom-and-pop operation: It is the world's biggest car maker, General Motors Corp.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Toshiaki Yamamoto and his wife dropped by their neighborhood Ford dealer after a recent Sunday morning of golf, they were impressed with what they saw. "Before, I wasn't interested in American cars because they obviously were not fitted to Japanese road conditions," Yamamoto said. "They were too big for Japanese narrow streets, and the steering wheel was on the other side. . . .
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